Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

BSD

[Release of] OpenBSD 6.1

Filed under
BSD

This is a partial list of new features and systems included in OpenBSD 6.1. For a comprehensive list, see the changelog leading to 6.1.

Read more

Also: OpenBSD 6.1 Released: ARM64 Platform Support & More

BSD News: ZFS Talk and OpenBSD running on Raspberry Pi 3

Filed under
BSD

A Penguin tries out TrueOS, part II

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

In the first part of this article I’ve covered system installation, first login and GNOME/XFCE desktop environments usage and I’ve had a brief look at the init system of TrueOS.
In this second part I’m reviewing TrueOS’ most exclusive and distinctive feature, the updates’ management.

Read more

Kicking Off April With An Eight-Way BSD/Linux Comparison

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

For getting April started, here is a fresh comparison of various BSDs and Linux distributions tested on an Intel Core i7 6800K Broadwell-E box. Tested operating systems included Antergos, Clear Linux, DragonFlyBSD 4.8, FreeBSD 11.0, Scientific Linux 7.3, TrueOS 20160322, Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS, and Ubuntu 17.04 20170330.

Read more

Also: Radeon TONGA Sees Some Gains With AMDGPU DRM-Next 4.12

A Penguin tries out TrueOS, formerly PC-BSD, part I

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

TrueOS is a rolling-release, desktop-oriented operating system built upon the FreeBSD-CURRENT branch. Its aim is to add desktop-usability, speed and grace to an elephant. It is more a FreeBSD tuning than a fork of it, anyway.

TrueOS is formerly known as PC-BSD; project changed its name, became rolling and mostly dropped pbi’s in late 2016.

Read more

Benchmarks & Trying Out DragonFlyBSD 4.8

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

With DragonFlyBSD 4.8 making its debut yesterday, I was excited to give this updated BSD operating system a try now that it has UEFI support and some performance improvements. Here are some early benchmark results of DragonFlyBSD 4.8 compared to 4.6 and Intel's Clear Linux for some additional reference points.

Read more

DragonFly BSD 4.8 Released with EFI & eMMC Support, Improved Kernel Performance

Filed under
BSD

The developers of the DragonFly BSD operating system were proud to announce today, March 27, 2017, the release and immediate availability for download of DragonFly BSD 4.8.

Read more

Also: DragonFlyBSD 4.8 Released With Performance Improvements, EFI Support & More

DragonFly BSD 4.8

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD

BSD: iXsystems and DragonFlyBSD

Filed under
BSD
  • iXsystems Sees Record Growth in 2016, Charges Into 2017

    The FreeNAS Mini XL was also added, aimed at bringing enterprise-grade storage technology to the small office and home office user

  • VGA-Switcheroo Ported From Linux To DragonFlyBSD

    The latest DRM/graphics-related porting effort by François Tigeot in the DragonFly space is bringing over the vga_swticheroo module from the Linux kernel.

    François Tigeot continues doing a good job porting Linux DRM drivers over to DragonFlyBSD and getting them close to the state where they are with the mainline Linux Git tree. His latest effort is about getting VGA-Switcheroo working on DragonFly.

BSD and GPL

Filed under
GNU
BSD
  • Call for testing: OpenSSH 7.5p1

    OpenSSH 7.5p1 is almost ready for release, so we would appreciate testing on as many platforms and systems as possible. This is a bugfix release.

  • Updates to the last two posts

    Someone from the FSF’s licencing department posted an official-looking thing saying they don’t believe GitHub’s new ToS to be problematic with copyleft. Well, my lawyer (not my personal one, nor for The MirOS Project, but related to another association, informally) does agree with my reading of the new ToS, and I can point out at least a clause in the GPLv1 (I really don’t have time right now) which says contrary (but does this mean the FSF generally waives the restrictions of the GPL for anything on GitHub?). I’ll eMail GitHub Legal directly and will try to continue getting this fixed (as soon as I have enough time for it) as I’ll otherwise be forced to force GitHub to remove stuff from me (but with someone else as original author) under GPL, such as… tinyirc and e3.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews AJ Jordon of gplenforced.org

So basically Bradley Kuhn gave a talk at FOSDEM '17 about GPL enforcement and I was like, wow, it sucks how many companies and people think that enforcing the GPL is a bad idea. I mean, if you disagree with copyleft that's fine (though I personally would argue with that position), but then you should use a suitable license. Like MIT. The very idea that we shouldn't enforce the GPL just doesn't make sense to me because it suggests that the text of the license is watery and unimportant. I don't know about you, but when I say I want my programs to respect users' freedom, I mean it. So GPL enforcement is important. It seemed to me that there are probably a lot of developers out there who want to support GPL enforcement but don't have a good way to voice that support. gplenforced.org is essentially a quick and dirty hack I wrote to make that dead-simple. Read more

Red Hat General and Financial News

today's howtos