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BSD

Linux Vs Unix: The Crucial Differences That Matter To Linux Professionals

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

Lately, we hear a lot about Linux — how it’s dominating on servers, how it makes up a large chunk of the smartphone market, and how it’s becoming a highly viable option on the desktop. But Linux didn’t appear out of thin air; before the creation of Linux, and before the rise of Windows, the computing world was dominated by Unix. And for those who don’t know, Linux is very similar to Unix. Since we’ve already looked at the differences between Linux and Windows, what exactly is the difference between Linux and Unix?

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FreeBSD Foundation Receives $1 Million from WhatsApp CEO

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BSD

The FreeBSD project has received a massive $1 million (€800,000) donation from one of the WhatsApp co-founders, Jan Koum, and the developers are more than thrilled at the fact that they have secured their future, at least for a while.

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PC-BSD 10.1-RELEASE Now Available

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BSD

The PC-BSD team is pleased to announce the availability of PC-BSD 10.1 release!

A very special thank you goes out to all the contributors for this release, your help and feedback was greatly appreciated!

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DragonFlyBSD 4.0 RC3 Is Out, Faster DRM Drivers Coming

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BSD

The third release candidate is out for the upcoming DragonFlyBSD 4.0 operating system release.

DragonFlyBSD 4.0 has been in an RC state since last month and uploaded last night was now the third release candidate that brings more updates to the popular BSD derivative.

DragonFlyBSD 4.0 RC2 was released just earlier this week to add procctl() support. The RC3 release has just a few changes around the procctl() system call, a segmentation fault fix, and updating time zone data.

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FreeBSD 10.1 Release Now Available

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BSD

After being set back by only some minor delays, FreeBSD 10.1 stable is now available in released form.

FreeBSD 10.1 brings many new features covered in multiple Phoronix articles but if you're not up to speed on the new release, there's also the 10.1R release notes and the official announcement. Some of our favorite features include the new VT console driver, Bhyve ZFS boot support, UEFI for FreeBSD 64-bit, AutoFS added, and many other package updates and new additions.

Download FreeBSD 10.1-RELEASE from FreeBSD.org.

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OpenBSD Finally Has USB 3.0 Support

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BSD

OpenBSD's latest feature is support for USB 3.0.

For those using OpenBSD, as of last week USB 3.0 support was committed to the operating system. When enabling XHCI for OpenBSD, most USB 3.0 features are working but isochronous transfers go unsupported for now.

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OpenMandriva Lx Is Switching To Clang By Default

Filed under
MDV
BSD

While OS X has switched to LLVM's Clang as the default C/C++ compiler and FreeBSD and other BSD distributions have followed in switching to Clang instead of GCC due to its more permissive license, OpenMandriva Lx is one of the first notable Linux distributions set to switch to Clang by default with its next release.

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Systemd again? Debian drops kFreeBSD as official architecture

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Debian
BSD

The Debian GNU/Linux project has decided not to support its GNU/kFreeBSD distribution as an official release for the forthcoming version 8.0 which is better known as Jessie.

GNU/kFreeBSD is one of the numerous Debian architectures that combines the userland of GNU/Linux with a FreeBSD kernel. Debian is the only GNU/Linux distribution that releases with anything other than a Linux kernel.

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The NetBSD Project: ARM multiprocessor support

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BSD

Those following the source-changes mailing list closely may have noticed several evbarm kernels getting "options MULTIPROCESSOR" in the last few days. This is due to those configurations now running properly in SMP mode, thanks to work mostly done by Matt Thomas and Nick Hudson.

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FreeBSD 10.1 RC4 Is the Last One Before the Stable Release

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BSD

The developers of the FreeBSD operating system have been working very hard to close the cycle for the 10.1 version and it looks like this might be the final version in the series. If everything goes well we might get a new stable version of this OS next week.

"The fourth RC build of the 10.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, armv6, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures. This is anticipated to be the final RC build of the 10.1-RELEASE cycle," reads the official website. Only a couple of fixes have been implemented, so it's a good idea to update.

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IsoHunt releases roll-your-own Pirate Bay

Open Source Meritocracy Is More Than a Joke

In January 2014, Github removed the rug in its office's waiting room in response to criticism of its slogan, "United Meritocracy of Github." Since then, the criticism of the idea of meritocracy has spread in free software circles. "Meritocracy is a joke," has become a slogan seen on T-shirts and constantly proclaimed, especially by feminists. Such commentary is true — so far as it goes, but it ignores the potential benefits of meritocracy as an ethos. Anyone who bothers to look can see that meritocracy is more of an ideal than a standard practice in free software. The idea that people should be valued for their contributions may seem to be a way to promote fairness, but the practice is frequently more complicated. Read more Also: Unmanagement and unleadership

Linux Kernel Developers Consider Live Kernel Patching Solution

kPatch and kGraph may soon enable live kernel updates on all Linux distributions, making it possible to apply security and other patches on the open source operating system without rebooting. Read more

A real-time editing tool for Wikipedia

Wikipedia is one of the most frequently visited websites in the world. The vast online encyclopedia, editable by anyone, has become the go-to source for general information on any subject. However, the "crowdsourcing" used by Wikipedia opens their doors to spin and whitewashing–edits that may be less than factual in nature. To help journalists, citizens, and activists track these edits, TWG (The Working Group) partnered with Metro News and the Center for Investigative Reporting to build WikiWash. Read more