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BSD

LLVM 3.8 Officially Released

Filed under
Development
BSD

While running late, the release of LLVM 3.8 and Clang 3.8 is now officially available.

If you missed out on LLVM/Clang 3.8 features, see our feature overview. Aside from all the traditional compiler improvements, LLVM 3.8 is also exciting for AMDGPU users as being an important update for those using the AMD open-source Linux graphics driver stack.

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FreeBSD 10.3-RC1 and OpenBSD 5.9

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BSD
  • FreeBSD 10.3-RC1 Brings Security Fixes, Hyper-V Tweaks

    FreeBSD 10.3-RC1 was released today as the newest development milestone leading up to FreeBSD 10.3 that should be officially released later this month.

    FreeBSD 10.3-RC1 has a number of OpenSSL security fixes, Hyper-V driver changes, regression fixes, and other bug fixes.

  • Pre-orders for 5.9 are up!

    OpenBSD 5.9 is shaping up to be quite a big release, and pre-orders for the CD sets have just been activated.

FreeBSD 10.3: Third Beta Available

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BSD

That personal tidbit aside, another important part of March — especially this month — is that on the road to FreeBSD 11 sometime later this year, FreeBSD 10.3 is well along the way, with the third beta already available, according to a very detailed post by Marius Strobl on the FreeBSD Stable mailing list.

To summarize, installations for FreeBSD 10.3 Beta3 are now available for amd64, i386, ia64, PowerPC, Sparc and a variety of ARM processors. Checksums, too numerous to list here, can be found in Strobl’s original post, linked in the paragraph above.

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OpenSSH 7.2 Out Now with Support for RSA Signatures Using SHA-256/512 Algorithms

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BSD

Today, February 29, 2016, the OpenBSD project had the great pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of OpenSSH 7.2 for all supported platforms.

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Leftovers: BSD (BSDCan, LLVM 3.8, and FreeBSD 10.3 Coming)

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BSD
  • BSDCan: OpenBSD presentations

    The event will be held on June 8-11th at the University of Ottawa in Canada.

  • The Release Of LLVM 3.8 Should Be Imminent

    While LLVM/Clang 3.8 was supposed to be released last week, its release got delayed but it looks like it should finally ship in the next few days.

    On Tuesday, LLVM release manager Hans Wennborg announced the release of LLVM 3.8 Release Candidate 3. He mentioned, "If there are no regressions from previous release candidates, this will be the last release candidate before the final release."

  • FreeBSD 10.3 Is Almost Ready For Release

    The third beta of the upcoming FreeBSD 10.3 is now available for testing.

    FreeBSD 10.3 Beta 3 brings updated network drivers, improvements to the filemon device, Hyper-V fixes, a few new commands, and various other minor enhancements and corrections.

Speaking on BSD: The Waiting Is the Hardest Part

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BSD

After answering various calls for presentations to a few upcoming shows, it stands to reason that Tom Petty is right: The waiting is the hardest part.

Because I now use PC-BSD on a daily basis, the idea going forward is to pitch talks about the conversion from one side of the Free/Open Source Software street to the other; the uplifting situations and occasional hurdle such a conversion brings, and to outline the similiarities (lots) and differences (few, but relatively significant) between Linux distros and BSD variants.

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BSD: LLVM, LightZone

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Development
BSD

FreeBSD, Variants Not Affected by Recent GNU Bug

Filed under
Security
BSD

Much has been made about a vulnerability in a function in the GNU C Library. And searching far and wide over the Internet, there was little — actually nothing — I could find regarding how this affected BSD variants.

However, you can rest easy, BSDers: Not our circus, not our monkeys.

Dag-Erling Smørgrav, a FreeBSD developer since 1998 and the current FreeBSD Security Officer, writes in his blog that “neither FreeBSD itself nor native FreeBSD applications are affected.”

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FreeBSD 10.3 Beta 2 Is Out with Support for the Latest ZFS Boot Environment

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BSD

Marius Strobl was happy to inform all fans of the FreeBSD operating system that they can now test drive the second Beta build of the upcoming FreeBSD 10.3 release, which should hit the streets in late March 2016.

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DragonFly BSD 4.4.2 Released with OpenSSL 1.0.1r and Kernel Quirks for xHCI USB

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BSD

While not a GNU/Linux operating system, DragonFly BSD remains one of the most appreciated BSD distributions, and it looks like its maintainers are keeping it up-to-date always.

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