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Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • Deweloperzy OpenBSD: Vadim Zhukov

    I’m a 30 years old programmer/sysadmin with wide range of interests from Moscow, Russia. I’m working in IT industry for about half of my life, and last few years I’m also a freelance teacher at Moscow State University of Information Technologies, Radiotechnics and Electronics (ex. Moscow State Institute of Radio Engineering, Electronics and Automation). I have a daughter (best one in the world, of course), which was born at October, 18 – you may call this a Fate. Smile

  • EuroBSDCon 2014 Videos Online

    No, that's not a typo; the videos for EuroBSDCon 2014 are finally online.

  • Deweloperzy OpenBSD: Ingo Schwarze

    Since 2001, so for almost three quarters of its history by now. Originally, it was pure chance. A coworker who used to run various Linux distributions repeatedly got his boxes rooted. Instead of properly securing them, he proposed to try OpenBSD. I said i didn’t care much which system he used. At that time, i was used to working on many different Unix and Unix-like systems (DEC OSF/1, Ultix, HP-UX, AIX, SuSE Linux, Debian GNU/Linux …) and OpenBSD looked like just another Unix-like system, so why not.

  • Linux Top 3: Robolinux 8.2, Bodhi Linux and OpenBSD 5.8

    Lots of changes debut in the new OpenBSD 5.8 release including some interesting security updates.

  • Microsoft taps open source LLVM compiler for cross-platform .Net

    Consider the LLILC project. Rather than reinvent the wheel, Microsoft's new compiler for its CoreCLR .Net runtime leverages an existing cross-platform compiler framework: LLVM. Now six months into the project, its maintainers -- a foundation comprised largely but not exclusively of folks from Microsoft -- reports "great progress" with LLILC, but also "much still to do."

An OpenBSD History Lesson to Mark the Open Source OS's 20th Birthday

Filed under
OSS
BSD

OpenBSD, the open source Unix-like operating system that today mostly lives in Linux's shadow, turns 20 this month. To mark the occasion, here's some historical background on one of the only major "open source" operating systems to have survived without embracing the GNU GPL license.

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Why Samsung's Open-Source Group Likes The LLVM Clang Compiler

Filed under
Development
BSD

Samsung is just one of many companies that has grown increasingly fond of the LLVM compiler infrastructure and Clang C/C++ front-end. Clang is in fact the default compiler for native applications on their Tizen platform, but they have a whole list of reasons why they like this compiler.

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Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD

FreeNAS 10 Enters Alpha, Brings Lots of New Technologies, Based on FreeBSD 10.2

Filed under
Security
BSD

FreeNAS' Jordan Hubbard was proud to announce the other day, October 8, the release and immediate availability for download of the first Alpha build of the upcoming FreeNAS open source Network Attached Storage (NAS) solution.

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Running Some Fresh BSD vs. Linux Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

Given the recent releases of FreeBSD 10.2 and NetBSD 7.0, plus the H2'2015 Linux distribution updates rolling around, I've just started work on a new BSD vs. Linux operating system performance comparison.

First up are the BSD distributions for testing... The test system being used for this comparison is an Intel Xeon E5-2687W v3 Haswell-E plus AMD FirePro system. Given the new release of NetBSD 7.0, I decided to try that out first.

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Enlightenment 0.20 Alpha Has Full Wayland Support, Better FreeBSD Support

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

Enlightenment DR 0.20 Alpha has been released as the first step towards E20 with one year having passed since E19.

Enlightenment E20 in its current state has full Wayland support with much better, more featureful support than what's found in E19. That's why Wayland support was removed from E19 rather than for any nefarious reasons.

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NetBSD 7.0 Released With New ARM Board Support, Lua Kernel Scripting

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BSD

NetBSD 7.0 was quietly released at the end of September.

NetBSD 7.0 is a big release for this BSD operating system and it features Lua kernel scripting support, GCC 4.8.4 is the default compiler, DRM/KMS graphics support, multi-core support for ARM, Raspberry Pi 2 with SMP support, NPF improvements, and a variety of other enhancements.

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LLVM/Clang

Filed under
BSD

BSD Leftovers (mostly Phoronix)

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BSD
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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Debian Handheld Pre-orders, GNOME Scores RH Servers

From (some of) the folks that brought you Pandora comes new Linux gaming handheld Pyra. Pre-orders are now being taken. The Free Software Foundation filed a comment with the U.S. Copyright Office calling for an end to JavaScript requirements on government websites. Red Hat recently donated two servers to the GNOME project and Nick Heath examined a draft of the Munich Open Source report. Douglas DeMaio posted of Tumbleweed updates and vulnerabilities in ImageMagick have webmasters scrambling. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Canonical Makes It Easy for Users to Install Snaps via Ubuntu Software
    We published earlier an update to an article published last week about the fact that there was a nasty bug present in the GNOME Software application that made it impossible for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) users to install third-party .deb packages. On May 4, 2016, Canonical finally pushed the patched version of the GNOME Software app, which is called Ubuntu Software in the newly released Ubuntu 16.04 LTS operating system, allowing users to install various applications distributed in the .deb file format and obtained from third-party sources with a simple double mouse click on the file.
  • You Can Now Install Third-Party Debs via GNOME Software in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    We told you last week that there's a pretty nasty bug in the GNOME Software application, a graphical package manager from the GNOME Stack, that does not allow Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users to install third-party .deb files.
  • Ubuntu Make 16.05 Lands on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Brings Android Studio and SDK Fixes
    Ubuntu Make developer Didier Roche announced the release of Ubuntu Make 16.05, a new maintenance release of his open-source CLI tool that lets developers install various third-party SDKs and IDEs.

No one should have to use proprietary software to communicate with their government

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) submitted a comment to the U.S. Copyright Office calling for a method to submit comments that do not require the use of proprietary JavaScript. Proprietary JavaScript is a threat to all users on the Web. When minified, the code can hide all sorts of nasty items, like spyware and other security risks. Savvy users can protect themselves by blocking scripts in their browser, or by installing the LibreJS browser extension and avoiding sites that require proprietary JavaScript in order to function. But some sites are harder to avoid than others. This is particularly the case when the site is required for citizens to communicate or interact with their own government. If no free alternative means are provided, then users can be blocked from participating in the democratic process. Read more