Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

BSD

DragonFlyBSD 4.4 Brings Collation Support, Uses Gold Linker By Default

Filed under
BSD

DragonFlyBSD 4.4 is ready for release with a number of exciting improvements and new features.

DragonFlyBSD 4.4 delivers improvements to the i915 and Radeon DRM drivers that are now up to parity with their state from Linux 3.18, supports collation for named locales, a overhauled locale system, and the regex library was replaced with the TRE library. Also very prominent to DragonFlyBSD 4.4 is that it uses the Gold linker by default.

Read more

Is That Linux? No, It’s PC-BSD

Filed under
Linux
BSD

Linux was fast enough on this machine. But in street racing parlance, with PC-BSD I’m burning rubber in all four gears.

Read more

A few thoughts on OpenBSD 5.8

Filed under
BSD

I've been using OpenBSD since way back at release 2.3 in 1998, so I've gone through upgrades that took a fair amount of work due to incompatible changes, like the switch from ipf to pf for host firewalling or the change to ELF binaries. The upgrade from 5.7 to 5.8 was a pretty smooth and easy one, for the most part. The two most painful changes for me were the replacement of sudo with doas and the dropping of support in the rc.conf for the pf_rules variable. While sudo is still available as a package, I like the idea of reducing attack surface with a simpler program, so I made the switch. The two things I miss most about sudo are the ability to authenticate for a period of time and the ability to have a single config file across a whole set of servers. The former I'm just living with, the latter I've adjusted to by having a single config file that has lines commented out depending on which server it's on. I did have one moment of concern about the quality of doas when it incorrectly reported the line number on which I had a syntax error in the config file--fortunately, this was just a failure to increment the line count on continuation lines (ending with a "\") which is fixed in the -current release.

Read more

Area51 updates (KDE on FreeBSD)

Filed under
KDE
BSD

The area51 repository continues to update, even as the official ports tree for FreeBSD sticks with KDE4. Since the KDE-FreeBSD team is also responsible for the official ports, that basically means that not everything has been shaken out yet, and that the team doesn’t feel that it can provide a really good Frameworks5 / Plasma5 / Applications installation .. yet. I’ve been playing with ideas for a default desktop wallpaper (the upstream default gives me a headache; I’d really like to combine Flying Konqui by Timothée Giet with bubbles made from the BSD logo.

Read more

DragonFlyBSD Switches To Gold Linker By Default

Filed under
BSD

DragonFlyBSD has switched to using the Gold Linker by default rather than GNU ld.

The GNU Gold linker for ELF files is designed to be faster and much more modern than the GNU linker. DragonFlyBSD has traditionally used GNU ld, but now Gold is ready for primetime use by default on this BSD distribution.

Read more

OpenBSD Interview: Renato Westphal (renato@)

Filed under
Interviews
BSD

My history with OpenBSD started around 2011 when I was still an undergrad student working part-time on an University-Industry partnership program. In this job I was assigned the task of implementing a full (!) MPLS solution for Linux and that task encompassed having a working implementation of the LDP protocol, among several other things. I started then looking for an open source implementation of LDP and found out that OpenBSD had a daemon called ldpd(8). I decided to check it out and it was love at the first sight when I saw its code: it was beautiful! I started then porting this daemon to Linux and on top of that fixed quite a few bugs. Two years later I decided that it would be fair to contribute my fixes back to the original implementation, it was when claudio@ invited me to join the OpenBSD team. Around that time I didn't know much about OpenBSD and was surprised with the invitation. Theo de Raadt sent me a couple of emails and I had no clue about who he was. Nevertheless, I was excited with the invitation and started to follow the mailing lists and even bought a book about OpenBSD. Within a couple days I was hooked on it and OpenBSD became my OS of choice.

Read more

Also: Hackfest OpenBSD presentations

DragonFlyBSD 4.4 Up To RC State, DragonFlyBSD 4.5 In Development

Filed under
BSD

The DragonFlyBSD operating system continues to move along.

With the kernel being branched for 4.4 and DragonFlyBSD 4.4 RC being tagged, the latest Git code for the DragonFlyBSD kernel has moved onto DragonFlyBSD 4.5.

Read more

The Devil & BSD: Leaving Linux Behind

Filed under
BSD

I’m keeping Linux on the desktop box — Korora, for those of you keeping score at home — and on a couple of infrequently used old ThinkPads. However, I’ve spent the last three weeks getting up to speed on PC-BSD, which I have finally installed on the main drive of my daily workhorse ThinkPad T500.

Read more

LLVM to get Fortran compiler that targets parallel GPUs in clusters

Filed under
Development
BSD
  • LLVM to get Fortran compiler that targets parallel GPUs in clusters

    Today, the US Department of Energy announced that it had established a partnership with Nvidia that would be enhancing the LLVM compiler collection. The goal will be to port an existing Fortran compiler that targets massively parallel GPUs. The results are expected to be released as open source in late 2016.

  • NNSA & NVIDIA To Develop LLVM Fortran Compiler

    The US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration has teamed up with NVIDIA's PGI compiler division to create an open-source Fortran compiler atop LLVM.

OpenMediaVault: NAS for everyone

Filed under
Debian
BSD

Despite being open source software, the most-popular NAS solution, FreeNAS, is at best only a cousin of the Linux operating system. It’s based on FreeBSD, uses the ZFS filesystem, and is more suitable for large-scale enterprise-wide deployments than the sort of home projects beloved of Linux users. If you’re a Linux user looking for a simple but effective tool for housing and managing data, the Debian-based OpenMediaVault (OMV) is a better bet.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

The Internet Without Connection, Free Endless OS For Emerging Markets

There are four billion people on the planet without PCs or access to affordable personal computers. That figure should surely be tempered with some contextualization i.e. not everybody actually wants to have an Internet connection and many traditional, native or bucolic ways of live do still exist on the planet. Regardless, there are a batch of global initiatives in existence which seek to give computer access to every man, woman and especially child. Endless OS is one such project. The free operating system has been designed explicitly to work in the expensive or restrictive Internet data conditions that often exist in emerging markets where fabulously affordable broadband has yet to arrive. The software itself is built to provide useful information and educational content, with or without an Internet connection. Read more