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Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • LLVM 5.0 Should Offer Better AMD Ryzen Performance

    Since January there's been Zen tuning in LLVM Clang with the "znver1" flag, similar to the znver1 tuning in GCC that's been in place since 2015. While LLVM Clang 4.0 has the initial znver1 support, it's incomplete.

    In LLVM/Clang 4.0 and currently in SVN/Git master, znver1 is relying upon the btver1 scheduler model. Btver1 is for AMD's Bobcat.

  • OpenBSD vmm/vmd Update (PDF)

    Mike Larkin,
    bhyvecon 2017,
    09 Mar 2017 – Tokyo, Japan

  • pfSense 2.3.3-p1 RELEASE Now Available!

    pfSense software version 2.3.3-p1 is now available! This is a maintenance/errata patch available by running an update from an existing installation and it does not have a standalone installer to download.

  • pfSense 2.3.3-p1 Is Updated to FreeBSD 10.3-RELEASE-p17, Includes Security Fixes

    Rubicon Communications' Jim Pingle is announcing the availability of the pfSense 2.3.3-p1 maintenance update to the world's most trusted open source firewall based on BSD technologies.

    pfSense 2.3.3-p1 appears to be a small point release that includes an up-to-date base system updated to the FreeBSD 10.3-RELEASE-p17 build, fixing the CVE-2016-7055, CVE-2017-3731, and CVE-2017-3732 vulnerabilities. It also includes a total of nineteen security/bug fixes, especially for cURL, which was updated to version 7.53.0 to fix CVE-2017-2629, and OpenSSL.

LLVM 4.0.0 Release

Filed under
Development
BSD
  • LLVM 4.0.0 Release

    It is my pleasure to announce that LLVM 4 is now available.

  • LLVM 4.0 Released

    Hans Wennborg has announced the release of LLVM 4.0 and connected sub-projects like Clang 4.0. LLVM/Clang 4.0 is a big update to this open-source compiler infrastructure stack and also marks the change to their new versioning scheme.

    For release highlights of LLVM/Clang 4.0, see our feature overview for the advancements made to this compiler stack over the past half-year. LLVM 4.0 was supposed to ship back in February but bugs had dragged out the release until today.

DragonFlyBSD and FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD
  • DragonFlyBSD 4.8 Up To Release Candidate Phase

    A few hours ago, DragonFlyBSD 4.8 RC was tagged. This is a significant update with the changes to DragonFly since the 4.6 release last August. DragonFly in this time has seen improved UEFI installation support, NUMA-awareness and memory changes, updated DRM graphics driver code, expanded LibreSSL support, dropped PulseAudio, and many other changes.

  • Intel To Increase Engagement With FreeBSD, Makes $250k Donation

    Intel is going to more actively engage with the FreeBSD project and they've also made a hefty donation to the FreeBSD Foundation.

BSD and GPL

Filed under
GNU
BSD
Legal
  • Booting FreeBSD 11 with NVMe and ZFS on AMD Ryzen

    We recently took one of our test systems and tried an experiment: could we boot FreeBSD 11 from a NVMe SSD using ZFS root file system using AMD Ryzen. At STH we have many FreeBSD users and developers so when there is a new hardware class out, we tend to try it in FreeBSD and sometimes popular FreeBSD appliance OSes such as pfSense and FreeNAS. You can see an example with our Knights Landing Xeon Phi x200 system booting FreeBSD OSes. In our recent testing with AMD Ryzen we found major installers with the latest CentOS 7.3 and also had issues with Ubuntu crashing using current LTS image kernels. We wanted to see how FreeBSD would fare given it normally lags in terms of hardware support.

  • VMware becomes gold member of Linux Foundation: And what about the GPL?

    As we can read in recent news, VMware has become a gold member of the Linux foundation. That causes - to say the least - very mixed feelings to me.

    One thing to keep in mind: The Linux Foundation is an industry association, it exists to act in the joint interest of it's paying members. It is not a charity, and it does not act for the public good. I know and respect that, while some people sometimes appear to be confused about its function.

    However, allowing an entity like VMware to join, despite their many years long disrespect for the most basic principles of the FOSS Community (such as: Following the GPL and its copyleft principle), really is hard to understand and accept.

    I wouldn't have any issue if VMware would (prior to joining LF) have said: Ok, we had some bad policies in the past, but now we fully comply with the license of the Linux kernel, and we release all derivative/collective works in source code. This would be a positive spin: Acknowledge past issues, resolve the issues, become clean and then publicly underlining your support of Linux by (among other things) joining the Linux Foundation. I'm not one to hold grudges against people who accept their past mistakes, fix the presence and then move on. But no, they haven't fixed any issues.

    They are having one of the worst track records in terms of intentional GPL compliance issues for many years, showing outright disrespect for Linux, the GPL and ultimately the rights of the Linux developers, not resolving those issues and at the same time joining the Linux Foundation? What kind of message sends that?

Distros News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Three Rescue Disks for Your Toolbox

    If you're a SysAdmin, or work anywhere on the Ops side of DevOps, a rescue disc should be an essential part of your arsenal. With a bootable rescue system, either on a CD or on a thumb drive, you can recover a password, detect and remove a rootkit or other malware, repair a Master Boot Record, retrieve data from a damaged drive and more.

    You can build your own, of course. All of the necessary tools are freely available under open source licenses and are included in the repositories of most Linux distributions. But the easier route is to use one of the Linux distributions designed specifically as a rescue disc, and which comes with all of the tools you might need already installed. There are many, but we'll look at three of the most popular. Each includes tools to fix problems on machines running either Linux or Windows.

  • The most awaited distribution in Q2 2017

    The second quarter of 2017 promises to be very interesting.

    Several distributions schedule their release between April and June 2017.

    Apart from two usual competitors that issue their new releases every 6 months, Ubuntu and Fedora, we will see Tails 3.0 and Linux Lite 3.4.

  • Packaging with CPack — on FreeBSD

    Some days of the week, I work on Free Software projects that aren’t ready to see the light yet; they live in my own git repo’s, or wherever. While I have the intention of publishing eventually, I usually want to get things somewhat working before throwing code out there.

    Part of checking if things work is packaging, and installing the stuff on more than one system. Sure, I can build everywhere, or copy around executables, but it struck me that it’d be cool to have packages — you know, installable with the system package manager — for the stuff I make. O yeah, I know flatpak is the new orange, but I’m not that hip. I’ll stick with Debian and FreeBSD packages, thanks.

New Github TOS Causes Anger

Filed under
GNU
BSD
Legal
  • Rational thoughts on the GitHub ToS change

    I woke this morning to Thorsten claiming the new GitHub Terms of Service could require the removal of Free software projects from it. This was followed by joeyh removing everything from github. I hadn’t actually been paying attention, so I went looking for some sort of summary of whether I should be worried and ended up reading the actual ToS instead. TL;DR version: No, I’m not worried and I don’t think you should be either.

    First, a disclaimer. I’m not a lawyer. I have some legal training, but none of what I’m about to say is legal advice. If you’re really worried about the changes then you should engage the services of a professional.

  • what I would ask my lawyers about the new Github TOS

    The Internet saw Github's new TOS yesterday and collectively shrugged.

    That's weird..

    I don't have any lawyers, but the way Github's new TOS is written, I feel I'd need to consult with lawyers to understand how it might affect the license of my software if I hosted it on Github.

    And the license of my software is important to me, because it is the legal framework within which my software lives or dies. If I didn't care about my software, I'd be able to shrug this off, but since I do it seems very important indeed, and not worth taking risks with.

    If I were looking over the TOS with my lawyers, I'd ask these questions...

  • New GitHub Terms of Service r̲e̲q̲u̲i̲r̲e̲ removing many Open Source works from it

    The new Terms of Service of GitHub became effective today, which is quite problematic — there was a review phase, but my reviews pointing out the problems were not answered, and, while the language is somewhat changed from the draft, they became effective immediately.

    Now, the new ToS are not so bad that one immediately must stop using their service for disagreement, but it’s important that certain content may no longer legally be pushed to GitHub. I’ll try to explain which is affected, and why.

    I’m mostly working my way backwards through section D, as that’s where the problems I identified lie, and because this is from easier to harder.

FreeBSD-Based TrueOS Operating System Gets New Jail Tools, Automounting Feature

Filed under
OS
BSD

The developers of the FreeBSD-based TrueOS operating system (formerly PC-BSD) announced the release and general availability of a new stable build versioned 2017-02-22.

Read more

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • LLVM/Clang 4.0 Is Running Late Due To Seven Blocker Bugs

    LLVM 4.0 was supposed to have been released by now, but it's running late due to open blocker bugs.

    Hans Wennborg commented on the mailing list that while the release should have happened on 21 February, serving as release manager, he hasn't tagged the release yet due to open blocker bugs.

  • FreeBSD-Based pfSense 2.3.3 Open-Source Firewall Released with over 100 Changes

    Rubicon Communications' Jim Pingle announced the availability of a new point release to the pfSense 2.3 stable series, which adds over 100 improvements and a bunch of new features.

    Updated to FreeBSD 10.3-RELEASE-p16, the pfSense 2.3.3 maintenance release is here more than seven months after the 2.3.2 update and introduces several new packages, including TFTP Server, LCDproc, cellular, and tinc, a lot of improvements for the OpenVPN and IPsec implementations, as well as numerous stability and security fixes from FreeBSD.

    Dozens of bug fixes are included in pfSense 2.3.3 for WebGUI, graphs and monitoring, gateways and routing, notifications, Dynamic DNS, captive portal, NTP and GPS, DNS, resolver and forwarder, DHCP and DHCPv6 servers, router advertisements, HA and CARP, traffic shaping, firewall, rules, NAT, aliases, states, users, authentication, and privileges.

  • “Hi, I’m jkh and I’m a d**k”

    Yesterday, I was privy to a private email message discussing a topic I care deeply about. I contacted the author and said “You really need to make this public and give this a wider audience.” His response boiled down to “if I wanted it to get a wider audience, I was welcome to do so myself.” So here’s my first ever guest post, from Jordan K Hubbard, one of the founders of the FreeBSD Project. While this discussion focuses on FreeBSD, it’s applicable to any large open source project.

pfSense 2.3.3 RELEASE Now Available!

Filed under
Security
BSD

We are happy to announce the release of pfSense® software version 2.3.3!

This is a maintenance release in the 2.3.x series, bringing numerous stability and bug fixes, fixes for a handful of security issues in the GUI, and a handful of new features. The full list of changes is on the 2.3.3 New Features and Changes page, including a list of FreeBSD and internal security advisories addressed by this release.

This release includes fixes for 101 bugs, 14 Features, and 3 Todo items.

If you haven’t yet caught up on the changes in 2.3.x, check out the Features and Highlights video. Past blog posts have covered some of the changes, such as the performance improvements from tryforward, and the webGUI update.

Read more

Also: NetBSD Accomplishes Reproducible Builds

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME 3.27.3 Released

  • GNOME 3.27.3 released
    GNOME 3.27.3, the third development snapshot in the 3.28 development cycle, is now available. A few more modules have been ported to meson, and lots of development is happening across all modules. To point out a few highlights, dconf-editor is seeing significant work, and evolution has had many bug fixes.
  • GNOME 3.27.3 Brings More Meson Ports, Redesign To DConf Editor
    Matthias Clasen of Red Hat announced the release of GNOME 3.27.3 this weekend. GNOME 3.27.3 is the latest in a string of development releases leading up to the stable GNOME 3.28 debut in March.
  • GNOME 3.28 Desktop Environment Gets Third Development Snapshot, More Meson Ports
    GNOME leader Matthias Clasen announced a few moments ago the availability of the third development snapshot towards the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions. The development cycle of the upcoming GNOME 3.28 desktop environment continues today with the GNOME 3.27.3 milestone, which ports more components to the Meson build system and adds various improvements to various apps and tools, including the Evolution email and calendar client, NetworkManager network connection manager, and dconf-editor.

Review: OnePlus 5T

Have you ever arrived at a party, looked around, and realized you’re totally underdressed? It’s a panic-inducing moment. This nightmare scenario happened to OnePlus earlier this year. Its OnePlus 5 had the brains to match any competing Android device, but next to phones like the Galaxy S8, LG G6, iPhone X, it looked, well, dowdy. With thick, squared off bezels and an eyesore of a home button, it was so last season. For four years, OnePlus has pinned its entire identity to the idea that it sells the phone with the highest specs at the lowest price. Instead of paying $850+ for a fancy phone from the likes of Google or Samsung, you can buy a nearly identical, slightly off-brand OnePlus for $500 or less. It was the phone those in the know would recommend to save a few hundred bucks and still have a brag-worthy device. But you couldn’t brag about the OnePlus 5, especially after some bugs plagued the device. Read more

Android Leftovers

Canonical Releases Small Kernel Patch for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS to Fix a Regression

Last week, Canonical released a kernel update for the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system patching a total of four security issues, including a use-after-free vulnerability in the Netlink subsystem (XFRM), an out-of-bounds read in the GTCO digitizer USB driver, a bug in the associative array implementation, and improper copy-on-write (COW) handling of transparent huge pages. However, it would appear that the respective kernel update also introduced a regression, which apparently prevented the use of the Ceph network file system on machines that upgraded to the new kernel versions. Canonical patched the issue and released a new Linux kernel update that addresses the problem on all Ubuntu 16.04 LTS systems, as well as Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS machines. Read more