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BSD

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • Busy Week: UbuntuBSD, FreeNAS 9.10 Released

    Most of the attention this week has been around the release of UbuntuBSD, which in and of itself is a noble effort for those who want to escape from systemd, as the developers have dubbed it according to Phoronix. This manifestation joins Ubuntu 15.10 Wile E. Coyote — sorry, Wily Werewolf — to the Free BSD 10.1 kernel.

    To its credit, UbuntuBSD uses Xfce as its default desktop. It also joins a list of other marriages between Linux distros and the BSD kernel: Debian GNU/kFreeBSD, ArchBSD (now PacBSD), Gentoo/BSD and others along the FOSS highway. It’s worth a look and we’ll be giving it a test drive sometime soon.

    But for now, there’s a more interesting and significant development in the BSD realm rising on the horizon.

  • AMD Polaris Support Already Lands In LLVM
  • DragonFlyBSD's Radeon Driver Code Up To Linux 3.18 State

    The DragonFlyBSD operating system with its AMD Radeon graphics driver ported from the Linux DRM/KMS code is up to a state equivalent to where it was in the Linux 3.18 kernel.

FreeNAS 9.10 Open-Source Storage Operating System Adds USB 3.0 & Skylake Support

Filed under
Security
BSD

Jordan Hubbard from the FreeNAS project, an open-source initiative to create a powerful, free, secure, and reliable NAS (Network-attached storage) operating system based on BSD technologies, announced the release of FreeNAS 9.10.

FreeNAS 9.10 is the tenth maintenance release in the current stable 9.x series of the project, thus bringing the latest security patches from upstream, support for new devices, as well as several under-the-hood updates. As expected, FreeNAS 9.10 has been rebased on the latest FreeBSD 10.3 RC3 (Release Candidate) release.

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Meet ubuntuBSD, UNIX for Human Beings

Filed under
GNU
Debian
BSD

Today we have the great pleasure of introducing you to a new project that saw the light of the Internet for the first time this past weekend, on March 12, 2016. Meet ubuntuBSD!

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Landed updates in FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD

Some interesting things — for KDE users and developers — have landed in the official FreeBSD ports tree recently.

CMake has updated to 3.5.0. One side effect of CMake updates is that newer policies tend to produce voluminous warning messages when building older software (like kdelibs4-based things, which is all the KDE software in official ports right now). This can make it hard to track down cmake / configure errors amongst the warnings. There’s not much to do there except (slowly) update other ports to set the new (or old) policies explicitly.

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UbuntuBSD Brings Ubuntu Atop The FreeBSD Kernel

Filed under
BSD
Ubuntu

The inaugural release of UbuntuBSD is now available, which the developers have codenamed "Escape From SystemD", and pairs the Ubuntu userspace with the FreeBSD kernel.

Similar to the now-rather-defunct Debian GNU/kFreeBSD that paired the Debian GNU user-space with the FreeBSD kernel rather than the Linux kernel, developers have done the same with Ubuntu and called it UbuntuBSD. This first UbuntuBSD beta release is based off Ubuntu 15.10 Wily Werewolf and the FreeBSD 10.1 kernel.

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FreeBSD Foundation Logo, Website Get New Look

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BSD

There’s a new look at the FreeBSD Foundation, with a new logo and website. The changes are intended to highlight “the ongoing evolution of the Foundation identity and ability to better serve the FreeBSD Project,” according to the post announcing the changes.

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FreeBSD 10.3-RC2 Now Available

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BSD

In preparation for the anticipated FreeBSD 10.3 release later this month, 10.3-RC2 is now available.

Marius Strobl announced the FreeBSD 10.3-RC2 release on Saturday afternoon for all major architectures plus an assortment of ARM boards. FreeBSD 10.3-RC2 fixes a potential data corruption issue with incremental ZFS send, file syncing improvements for hash-based database files, some security issue fixes, and more.

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Exp-run for KDE4 on FreeBSD

Filed under
KDE
BSD

There’s an exp-run going on for KDE4 on FreeBSD right now. That means that the official package-building machines are grinding through the entire ports tree to see what happens. This is part of the regular procedure for big updates — and this is a big one.

While KDE4 as a desktop — with Plasma shell 4 and the old collection of KDE modules like PIM, etc. — is not getting a lot of upstream releases, it does get some updates, and some applications release new versions. This is one reason to continue to update the packages.

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OpenBSD 5.9 Set for May 1 Release; Pre-orders Available

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BSD

For those of you keeping score at home, OpenBSD is like other BSD derivatives, however this derivative is regarded as one of the safest systems due to the OpenBSD team’s attention to security (and could very well be the folks on the receiving end of Linus’ infamous “monkey” quote regarding, um, attention to detail on security issues, but I digress).

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Leftovers: BSD (LLVM 3.8, OpenBSD on VAX)

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BSD
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