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BSD

DragonFlyBSD 4.0 Drops i386 Support, Improves Graphics

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BSD

The much anticipated release of DragonFlyBSD 4.0 is now available.

The biggest "big ticket item" of DragonFlyBSD 4.0 include improving graphics support with the Linux-ported Intel DRM driver now handling Intel "Haswell" graphics complete with OpenGL support, well more than one year after it's been optimized for Linux users. DragonFlyBSD 4.0 is also significant in that it drops 32-bit i386 support in making it 64-bit only for x86 systems. While the DRM driver porting takes a while across all BSD distributions right now, at least DragonFlyBSD developers can take a stand for pushing forward and focusing on 64-bit support rather than 32-bit.

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PC-BSD 10.1 review

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Reviews
BSD

The last PC-BSD release I reviewed was the 9.1 edition, and that was back in December 2012 (see PC-BSD 9.1 preview). That’s almost two years ago, But that’s because I’ve been very disappointed with subsequent releases after that, so I never bothered to write another review, though I was each testing each release privately.

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Linux Vs Unix: The Crucial Differences That Matter To Linux Professionals

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GNU
Linux
BSD

Lately, we hear a lot about Linux — how it’s dominating on servers, how it makes up a large chunk of the smartphone market, and how it’s becoming a highly viable option on the desktop. But Linux didn’t appear out of thin air; before the creation of Linux, and before the rise of Windows, the computing world was dominated by Unix. And for those who don’t know, Linux is very similar to Unix. Since we’ve already looked at the differences between Linux and Windows, what exactly is the difference between Linux and Unix?

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FreeBSD Foundation Receives $1 Million from WhatsApp CEO

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BSD

The FreeBSD project has received a massive $1 million (€800,000) donation from one of the WhatsApp co-founders, Jan Koum, and the developers are more than thrilled at the fact that they have secured their future, at least for a while.

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PC-BSD 10.1-RELEASE Now Available

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BSD

The PC-BSD team is pleased to announce the availability of PC-BSD 10.1 release!

A very special thank you goes out to all the contributors for this release, your help and feedback was greatly appreciated!

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DragonFlyBSD 4.0 RC3 Is Out, Faster DRM Drivers Coming

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BSD

The third release candidate is out for the upcoming DragonFlyBSD 4.0 operating system release.

DragonFlyBSD 4.0 has been in an RC state since last month and uploaded last night was now the third release candidate that brings more updates to the popular BSD derivative.

DragonFlyBSD 4.0 RC2 was released just earlier this week to add procctl() support. The RC3 release has just a few changes around the procctl() system call, a segmentation fault fix, and updating time zone data.

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FreeBSD 10.1 Release Now Available

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BSD

After being set back by only some minor delays, FreeBSD 10.1 stable is now available in released form.

FreeBSD 10.1 brings many new features covered in multiple Phoronix articles but if you're not up to speed on the new release, there's also the 10.1R release notes and the official announcement. Some of our favorite features include the new VT console driver, Bhyve ZFS boot support, UEFI for FreeBSD 64-bit, AutoFS added, and many other package updates and new additions.

Download FreeBSD 10.1-RELEASE from FreeBSD.org.

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OpenBSD Finally Has USB 3.0 Support

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BSD

OpenBSD's latest feature is support for USB 3.0.

For those using OpenBSD, as of last week USB 3.0 support was committed to the operating system. When enabling XHCI for OpenBSD, most USB 3.0 features are working but isochronous transfers go unsupported for now.

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OpenMandriva Lx Is Switching To Clang By Default

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MDV
BSD

While OS X has switched to LLVM's Clang as the default C/C++ compiler and FreeBSD and other BSD distributions have followed in switching to Clang instead of GCC due to its more permissive license, OpenMandriva Lx is one of the first notable Linux distributions set to switch to Clang by default with its next release.

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Systemd again? Debian drops kFreeBSD as official architecture

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Debian
BSD

The Debian GNU/Linux project has decided not to support its GNU/kFreeBSD distribution as an official release for the forthcoming version 8.0 which is better known as Jessie.

GNU/kFreeBSD is one of the numerous Debian architectures that combines the userland of GNU/Linux with a FreeBSD kernel. Debian is the only GNU/Linux distribution that releases with anything other than a Linux kernel.

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Ubuntu Kylin 15.10 Beta 1 Is Out with Updated Software Center, Linux Kernel 4.1 LTS

As part of the release of Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Beta 1 for opt-in flavors, the Ubuntu Kylin team had the pleasure of announcing the immediate availability for download and testing of the first Beta build of the upcoming Ubuntu Kylin 15.10 distro. Read more Also: Kubuntu Wily Beta 1

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Croatian policy encourages open source adoption

Earlier this year, Croatian political party Sustainable Development of Croatia (ORaH) published a new policy that encourages the government to pursue open source solutions, addresses the dangers of vendor lock-in, and insists on open document standards. Best of all, they did it the open source way. Read more

Is Office 365 cheaper than OpenOffice and open source?

Indeed, Microsoft's marketing team published a press release recently saying Office 365 is about 80% cheaper compared to the open source office suite, OpenOffice - with the figures stemming from reports in Italy and the City Council of Pesaro. The Redmond giant claims that to roll out Open Office, Pesaro incurred a one off cost of about €300,000 and had lots of problems with document formatting. But equally how would you convince a public sector organisation to migrate to your cloud services instead of using 'expensive' open source software? The obvious way would be to present a case study from a similar organisation together with a well written report commissioned to an "independent" consultancy firm. At this point your future customer has all the data and justifications required to sign on the dotted line. And some journalists are now presenting this case as fact of Microsoft Office 365 being 80% more economical than open source alternatives. I would argue that this is an isolated case and the PR efforts by big technology vendors, like many other methods, are being used to trick private and public organisations into signing contracts based on data or claims that may be not completely true. Read more