Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

BSD

OpenBSD Development News

Filed under
Development
BSD
  • OpenBSD now has Trapsleds to make life harder for ROPers
  • Historical: My first OpenBSD Hackathon

    I was a nobody. With some encouragement, enough liquid courage to override my imposter syndrome, and a few hours of mentoring, I'm now doing big projects. The next time you're sitting at a table with someone new to your field, ask yourself: how can you encourage them? You just might make the world better.

    Thank you Dale. And thank you Theo.

  • Finish the link-kit job

    We've had the linkkit components in the tree for a while, but it has taken nearly 20 rounds between rpe/tb/myself to get the last few bits finished. So that the link kit is cleanly used at reboot, but also fits in with the practices kernel developers follow.

NetBSD Image for Raspberry Pi Updated to Improve Raspberry Pi 3 Boot Support

Filed under
Linux
BSD

Jun Ebihara of the Japan NetBSD Users' Group is reporting today on Twitter that he managed to release an updated version of the Raspberry Pi image for the NetBSD (evbarm) operating system.

Read more

That's random: OpenBSD adds more kernel security

Filed under
Security
BSD

OpenBSD has a new security feature designed to harden it against kernel-level buffer overruns, the "KARL" (kernel address randomised link).

The changes are described in this note to an OpenBSD developer list penned by founder and lead developer Theo de Raadt.

Read more

FreeNAS 11.0 Released and OpenBSD Server Shown Off

Filed under
BSD
  • FreeNAS 11.0 is Now Here

    After several FreeNAS Release Candidates, FreeNAS 11.0 was released today. This version brings new virtualization and object storage features to the World’s Most Popular Open Source Storage Operating System. FreeNAS 11.0 adds bhyve virtual machines to its popular SAN/NAS, jails, and plugins, letting you use host web-scale VMs on your FreeNAS box. It also gives users S3-compatible object storage services, which turns your FreeNAS box into an S3-compatible server, letting you avoid reliance on the cloud. Click here to view what’s new with FreeNAS 11.0.

  • FreeNAS 11.0 Released

    FreeNAS 11.0 is now officially available, the network attached storage (NAS) centered operating system powered by FreeBSD.

    FreeNAS 11.0 features Bhyve virtualization support from FreeBSD, new hardware support via the FreeBSD 11-STABLE updates, plugin support, and performance improvements (up to around 20% faster than FreeNAS 9.10).

  • My OpenBSD Server (2) - A virtualized network with OpenBSD's vmm

    This time I would like to go a little bit further and extend the server with a network of virtual machines, where each machine can be reached by the name of the subdomain it should represent.

Mixed KDE Applications on FreeBSD

Filed under
KDE
BSD

The KDE Frameworks have been available in FreeBSD for a while now, but we haven’t seen much movement on the desktop environment or the applications front. KDE4 is still the latest you can get from ports. The plasma5/ branch in the KDE FreeBSD ports repository contains all the applications, and KDE Plasma 5 Desktop, and is very up-to-date with KDE releases — but it’s not in official ports, and that makes it a little more difficult than it needs to be to install the latest KDE Software on FreeBSD.

The KDE-FreeBSD team is starting to migrate individual applications to recently-released KF5 versions. That sometimes means letting go of some features: Plasma 5 integration isn’t going to happen until we have Plasma 5 in the official ports tree. But KDevelop 5.1 is a valuable upgrade over 4.7, and the IDE suffers very little (except if you wanted the embedded konsole part).

Read more

FreeBSD-Based TrueOS Gets New Stable Update, Adds Lumina Desktop 1.2.2, More

Filed under
BSD

A new stable update of TrueOS has been published recently as a significant step forward for the FreeBSD-based operating system by adding new functionality and updating many of the core components.

Read more

OpenBSD Daily and FreeBSD 11.1 Beta

Filed under
BSD
  • OpenBSD Daily

    There’s also one more side effect of reading code daily - diffs. It’s easy to spot inconsistencies, outdated code or an incorrect man page.

  • FreeBSD 11.1 Beta Now Available

    The first beta for FreeBSD 11.1 is out right on schedule.

BSD News: Recent Hackathon, Upcoming NetBSD

Filed under
BSD

FreeBSD News: 64-bit Inodes and KDE

Filed under
KDE
BSD
  • FreeBSD Lands Support For 64-bit Inodes (ino64 Project)

    While Linux and other operating systems (including DragonFlyBSD) have supported 64-bit inodes for data structures on file-systems, FreeBSD has been limited to 32-bit. But thanks to the work of many on the ino64 project, FreeBSD now has support for 64-bit inodes while retaining backwards compatibility.

  • KDE FreeBSD CI (2)

    The KDE Continuous Integration system builds KDE software from scratch, straight from the git repositories, and usually from master (or whatever is considered the development branch). It’s been building for Linux for a long time, and has recently been expanded with FreeBSD servers as well. KDE sysadmin has been kind enough to provide two more VMs (with some more compiling “oomph”) so that we can keep up better, and the CI has just been expanded with all of the Plasma products. That means we’re now building KDE Frameworks, and the Plasma desktop.

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Microsoft Linuxwashing and Research Openwashing

today's howtos

Why Everyone should know vim

Vim is an improved version of Vi, a known text editor available by default in UNIX distributions. Another alternative for modal editors is Emacs but they’re so different that I kind of feel they serve different purposes. Both are great, regardless. I don’t feel vim is necessarily a geeky kind of taste or not. Vim introduced modal editing to me and that has changed my life, really. If you have ever tried vim, you may have noticed you have to press “I” or “A” (lower case) to start writing (note: I’m aware there are more ways to start editing but the purpose is not to cover Vim’s functionalities.). The fun part starts once you realize you can associate Insert and Append commands to something. And then editing text is like thinking of what you want the computer to show on the computer instead of struggling where you at before writing. The same goes for other commands which are easily converted to mnemonics and this is what helped getting comfortable with Vim. Note that Emacs does not have this kind of keybindings but they do have a Vim-like mode - Evil (Extensive Vi Layer). More often than not, I just need to think of what I want to accomplish and type the first letters. Like Replace, Visual, Delete, and so on. It is a modal editor after all, meaning it has modes for everything. This is also what increases my productivity when writing files. I just think of my intentions and Vim does the things for me. Read more

Graphics: Intel and Mesa 18.1 RC1 Released

  • Intel 2018Q1 Graphics Stack Recipe
    Last week Intel's Open-Source Technology Center released their latest quarterly "graphics stack recipe" for the Linux desktop. The Intel Graphics Stack Recipe is the company's recommended configuration for an optimal and supported open-source graphics driver experience for their Intel HD/UHD/Iris Graphics found on Intel processors.
  • Mesa 18.1-RC1 Released With The Latest Open-Source 3D Driver Features
    Seemingly flying under our radar is that Mesa 18.1 has already been branched and the first release candidate issued. While the Mesa website hasn't yet been updated for the 18.1 details, Dylan Baker appears to be the release manager for the 18.1 series -- the second quarter of 2018 release stream.