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LLVM/Clang

Filed under
Development
BSD
  • The Radeon Machine Scheduler Will Soon Come To AMDGPU LLVM

    Months after Axel Davy originally posted his patch-set for the SI machine scheduler to enhance the performance of AMD GCN GPUs on the open-source driver, it looks like the code will soon land in the AMDGPU LLVM back-end.

    Axel posted his work on this Southern Islands machine scheduler months ago for AMD's LLVM GPU back-end. As tests showed back in August, this scheduler helps significantly boost the performance for certain workloads. One of the Phoronix readers that tested out this scheduler at the time exclaimed, "The si scheduler is such a huge performance boost! Not only it is faster, but now radeonsi is faster than Catalyst in *all* tests, sometimes by a wide margin!"

  • LLVM / Clang 3.9 Is Now Under Development

    LLVM Clang 3.8 has been branched from trunk, thus making LLVM Clang 3.9 the new version under development.

    LLVM developers were right on time for branching LLVM 3.8.0 and they are now preparing for the LLVM 3.8 release candidate. A LLVM 3.8 RC2 release is planned meanwhile for 27 January while the official release of LLVM 3.8.0 is expected around mid-February.

FreeBSD Foundation Takes Right Steps

Filed under
BSD

First things first: I’m the new kid on the BSD block. While in the process of still figuring things out on PC-BSD — dang that Synaptics! — and finding a place to contribute in the community, I have no real handle on the nuances of the inner workings of the wider BSD community. To my self-promoting credit, I am a quick study and the learning curve is not as difficult as I imagined. On the whole, I like what I see in those contributing to BSD, especially in the way of eagerness to help new users.

However, when Randi Harper decided to bail on participation in FreeBSD as she outlined in her blog, it raises the question, “Where have we seen this before?” Taking a step back, it raises the question, “Why does this keep happening in FOSS communities?”

Before we begin to answer those questions — and answers to those questions extend far beyond this commentary — I’m less interested in the “he said, she said” of the past than in finding workable solutions to permanently removing the 500-pound gorilla in the room — the quarter-ton simian of harassment and lack of proper channels to adequately address it.

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Also: LLVM 3.7.1 Released, Restores API/ABI Compatibility With LLVM 3.6/3.8

The Developer Formerly Known as FreeBSDGirl

Filed under
BSD
  • The Developer Formerly Known as FreeBSDGirl

    I’m still sad I had to leave. That is a heartbreak that will probably never go away. I’ll miss the conferences and hanging out with so many incredibly talented people to discuss an operating system and open source project that I loved. This project helped me get to where I am today. I’m not advocating that minorities don’t join FreeBSD, but I hope those in charge of the project read this and understand that they’ve got to do better. I hope someone else helps them find their way.

  • randi vs xmj

    If a volunteer project has a volunteer who is honestly so dysfunctional that he doesn’t understand why he is offensive, the project does not need him. And the volunteer needs to get help until he’s capable of behaving in a civilized manner.

  • The Empathy Gap, and Why Women are Treated Badly in Open Source Communities

    Some years ago, I contributed $1000 to be one of the seed funders of the Ada Initiative, which worked to assist women in participating in Open Source projects. That worked out for several years, and the organization had sort of an ugly meltdown in their last year that is best forgotten. There was something really admirable about the Ada Initiative in its good days, which is that it stuck to one message, stuck to the positive in helping women enter and continue in communities in which they were under-represented, and wasn’t anti-male. That’s the way we should do it.

  • Women, Let This Email Plugin Teach You to Be Confident Like A Man

    Sorry, I’m no expert, but have you ever, like, just noticed that women inject many kind of undermining phrases in their day-to-day speech?

BSD: A Brief Look Back at 2015

Filed under
BSD

This is the time of year when we look back and go, “Wow. How did this all ever happen?” Or something to that effect. And after about a month of PC-BSD daily use, the verdict so far (subject to appeal) is overwhelmingly positive with a couple of bumps (e.g., someday I will turn off tap-to-click on my touchpad).

Of course when I look back on the year, I can only look back as far as the time I have been using BSD. It wouldn’t be fair to go all the way back — one time back in the aughts, by some miracle, I got NetBSD to run on a PowerBook G3 until I updated the system and then poof — so this retrospective goes as far back as the month I’ve been using PC-BSD.

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BSD Unix-like OS is Resurrected for Embedded IoT Market

Filed under
BSD

It took two decades, but BSD -- the operating system that dominated the Unix world during the 1980s and 1990s before being supplanted by the open source Linux kernel -- is now ready for embedded computing. That's according to the RetroBSD project, which has announced success running BSD on modern embedded hardware.

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DragonFlyBSD Rebases Its Intel Kernel Graphics Driver Against Linux 4.0

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

DragonFlyBSD's Francois Tigeot has done some more great work in allowing their open-source Intel graphics driver to be more featureful and comparable to the Linux i915 kernel DRM driver for which it is based.

While DragonFly's i915 DRM driver started out as woefully outdated compared to the upstream Linux kernel code, the work done by Tigeot and others is quite close to re-basing against the latest mainline code. With patches published recently, the DragonFlyBSD driver would now be comparable to what's in the Linux 4.0 kernel.

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FreeBSD and Linux servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

Linux server distributions get compared all the time. And in the end, the discussion typically ends up around CentOS (from RHEL) and Ubuntu (from Debian). Why is this? When Rackspace discusses Linux server options, many more distributions are mentioned: Gentoo, Arch, Fedora, etc. Let's focus on Gentoo and Arch.

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Also: The Most Popular BSD Stories Of 2015

A BSD Wish List for 2016

Filed under
BSD

First things first: I know that the wide number of variants in the BSD family are primarily aimed at servers. That said, it’s clearly understandable that with the exception of PC-BSD and BSD variants like GhostBSD, desktop/laptop users are not the primary focus in the BSD constellation. I get that, and regardless I am still using it for about 80 percent of my overall computing needs, and still using it on a daily basis on my go-to daily laptop.

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BSD-Based pfSense 2.2.6 Firewall Patches WebGUI and OpenSSL Security Issues

Filed under
BSD

Electric Sheep Fencing LLC., through Chris Buechler, has been glad to announce the immediate availability for download of the sixth maintenance release of the stable pfSense 2.2 FreeBSD-based firewall distribution.

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Bash and FreeNAS Logos

Filed under
GNU
BSD
  • Bash logo

    I received a very generous offer to create a new logo and donate it for the project's use. The benefactor is Justin Dorfman, and he has been very patient to wait for me to select from among a number of good alternatives (part of what made it so tough).

  • Linux Predictions 2016, FreeNAS Logo Contest & More…

    FreeNAS Logo Contest: Okay, artists, get those colored pencils sharpened, those brushes cleaned and ready, because you have an assignment — that logo isn’t going to design itself. FreeNAS — “founded in 2005 on the guiding principle that network storage software should be available to the public at no cost and free of license restrictions” according to its site — has initiated a logo contest, urging the community to contribute artwork to become a part of FreeNAS history.

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