BSD

Free *BSDs such as OpenBSD, FreeBSD, and BSD-licensed software

Set Up PC-BSD v1.4 beta

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BSD
HowTos

This article describes how to set up PC-BSD v1.4 beta. PC-BSD is released under the BSD license. PC-BSD is a desktop operating system based on FreeBSD. It uses KDE as its desktop environment.

OpenBSD: Stealing Versus Sharing Code

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BSD

kernelTRAP: OpenBSD project creator Theo de Raadt detailed his concerns regarding BSD-licensed code and Dual-BSD/GPL-licensed code being re-licensed under only the GPL as previously discussed here, "honestly, I was greatly troubled by the situation, because even people like Alan Cox were giving other Linux developers advice to ... break the law."

NetBSD and Lighttpd help put three 200 MHz PCs put to good use

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BSD

pinderkent.blogsavy: I’m a staunch supporter of putting old, but working, computers to good use again. Personally, I have repurposed numerous systems back into production after they were deemed to be too old, and replaced with newer hardware. One of my favourite tools for enabling this is NetBSD.

OpenBSD: Software Freedom

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BSD

kernelTRAP: OpenBSD creator Theo de Raadt highlighted a recent commit to the NetBSD source tree saying, "if anyone had any doubt that our insistence on freedom was important, just read this."

PC-BSD Meets Software Piracy?

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BSD

OSWeekly: I have been a fan of PC-BSD for sometime now; however, it was after discovering this page that had me disturbed. Using PC-BSD's awesome packaging methods, the webmaster of this site has apparently packaged some applications that might cause some licensing concerns.

Linux vs. BSD, What's the Difference?

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BSD

linuxdevcenter: Ubuntu is known as Linux for Human Beings. PC-BSD, on the other hand, "has been designed with the casual computer user in mind.

Interview: Matthew Dillon

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Interviews
BSD

kernelTRAP: Matthew Dillon created DragonFly BSD in June of 2003 as a fork of the FreeBSD 4.8 codebase. In this interview, Matthew discusses his incentive for starting a new BSD project and briefly compares DragonFly to FreeBSD and the other BSD projects. He goes on to discuss the new features in today's DragonFly 1.10 release.

OpenBSD team mocked at first ever ‘Pwnie’ awards

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BSD

zdnet blogs: The OpenBSD team has won an award for the most spectacular mishandling of a critical security vulnerability. Here’s why:

OpenBSD: Intel Core 2 Bugs

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BSD

kernelTRAP: Theo de Raadt described an active effort by OpenBSD developers to work around "serious bugs in Intel's Core 2 cpu". He went on to explain, "these processors are buggy as hell, and some of these bugs don't just cause development/debugging problems, but will *ASSUREDLY* be exploitable from userland code."

OpenBSD 4.1 review

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BSD

softwareinreview: OpenBSD 4.1 was released on May 1 with its usual mix of new hardware support and enhanced operating system features. OpenBSD releases generally represent a large collection of small changes plus a few new administration and networking tools. Beyond the standard "many little changes," the big news with 4.1 is a working native port of OpenOffice.org, the elimination of the Simtech StrongARM "cats" architecture from active development, and improved greylisting capabilities in the spamd spam filter.

Also: Using OpenBSD 4.1

24-hour test drive: PC-BSD

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BSD

arstechnica: PC-BSD is not a Linux distribution, but rather what could be considered among the first major FreeBSD-based distributions to live outside of the official FreeBSD. Like most distributions, it has implemented certain features in a way that attempts to distinguish it from the competition, and I will focus mostly on these differences.

Review: FreeSBIE 2.0.1

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BSD

Raiden's Realm: From great anticipation to utter misery to mixed reactions. That in general sums up my experience with FreeSBIE 2.0.1.

BSD revisited

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BSD

opensourcelearning: It’s been a few years since I dabbled in BSD. Linux has it’s roots in Unix, but BSD is Unix. But why is BSD appealing?

OpenBSD: Free As In Air

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BSD

kernelTRAP: "OpenBSD is free as in air," Theo de Raadt stated in a recent thread on the OpenBSD -misc mailing list. The discussion began with a note that the Open Sound System had recently been "open sourced" under the GPLv2 and CDDL leading Theo to comment.

Linux configure point to point tunneling PPTP VPN client for Microsoft PPTP vpn server

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Linux
Hardware
Software
Security
BSD
Ubuntu
HowTos

With this tip you will be able to work from home using VPN and that too from Linux / FreeBSD system for the proprietary Microsoft Point-to-Point vpn server.

Set the shell prompt and themes in Linux /UNIX Terminal

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KDE
Linux
Gentoo
Software
Slack
SUSE
BSD
Ubuntu
HowTos

Most of us work with a shell prompt. By default most Linux distro displays hostname and current working directory as a prompt. You can easily customize your prompt to display information important to you. You change look and feel by adding colors.

PC-BSD 1.3

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Reviews
BSD

free-bees.co.uk: PC-BSD should make an interesting change for two main reasons. Firstly, it uses a BSD kernel, as opposed to the Linux kernel used in distributions such as Debian and Slackware. Secondly, its main method of installing new programs seems to be closer to that of Windows than apt. So, let's see if its claims of user friendliness are accurate.

PC-BSD 1.3.4 Review

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Reviews
BSD

All about Linux: FreeBSD along with OpenBSD and NetBSD form the triumvirate of BSD operating systems. Traditionally these BSDs are server centric operating systems - ie. those which are tuned to be run on a server rather than to be used by the end user as a desktop. Still, with a bit of tweaking and configuration, all the three of them can be used as viable desktop operating systems.

Linux too vanilla? Try this

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BSD

the Inquirer: I'VE BEEN TRYING to reinstall my old laptop recently. It's a battered old Thinkpad i1200 series from about 2001. No kernel newer than 2.6.15 will run on it. I've tried FreeBSD before but found it a real trial to get it installed and working. But PC-BSD is a /very/ different beast.

Virtual Hosting With vsftpd And PostgreSQL

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BSD
HowTos

This document describes how to install a vsftpd server that uses virtual users from a PostgreSQL database instead of real system users. I could not find any tutorial like that on the internet, so when that configuration finally worked for me, I decided to publish it. The documentation is based on FreeBSD 6.2 which I was recently forced to use (I usually use Debian). Nevertheless the document should be suitable for almost any Linux distribution as well (may require very small amendments)

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