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FreeNAS 8 review

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BSD

linuxuser.co.uk: FreeNAS is a popular FreeBSD-based operating system for network-attached storage (NAS). Thanks to the easy-to-use web interface, you don’t have to know anything about the FreeBSD base under the hood to share your files…

Google discontinues specialised Linux and BSD search pages

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Linux
Google
BSD

h-online.com: Google has discontinued its specialised Linux and BSD search pages. Users are instead now redirected to google.com/webhp, a standard search page.

Open source identity: FreeNAS 8's Josh Paetzel

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Interviews
BSD

computerworld.com.au: FreeNAS is an open source operating system based on FreeBSD and, as its name implies, designed for networked storage. The project recently celebrated the release of FreeNAS 8, which racked up some 43,000 downloads in the first 48 hours after its release.

BSD Mag June 2011 Issue: NanoBSD and Alix Released

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BSD

The June issue of BSD Magazine is online and ready to go. Highlights include: Introduction to OpenSSL, Success story: OpenBSD as an Enterprise Desktop, and Installing FreeBSD with PC-SYSINSTALL.

FreeSBIE: Is Devil Live or Dead?

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BSD

linuxblog.darkduck.com: First impression from FreeSBIE was not so nice. It took extremely long time to boot. Though, that might be my own fault - my CD-RW is in far from ideal condition.

Did You Know You Can Try BSD With VirtualBSD?

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BSD

all-things-linux.blogspot: VirtualBSD 8.1 was released on or around 4/01/2011 and it basically gives you a pre-defined FreeBSD 8.1 installation with Xfce 4.6 and a range of applications in a virtual machine.

REVIEW: GhostBSD 2.0 (LiveCD)

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BSD

openbytes.wordpress: I would expect it’s a welcome release for established GhostBSD users but new users may find that it’s neither polished or packaged as fully as they would like.

Review: GhostBSD 2.0

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BSD

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: Recently, GhostBSD 2.0 was released. What is GhostBSD? It's a FreeBSD distribution that uses GNOME as its sole DE and aims to make FreeBSD more user-friendly, similar to what Ubuntu has done to Debian.

Linux distributor security list destroyed after hacker compromise

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Linux
Security
BSD

zdnet.com: Hackers have compromised a private e-mail list used by Linux and BSD distributors to share information on embargoed security vulnerabilities and used a backdoor to sniff e-mail traffic, according to the moderator of the list.

PC-BSD 8.2 review

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BSD

linuxbsdos.com: PC-BSD is a desktop distribution based on FreeBSD. The latest stable release, PC-BSD 8.2, was made available for public download last month. This article presents a review of this latest release.

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Linux tutorial website

Hi guys, here you have a website that covers Linux basics: http://linux-bible.com. Most of the examples are from Ubuntu.

Today in Techrights

Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro

Importantly, there are a handful of programs that are on Edubuntu that UberStudent doesn’t have, such as KAlgebra, Kazium, KGeography, and Marble. Instead, UberStudent has a smaller collection of applications but it does include some useful items when it comes to writing papers that Edubuntu does not have. So ultimately, Edubuntu includes more programs that are information-heavy, while UberStudent includes more tools that can aid students in their studies but doesn’t directly give them any sort of information. Read more

Zotac Nvidia Jetson TK1 review

The Jetson TK1, Nvidia’s first development board to be marketed at the general public, has taken a circuitous route to our shores. Unveiled at the company’s Graphics Technology Conference earlier this year, the board launched in the US at a headline-grabbing price of $192 but its international release was hampered by export regulations. Zotac, already an Nvidia partner for its graphics hardware, volunteered to sort things out and has partnered with Maplin to bring the board to the UK. In doing so, however, the price has become a little muddled. $192 – a clever dollar per GPU core – has become £199.99. Compared to Maplin’s other single-board computer, the sub-£30 Raspberry Pi, it’s a high-end item that could find itself priced out of the reach of the company’s usual customers. Read more