BSD

Free *BSDs such as OpenBSD, FreeBSD, and BSD-licensed software

PC-BSD Day 9: Communication

Filed under
KDE
BSD

ruminations: For the larger part of the last 12 months I have been using Ubuntu and the GNOME desktop. Now it’s time to take a closer look at the KDE desktop and really use the applications that were designed for it.

PC-BSD Day 8: Demons and Pirates?

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: It may seem like I am only busy with software management in this first week and the impression is correct. The graphical workspace -KDE by default on PC-BSD- is something I will focus on later, but first I wanted to delve into something I had no prior knowledge of.

PC- BSD Day 7: Ports of Call

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: Today I spend most of day on a Windows box. Alas, but my boss won’t allow anything but Windows on the workfloor. When the time to play is in short supply I automatically focus on the tools that are created to make life easy. That focus was on graphical front-ends for the ports collection.

PC-BSD Day 6: Getting the job done

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: With the basics of the pkg_add system in my grasp it was time to get some work done. I have a presentation later this week and I use mindmaps to set up the structure. Sad to say there still is no serious replacement for MindManager (which also doesn’t allow itself to run under Wine), so I settled for Freemind.

Tip of the Trade: PC-BSD

Filed under
BSD

serverwatch: FreeBSD users sometimes gaze quizzically at Linux users and wonder why they do everything the hard way. Although FreeBSD and Linux are close cousins with a considerable number of similarities under the hood, some major differences separate them.

PC-BSD Day 5: BSD Certification

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: The fresh install of PC-BSD was a very simple task. There was no need to make backups of important files and under Vmware the creation of new virtual computer is simply a matter of following the step in the wizard. I decided not to use disk 2 to install for instance Firefox or OpenOffice.org, but just to install the basic system that disk 1 provides. That didn’t take long.

PC-BSD Day 4: Making a fresh start

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: The first few days I have been busy with installing and trying to install new software. Maybe I am weird and a software glutton, but I like my install base to be fat. The more software to play with, the better. Fooling around with the PBI’s, the commandline based install via pkg_add and testing out KPorts as a graphical frontend for the ports collection resulted in some mixed results.

PC-BSD Day 3: Angels 1 - Demons 3

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: Between BSD and Linux there are plenty of similarities and differences from a technological, judicial and moral viewpoint. No doubt the various crowds could go head to head over those differences (which they actually do from time to time), but there is one area where BSD beats Linux hands down consistently. Its mascotte.

OpenBSD: The BSD License

Filed under
BSD

kernelTRAP: During the continuing debates regarding the legality and fairness of re-licensing BSD licensed code, it was asked why the BSD license couldn't be extracted from Windows applications known to include BSD licensed code. OpenBSD creator Theo de Raadt explained, "what you ran strings on is not 'source code'. It was the binary.

PC-BSD Day 1: extending the system

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: On this first day with PC-BSD I sat down to extend the system. For one, I was curious whether I could play my MP3 files out of the box and -if not- how easy it was to remedy that. Secondly, I wanted to install a program for offline blogging.

BSD Revisited: PC-BSD 1.4 RC

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: PC-BSD is based on FreeBSD 6.2 but promises a more enduser-friendly experience. It was bought by iXsystems in October 2006. FreeBSD has it’s own ports and packages system to install, manage and remove software.

Set Up PC-BSD v1.4 beta

Filed under
BSD
HowTos

This article describes how to set up PC-BSD v1.4 beta. PC-BSD is released under the BSD license. PC-BSD is a desktop operating system based on FreeBSD. It uses KDE as its desktop environment.

OpenBSD: Stealing Versus Sharing Code

Filed under
BSD

kernelTRAP: OpenBSD project creator Theo de Raadt detailed his concerns regarding BSD-licensed code and Dual-BSD/GPL-licensed code being re-licensed under only the GPL as previously discussed here, "honestly, I was greatly troubled by the situation, because even people like Alan Cox were giving other Linux developers advice to ... break the law."

NetBSD and Lighttpd help put three 200 MHz PCs put to good use

Filed under
BSD

pinderkent.blogsavy: I’m a staunch supporter of putting old, but working, computers to good use again. Personally, I have repurposed numerous systems back into production after they were deemed to be too old, and replaced with newer hardware. One of my favourite tools for enabling this is NetBSD.

OpenBSD: Software Freedom

Filed under
BSD

kernelTRAP: OpenBSD creator Theo de Raadt highlighted a recent commit to the NetBSD source tree saying, "if anyone had any doubt that our insistence on freedom was important, just read this."

PC-BSD Meets Software Piracy?

Filed under
BSD

OSWeekly: I have been a fan of PC-BSD for sometime now; however, it was after discovering this page that had me disturbed. Using PC-BSD's awesome packaging methods, the webmaster of this site has apparently packaged some applications that might cause some licensing concerns.

Linux vs. BSD, What's the Difference?

Filed under
BSD

linuxdevcenter: Ubuntu is known as Linux for Human Beings. PC-BSD, on the other hand, "has been designed with the casual computer user in mind.

Interview: Matthew Dillon

Filed under
Interviews
BSD

kernelTRAP: Matthew Dillon created DragonFly BSD in June of 2003 as a fork of the FreeBSD 4.8 codebase. In this interview, Matthew discusses his incentive for starting a new BSD project and briefly compares DragonFly to FreeBSD and the other BSD projects. He goes on to discuss the new features in today's DragonFly 1.10 release.

OpenBSD team mocked at first ever ‘Pwnie’ awards

Filed under
BSD

zdnet blogs: The OpenBSD team has won an award for the most spectacular mishandling of a critical security vulnerability. Here’s why:

OpenBSD: Intel Core 2 Bugs

Filed under
BSD

kernelTRAP: Theo de Raadt described an active effort by OpenBSD developers to work around "serious bugs in Intel's Core 2 cpu". He went on to explain, "these processors are buggy as hell, and some of these bugs don't just cause development/debugging problems, but will *ASSUREDLY* be exploitable from userland code."

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