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BSD

BSD: Contributing to FreeBSD and Release of DragonFlyBSD 4.8.1

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BSD
  • Contributing to FreeBSD

     

    The FreeBSD Testing Project is building an automated test suite for the entire operating system. They have a whole mess of work to do. There’s only four people on the team, so each additional person that contributes can have a serious impact. They have tutorials on how to write tests, and sample tests.

  • DragonFlyBSD 4.8.1 Released, Updates Intel DRM Against Linux 4.7.10

    DragonFlyBSD 4.8.1 has been released by Justin Sherrill with various minor updates -- particularly for Intel DRM graphics and other kernel improvements -- over the recent v4.8 milestone.

BSD: OPNsense 17.7, OpenBSD and LLVM

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BSD

OPNsense 17.7 released

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BSD

For more than two and a half years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, HardenedBSD security, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

We are writing to you today to announce the final release of version 17.7 “Free Fox”, which, over the course of the last 6 months, includes highlights such as SafeStack application hardening, the Realtek re(4) driver for better network stability, a Quagga plugin with broad routing protocol support and the Unbound resolver as the new default. Additionally, translations for Czech, Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese and German have been completed for the first time during this development cycle.

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BSD/UNIX: Trying OpenIndiana Hipster On The Core i9 7900X and 'End' of Bitrig

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BSD
  • Trying OpenIndiana Hipster On The Core i9 7900X

    Following the Linux and BSD multi-threaded tests on the Intel Core i9 7900X, I next decided to try this system with the Solaris-based OpenIndiana. Sadly, it didn't end well.

    With various BSDs working fine on the Core i9 7900X box paired with the NVMe storage, MSI X299 SLI PLUS motherboard, etc, I figured OpenIndiana would play fine. Sadly, I was wrong.

  • Bitrig: The Short-Lived OpenBSD Fork

    Bitrig, the operating system that forked OpenBSD back in 2012, is no longer being developed.

    Bitrig saw its initial release in 2014 but it's been relatively quiet since. In fact, pretty much forgotten on my end until seeing an LLVM commit this week mentioning Bitrig is dead and has been merged back into OpenBSD.

    Further showing the project is no more is the GitHub project area showing no more work since 2016.

BSD: TrueOS and OpenBSD mandoc

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BSD
  • Milestone Complete! OpenRC conversion

    The OpenRC conversion project is done! Over one thousand script/port conversions are complete, and all will be available in the TrueOS UNSTABLE and STABLE tracks soon. The project wants to extend a huge thank you to all those who contributed to completing this milestone, and a special thank you to contributors ZackaryWelch and elarge011 for doing the lion’s share of the work.

  • TrueOS Finishes Porting Scripts To OpenRC

    The TrueOS BSD distribution has finished porting over more than one thousand FreeBSD RC scripts into OpenRC format for this dependency-based init system.

    This year the TrueOS crew has been working on migrating to the OpenRC init system for better boot performance, easier configuration, better organization of configuration files, more reliable service status, etc. Popular services had been in OpenRC form already but now they have finished porting over more than 1,000 other scripts for OpenRC on TrueOS.

  • mandoc-1.14.2 released

     

    With the improved mandoc features, only twenty-five out of the ten thousand software packages in the OpenBSD ports tree still need groff to format their manual pages.

FreeBSD 11.1 Released

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BSD
  • FreeBSD 11.1 Operating System Debuts to Support 2nd Generation Microsoft Hyper-V

    The FreeBSD Project announced today the release and immediate availability of the first incremental update to the FreeBSD 11 operating system series, FreeBSD 11.1.

    It's been more than nine months since FreeBSD 11 was released as the latest and most advanced version of the widely-used and most popular BSD operating system on the market, and now, FreeBSD 11.1 is here with a bunch of new features across multiple components, as well as all the latest security and bug fixes.

  • FreeBSD 11.1 Debuts With LLVM/Clang 4, ZFS Improvements

    FreeBSD 11.1 is now available as the first point release to FreeBSD 11.

  • FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE Announcement

    The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE. This is the second release of the stable/11 branch.

BSD and Programming: OpenBSD, Development Style, and GCC/C++

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Development
GNU
BSD
  • OpenBSD kernel address randomized link

    A less than two-month-old project for OpenBSD, kernel address space randomized link (KARL), has turned the kernel into an object that is randomized on every boot. Instead of the code being stored in the same location for every boot of a given kernel, each boot will be unique. Unlike Linux's kernel address space layout randomization (KASLR), which randomizes the base address for all of the kernel code on each boot, KARL individually randomizes the object files that get linked into the binary. That means that a single information leak of a function address from the kernel does not leak information about the location of all other functions.

    Theo de Raadt first posted about the idea on the OpenBSD tech mailing list on May 30. He described the current layout of the OpenBSD kernel code, which is effectively the boot code and assembly runtime (in locore.o), followed by the kernel .o files in a fixed order. His post had some changes that would split out the assembly runtime from locore.o and link it and all of the kernel .o files in a random order. The only piece that would be placed at a known address would be locore.o; it would be followed by a randomly sized gap, then by the kernel text that has its .o files arranged in a random order. There would also be random gaps before other sections (i.e. .rodata, .data, and .bss) that are placed after the kernel text.

  • openbsd changes of note 625
  • moving to https

     

    There is some security benefit, of course, but really it’s all about the speed. I want flak to be as fast as possible, thus we need to be using the fastest protocol.  

  • Stop writing code like we're in the '90s: a practical approach (PART Sleepy

    A lot of criticisms come from users that probably wrote Java code when it was born.

  • GCC Begins Preparing For C++20 With -std=c++2a

pfSense 2.3.4-p1 Open-Source Firewall Update Brings Security Fixes for OpenVPN

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BSD

A new security and bug fix maintenance update just landed today for the pfSense 2.3.4 stable release of the open-source and free firewall distribution based on the FreeBSD technologies.

The pfSense 2.3.4-p1 patch is being released two and a half months after the launch of pfSense 2.3.4, and it looks like it attempts to inject new security fixes in pfSense and several of its components, including OpenVPN, as well as to fix various bugs that have been reported during this time. For example, it fixes Hover Dynamic DNS updates to be able to verify the SSL peer.

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BSD: OpenBSD, Benchmarking LLVM/Clang, and AMD Zen Scheduler Model Lands In LLVM

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BSD
  • Blog about my blog

     

    I want to try it again, and this time I decided to create a self-hosted blog. Something that runs on my own server and with httpd, the web server that I wrote for OpenBSD.  

    [...]

    i That's why I decided to write my articles, including this one, in Markdown and use another tool such as lowdown to generate the XML pages for sblg.

     

  • Benchmarking LLVM/Clang's New AMD Zen Scheduler Model

    Just prior to LLVM 5.0 being branched yesterday, the AMD Zen scheduler model finally landed in LLVM and has the potential of boosting the performance of generated binaries targeting AMD's Zen "znver1" architecture. Here are some benchmarks of LLVM Clang 4.0 compared to the latest LLVM Clang compiler code when testing with both generic x86-64 optimizations and then optimized builds for the first-generation Zen CPUs, tested on a Ryzen 7 processor.

  • AMD Zen Scheduler Model Lands In LLVM, Makes It For LLVM 5.0

    It was coming down to the wire for the new AMD Zen scheduler model in LLVM 5.0 but now it's managed to land just hours before the LLVM 5.0 branching.

    The new Zen "znver1" scheduler model for LLVM was published by AMD in patch form last week and now this morning it's been merged to mainline LLVM. Funny enough, thanks to an Intel developer with commit rights to LLVM due to the AMD contributor not having access.

BSD: OPNsense RC1, TrueNAS X10, LLVM and More

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BSD
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Openwashing: Facebook, Microsoft/Adobe and More

Hyperthreading From Intel Seen as Dodgy, Buggy

  • Intel Hyper Threading Performance With A Core i7 On Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
    Following the news yesterday of OpenBSD disabling Intel Hyper Threading by default within its OS over security concerns and plans to disable Simultaneous Multi Threading for other processors/architectures too, here are some fresh Intel HT benchmarks albeit on Ubuntu Linux. The OpenBSD developer involved characterized HT/SMT as "doesn't necessarily have a positive effect on performance; it highly depends on the workload. In all likelihood it will actually slow down most workloads if you have a CPU with more than two cores." So here are some benchmarks using a current-generation Intel Core i7 8700K six-core processor with Hyper Threading.
  • SMT Disabled by Default in -current
  • OpenBSD Will Disable Intel Hyper-Threading To Avoid Spectre-Like Exploits
    OpenBSD, an open source operating system that focuses on security, announced that it will disable Intel’s Hyper-Threading (HT) feature so that attackers can no longer employ Spectre-like cache timing attacks.
  • Intel’s hyperthreading blocked on OpenBSD amid hints of new Spectre-like bugs
    The maintainer of open source Unix-like operating system, OpenBSD, has announced that it will disable hyperthreading on Intel CPUs because of security concerns. It claims that simultaneous multithreading creates a potential new attack vector for Spectre-like exploits, and plans to expand its disabling of multithreading technologies to other chip manufacturers in the near future.

Programming/Development: ISO C++, Rust, FBGraphics and So-called 'DevOps'

  • Trip Report: C++ Standards Meeting in Rapperswil, June 2018
    A couple of weeks ago I attended a meeting of the ISO C++ Standards Committee (also known as WG21) in Rapperswil, Switzerland. This was the second committee meeting in 2018; you can find my reports on preceding meetings here (March 2018, Jacksonville) and here (November 2017, Albuquerque), and earlier ones linked from those. These reports, particularly the Jacksonville one, provide useful context for this post. At this meeting, the committee was focused full-steam on C++20, including advancing several significant features — such as Ranges, Modules, Coroutines, and Executors — for possible inclusion in C++20, with a secondary focus on in-flight Technical Specifications such as the Parallelism TS v2, and the Reflection TS.
  • Proposal for a staged RFC process
    I consider Rust’s RFC process one of our great accomplishments, but it’s no secret that it has a few flaws. At its best, the RFC offers an opportunity for collaborative design that is really exciting to be a part of. At its worst, it can devolve into bickering without any real motion towards consensus. If you’ve not done so already, I strongly recommend reading aturon’s excellent blog posts on this topic. The RFC process has also evolved somewhat organically over time. What began as “just open a pull request on GitHub” has moved into a process with a number of formal and informal stages (described below). I think it’s a good time for us to take a step back and see if we can refine those stages into something that works better for everyone. This blog post describes a proposal that arose over some discussions at the Mo
  • C gfx library for the Linux framebuffer with parallelism support
    FBGraphics was made to produce fullscreen pixels effects easily with non-accelerated framebuffer by leveraging multi-core processors, it is a bit like a software GPU (much less complex and featured!), the initial target platform is a Raspberry PI 3B and extend to the NanoPI (and many others embedded devices), the library should just work with many others devices with a Linux framebuffer altough there is at the moment some restrictions on the supported framebuffer format (24 bits).
  • 16 blogs and newsletters to follow for DevOps practitioners

Brave/Mozilla News

  • Deterministic Firefox Builds
    As of Firefox 60, the build environment for official Firefox Linux builds switched from CentOS to Debian. As part of the transition, we overhauled how the build environment for Firefox is constructed. We now populate the environment from deterministic package snapshots and are much more stringent about dependencies and operations being deterministic and reproducible. The end result is that the build environment for Firefox is deterministic enough to enable Firefox itself to be built deterministically.
  • Brave Launches User Trials for Opt-In Ads That Reward Viewers
    We’ve been busy building our new Basic Attention Token (BAT) platform, which includes a new consent-based digital advertising model that benefits users, publishers, and advertisers. Our first phase started last Fall with the integration of BAT into Brave Payments, and enabled users to anonymously distribute contributions to their favorite publishers and creators.
  • Get Paid For Watching Ads: Brave Browser Announces Opt-in Trials
    Brave, the web browser which garnered a huge fan following, predominantly for its ad blocking feature, and depriving advertisers of confiscating private data by blocking trackers is in the news again. And this time, users can earn some cash. In a blog post, Brave announced that it will be conducting voluntary testing of their new ad model in which they will showcase at least 250 pre-packaged ads to users who will sign up for their early access version. Thus, offering a small amount of money in the form of micropayments.