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BSD

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • Busy Week: UbuntuBSD, FreeNAS 9.10 Released

    Most of the attention this week has been around the release of UbuntuBSD, which in and of itself is a noble effort for those who want to escape from systemd, as the developers have dubbed it according to Phoronix. This manifestation joins Ubuntu 15.10 Wile E. Coyote — sorry, Wily Werewolf — to the Free BSD 10.1 kernel.

    To its credit, UbuntuBSD uses Xfce as its default desktop. It also joins a list of other marriages between Linux distros and the BSD kernel: Debian GNU/kFreeBSD, ArchBSD (now PacBSD), Gentoo/BSD and others along the FOSS highway. It’s worth a look and we’ll be giving it a test drive sometime soon.

    But for now, there’s a more interesting and significant development in the BSD realm rising on the horizon.

  • AMD Polaris Support Already Lands In LLVM
  • DragonFlyBSD's Radeon Driver Code Up To Linux 3.18 State

    The DragonFlyBSD operating system with its AMD Radeon graphics driver ported from the Linux DRM/KMS code is up to a state equivalent to where it was in the Linux 3.18 kernel.

FreeNAS 9.10 Open-Source Storage Operating System Adds USB 3.0 & Skylake Support

Filed under
Security
BSD

Jordan Hubbard from the FreeNAS project, an open-source initiative to create a powerful, free, secure, and reliable NAS (Network-attached storage) operating system based on BSD technologies, announced the release of FreeNAS 9.10.

FreeNAS 9.10 is the tenth maintenance release in the current stable 9.x series of the project, thus bringing the latest security patches from upstream, support for new devices, as well as several under-the-hood updates. As expected, FreeNAS 9.10 has been rebased on the latest FreeBSD 10.3 RC3 (Release Candidate) release.

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Meet ubuntuBSD, UNIX for Human Beings

Filed under
GNU
Debian
BSD

Today we have the great pleasure of introducing you to a new project that saw the light of the Internet for the first time this past weekend, on March 12, 2016. Meet ubuntuBSD!

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Landed updates in FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD

Some interesting things — for KDE users and developers — have landed in the official FreeBSD ports tree recently.

CMake has updated to 3.5.0. One side effect of CMake updates is that newer policies tend to produce voluminous warning messages when building older software (like kdelibs4-based things, which is all the KDE software in official ports right now). This can make it hard to track down cmake / configure errors amongst the warnings. There’s not much to do there except (slowly) update other ports to set the new (or old) policies explicitly.

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UbuntuBSD Brings Ubuntu Atop The FreeBSD Kernel

Filed under
BSD
Ubuntu

The inaugural release of UbuntuBSD is now available, which the developers have codenamed "Escape From SystemD", and pairs the Ubuntu userspace with the FreeBSD kernel.

Similar to the now-rather-defunct Debian GNU/kFreeBSD that paired the Debian GNU user-space with the FreeBSD kernel rather than the Linux kernel, developers have done the same with Ubuntu and called it UbuntuBSD. This first UbuntuBSD beta release is based off Ubuntu 15.10 Wily Werewolf and the FreeBSD 10.1 kernel.

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FreeBSD Foundation Logo, Website Get New Look

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BSD

There’s a new look at the FreeBSD Foundation, with a new logo and website. The changes are intended to highlight “the ongoing evolution of the Foundation identity and ability to better serve the FreeBSD Project,” according to the post announcing the changes.

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FreeBSD 10.3-RC2 Now Available

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BSD

In preparation for the anticipated FreeBSD 10.3 release later this month, 10.3-RC2 is now available.

Marius Strobl announced the FreeBSD 10.3-RC2 release on Saturday afternoon for all major architectures plus an assortment of ARM boards. FreeBSD 10.3-RC2 fixes a potential data corruption issue with incremental ZFS send, file syncing improvements for hash-based database files, some security issue fixes, and more.

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Exp-run for KDE4 on FreeBSD

Filed under
KDE
BSD

There’s an exp-run going on for KDE4 on FreeBSD right now. That means that the official package-building machines are grinding through the entire ports tree to see what happens. This is part of the regular procedure for big updates — and this is a big one.

While KDE4 as a desktop — with Plasma shell 4 and the old collection of KDE modules like PIM, etc. — is not getting a lot of upstream releases, it does get some updates, and some applications release new versions. This is one reason to continue to update the packages.

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OpenBSD 5.9 Set for May 1 Release; Pre-orders Available

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BSD

For those of you keeping score at home, OpenBSD is like other BSD derivatives, however this derivative is regarded as one of the safest systems due to the OpenBSD team’s attention to security (and could very well be the folks on the receiving end of Linus’ infamous “monkey” quote regarding, um, attention to detail on security issues, but I digress).

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Leftovers: BSD (LLVM 3.8, OpenBSD on VAX)

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BSD
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More in Tux Machines

Kernel News: Linux 4.10 in SparkyLinux, Wayland 1.13.0, and Weston 2.0 RC2

  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Lands in SparkyLinux's Unstable Repo, Here's How to Install It
    The trend of offering users the most recent Linux kernel release continues today with SparkyLinux, an open-source, Debian-based distribution that always ships with the latest GNU/Linux technologies and software versions. SparkyLinux appears to be the third distro to offer its users the ability to install the recently released Linux 4.10 kernel, after Linux Lite and Ubuntu, as the developers announced earlier that the Linux kernel 4.10 packages are now available from the unstable repository.
  • Wayland 1.13.0 Display Server Officially Released, Wayland 1.14 Lands in June
    Bryce Harrington, a Senior Open Source Developer at Samsung, announced today the release and general availability of the Wayland 1.13.0 for GNU/Linux distributions that already adopted the next-generation display server.next-generation display server. Wayland 1.13.0 has entered development in the first days of the year, but the first Alpha build arrived at the end of January, along with the Alpha version of the Weston 2.0 compositor, including most of the new features that are present in this final release that you'll be able to install on your Linux-based operating systems in the coming days.
  • Weston 2.0 RC2 Wayland Compositor Arrives With Last Minute Fixes
    While Wayland 1.13 was released today, Bryce Harrington today opted against releasing the Weston 2.0 reference compositor and instead issue a second release candidate. Weston 2.0 is the next version of this "playground" for Wayland compositor technologies since the new output configuration API had broke the ABI, necessitating a break from the same versioning as Wayland.
  • [ANNOUNCE] weston 1.99.94

KDE Leftovers

  • Fedora 25 KDE: disappointing experience
    Fedora is not a frequent guest on the review deck of Linux notes from DarkDuck blog. The most recent review was of Fedora 22 back in July 2015. That was a review of the GNOME version, the most native for Fedora. You are probably aware of the tight link between the GNOME project and RedHat, the Fedora Project main sponsor.
  • [Video] Ubuntu 17.04 Unity 8 - KDE apps native on Mir
  • Plasma in a Snap?
    Shortly before FOSDEM, Aleix Pol asked if I had ever put Plasma in a Snap. While I was a bit perplexed by the notion itself, I also found this a rather interesting idea. So, the past couple of weeks I spent a bit of time here and there on trying to see if it is possible.
  • QStringView Diaries: Advances in QStringLiteral
    This is the first in a series of blog posts on QStringView, the std::u16string_view equivalent for Qt. You can read about QStringView in my original post to the Qt development mailing-list, follow its status by tracking the “qstringview” topic on Gerrit and learn about string views in general in Marshall Clow’s CppCon 2015 talk, aptly named “string_view”.
  • Making Movies with QML
    One of the interesting things about working with Qt is seeing all the unexpected ways our users use the APIs we create. Last year I got a bug report requesting an API to set a custom frame rate for QML animations when using QQuickRenderControl. The reason was that the user was using QQuickRenderControl as an engine to render video output from Qt Quick, and if your target was say 24 frames per second, the animations were not smooth because of how the default animation driver behaves. So inspired by this use case I decided to take a stab at creating such an example myself.
  • How to Create a Look and Feel Theme
  • United Desktop Theme for KDE Plasma 5.9
  • KDE Talks at FOSDEM
    The continuation of the original talk from Dirk Hohndel and Linus Torvalds about the port of Subsurface from Gtk to Qt, now with mobile in mind.

SteamVR for Linux, Benchmarks of HITMAN on NVIDIA

  • SteamVR for Linux is now officially in Beta
    Valve have put up SteamVR for Linux officially in Beta form and they are keen to stress that this is a development release. You will need to run the latest Steam Beta Client for it to work at all, so be sure to opt-in if you want to play around with it.
  • Valve Publishes A SteamVR Developer Build For Linux
    Valve has begun rolling out their SteamVR Linux support by announcing today a beta/developer build of their VR support for Linux. Valve's SteamVR for Linux page was updated today to reflect the build becoming public via the Steam beta channel, "This is a development release. It is intended to allow developers to start creating SteamVR content for Linux platforms. Limited hardware support is provided, and pre-release drivers are required. Linux support is currently only available in the "beta" branch, make sure you are using SteamVR[beta] before reporting issues."
  • HITMAN Linux Benchmarks On 12 NVIDIA GPUs
    Last week Feral Interactive released the much anticipated port of HITMAN for Linux. While at first it didn't look like this Linux game port would work out for our benchmarking requirements, thanks to Feral it does indeed work for another interesting Linux gaming test perspective. For our initial HITMAN Linux benchmarks are tests from 12 NVIDIA GeForce GPUs while our Radeon tests will come tomorrow.

Meet Flint OS, a Chromium OS Fork for Raspberry Pi & PCs That Runs Android Apps

Will Smith from Flint Innovations Limited is informing Softpedia today about their up and coming Linux-based operating system for PCs and Raspberry Pi devices, Flint OS, based on the open-source Chromium OS project. These days, we see more and more developers and entrepreneurs launching new operating systems based on Chromium OS, which Google uses with much success for its Chrome OS on many Chromebooks that you can purchase today. But Flint OS is somehow a bit special, not only because it provides support for both Raspberry Pi SBCs and x86 computers with either Intel or Nvidia GPUs, but because it uses Android apps. Read more Also: KaOS 2017.02 Is Out with Linux 4.9.10, KDE Plasma 5.9.2, and X.Org Server 1.19.1