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BSD

Clang Is Now Self-Hosting On Linux/FreeBSD SPARC64

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BSD

Thanks to Jakob's work on Sparcv9 ABI in Clang and recent changes to Sparc code generator, I am happy to announce that Clang can self host itself on Linux/Sparc64 and on FreeBSD/Sparc64.

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OpenSSH 6.5 released

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Software
BSD

This is a feature-focused release. New features: * ssh(1), sshd(8): Add support for key exchange using elliptic-curve Diffie Hellman in Daniel Bernstein's Curve25519. This key exchange method is the default when both the client and server support it.

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FreeBSD Open-Source OS Comes to the PC-BSD Desktop

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BSD

Linux isn't the only open-source operating system, and it isn't the only one with both server and desktop components either. The FreeBSD Project is one of the earliest open-source operating system projects, with roots connecting it to the original open-source BSD Unix work performed at the University of California at Berkeley. On Jan. 20, FreeBSD 10 debuted, providing server users with multiple performance and virtualization improvements. While FreeBSD itself could potentially be used as a desktop system, the PC-BSD open-source project is the home base for FreeBSD as a desktop operating system.

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My 10 Minute Experience With PC-BSD 10.0

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BSD

With FreeBSD 10.0 having been released and the final release of the PC-BSD 10.0 coming this week, I decided to try out the PC-BSD 10.0-RC5 ahead of the final release. While I intended to run some benchmarks of FreeBSD/PC-BSD 10.0 against its predecessor and compared to Linux distributions, this initial PC-BSD 10.0 encounter was cut short after about ten minutes.

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PC-BSD 10.0-RC5 Now Available

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BSD

This will likely be our LAST RC before issuing the 10.0-FINAL release in a week or so. Please report any outstanding issues to our bug database.

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WHEW! OpenBSD won't CloseBSD (for now) after $100,000 cash windfall

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BSD

“To all of you who have donated, please allow me to give you a huge ‘thank you’,” OpenBSD developer Bob Beck wrote here. “We have in one week gone from being in a dire situation to having a commitment of approximately $100,000 in donations to the Foundation.”

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LLVM Point Releases Look Like They Will Finally Happen

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BSD

It looks like there's finally going to be stable point releases of the LLVM compiler infrastructure for pushing out bug-fixes quicker, whether you're using the Clang C/C++ compiler or depending upon LLVM for your GPU driver compiler back-end.

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FreeBSD 10.0 Has Finally Been Released

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BSD

FreeBSD 10.0 uses Clang as the default compiler in place of GCC, TRIM support is available for SSDs with ZFS as are other ZFS file-system improvements, AMD Radeon KMS driver support, and a wide-range of packages have been updated. I have already written at length about the best FreeBSD 10 features and other interesting features so check out the dozens of FreeBSD 10.0 articles on Phoronix for more information.

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Romanian Bitcoin baron 'stumps up $20k to keep OpenBSD's lights on'

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BSD

OpenBSD is important because it’s widely used in firewalls, other edge servers, email, DNS and intrusion detection servers for its security. It’s also included in a number of popular third-party packages that include SQL Lite, BIND, Sendmail and the Lynx web browser. ®

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Urgent Request for Funding OpenBSD HQ's Electricity

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BSD

OpenBSD supports a wide range of hardware architectures, and for practical and logistical reasons there are few places in the world that have them all in one place except OpenBSD headquarters, see eg this picture, which shows a subset of the machines involved in building OpenBSD releases.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu vs. Fedora Linux On Lenovo's X1 Carbon With Core i7 Broadwell

The latest distribution I tried on the X1 Carbon (and the OS I'll ultimately use for running the X1 Carbon in a production capacity as my main system) is Fedora 21. Fedora 21 booted up on the X1 Carbon wonderfully without any issues aside from the trackpoint button clicks being wonky (though the button clicks in the corner of the trackpad works fine). Fedora 21 with Wayland also ran fine on this system with Intel HD Graphics 5500. Overall, it was a pleasant experience without any major problems. Read more

Plex Media Server Review – The Ultimate Steaming Server

Plex Media Server is a media center application that allows users to stream video and audio content to local and remote clients, such as mobile devices or smart TVs. We now take a closer look at this powerful server and client and see what's the fuss all about. Read more

CoreOS Co-Founder Alex Polvi Talks Containers, Rocket vs. Docker, and More

CoreOS has gained notoriety over the past few years as the creator of a new Linux distribution designed for massive, Google-scale server deployments. The company's star has risen along with the popularity of Linux containers -- a key component of CoreOS -- and their open source components are being widely incorporated by companies on the bleeding edge of distributed computing. Read more

Linux vs Windows

I've been working with both Linux and MS Windows 7 lately. Yes, I have a good excuse for using MS Windows: I have started working on Ruby video tutorials, and I needed to demonstrate installation of ruby, notepad++, and configuration thereof in the MS Windows environment. Well, it's been illuminating, switching back and forth between Kubuntu 14.10 and Microsoft Windows 7. The desktops are pretty much equal. However, Linux KDE has stolen a march on the Windows 7 desktop regarding configurability of the desktop experience--of course, I'm vastly more experienced with Linux and the KDE desktop. Also, Linux is better on multitasking. Often, MS Windows 7 would almost freeze a few moments when working on several tasks. I also had some issues getting my sound card working well with Windows 7--which is an older sound-blaster (5.1) card. But, I've had similar problems with getting audio in the Linux environment working too. However, the online help and assistance you can get with Linux seems much better. Purchasing a screen recorder and a basic video editor with MS Windows 7 was also interesting. Although reading countless reviews, I had a difficult time getting a cheap screen recorder that was good on both the video and audio portions of screen recording, and would work properly on 1920x1080 recordings. And all the "free stuff" you download for Microsoft Windows is cripple ware. The Windows software environment is based on deception: "It's Free!". After downloading and installing, you find it won't do nearly what you wanted until you send them $xx.xx! I almost bought "Camtasia Studio", which, by all accounts, is good screen recording and editing software. But I couldn't justify spending $299.99 on software I was only going to use for producing 10 minutes of video demonstration. I know the preceding paragraph seems somewhat naive, but after using only Linux for so long, I haven't faced anything like this for many years. The one good thing to say about MS Windows 7 is that Notepad++ is a good "totally freeware" text editor. The remainder of the video tutorial series will be done solely in Linux--with Kdenlive 0.9.10 (where I finally learned to do "Pan and Zoom") and SimpleScreenRecorder 0.3.3. I'm going to send both of them a few $$. It's good to be back.