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BSD

UbuntuBSD

Filed under
BSD
Ubuntu

In the world of free software, you have more choices. Because your system is made up of free, reusable components, you could cobble together a similar system that meets your needs. And, you can release it so other users can benefit too.

That's exactly what happened in the case of UbuntuBSD. When Canonical decided to adopt systemd in Ubuntu, some users were far from pleased. Jon Boden was one of them. But, thanks to the flexibility of FOSS software, he was able to build his own version of Ubuntu without systemd—and his solution is quite intriguing.

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Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • UbuntuBSD

    Regardless of your position on the systemd debate, projects such as the UbuntuBSD distribution offer a wider range of options to the FOSS community at large. And, there are cases where a BSD kernel will provide better performance than Linux.

  • [pfSense] 2.3 Release Candidate now available!

    We are proud to announce pfSense® software version 2.3 Release Candidate is now available!

    The most significant changes in this release are a rewrite of the webGUI utilizing Bootstrap, and the underlying system being converted entirely to FreeBSD pkg (including the base system and kernel). The pkg conversion enables us to update pieces of the system individually going forward, rather than the monolithic updates of the past.

  • LLVM Adds Intel Lakemont CPU Support

    The LLVM compiler infrastructure now has support for Intel's Lakemont processor.

    Lakemont is the codename for the Quark processors that include the Quark X1000 SoC. The Lakemont hardware has been available for a while now but continues to be used in different applications and Intel continues improving its support.

OpenBSD 5.9 released (early!)

Filed under
BSD

The release of OpenBSD 5.9, previously scheduled for the usual May 1st, has just been officially announced!

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Also: OpenBSD 5.9 Released

Leftovers: More BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • Why OpenBSD?

    Using OpenBSD as my operating system of choice is the conclusion of my now 20 years journey into UNIX-like systems. I've been using FreeBSD from 2000 to 2005 as my sole operating system at the time (both on servers and workstations), from 4.1 to the end of the 4.x series. I have fond memories of that period, and that's probably the main reason why I've been diving again into the BSDs during the last few years. Prior to that, I had been running Slackware, which in retrospective was very BSD-like, since January 1996.

    When I first installed OpenBSD, two things struck me. The installation process was both easy and fast, as the OpenBSD installer, a plain shell script, is very minimalistic and uncluttered. It is in fact the fastest installation process I've ever experienced, and it made a really positive first impression. The second one is the quality of the documentation. Not only does the OpenBSD project produces high quality code, they are also very good at documenting it. And it's not only man pages and documentation, presentations and papers also reflect that.

  • New routing table code (ART) enabled in -current

    With this commit, mpi@ enabled the new ART routing table implementation, which paves way for more MP network stack improvements down the line.

  • bsdtalk263 - joshua stein and Brandon Mercer

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • Busy Week: UbuntuBSD, FreeNAS 9.10 Released

    Most of the attention this week has been around the release of UbuntuBSD, which in and of itself is a noble effort for those who want to escape from systemd, as the developers have dubbed it according to Phoronix. This manifestation joins Ubuntu 15.10 Wile E. Coyote — sorry, Wily Werewolf — to the Free BSD 10.1 kernel.

    To its credit, UbuntuBSD uses Xfce as its default desktop. It also joins a list of other marriages between Linux distros and the BSD kernel: Debian GNU/kFreeBSD, ArchBSD (now PacBSD), Gentoo/BSD and others along the FOSS highway. It’s worth a look and we’ll be giving it a test drive sometime soon.

    But for now, there’s a more interesting and significant development in the BSD realm rising on the horizon.

  • AMD Polaris Support Already Lands In LLVM
  • DragonFlyBSD's Radeon Driver Code Up To Linux 3.18 State

    The DragonFlyBSD operating system with its AMD Radeon graphics driver ported from the Linux DRM/KMS code is up to a state equivalent to where it was in the Linux 3.18 kernel.

FreeNAS 9.10 Open-Source Storage Operating System Adds USB 3.0 & Skylake Support

Filed under
Security
BSD

Jordan Hubbard from the FreeNAS project, an open-source initiative to create a powerful, free, secure, and reliable NAS (Network-attached storage) operating system based on BSD technologies, announced the release of FreeNAS 9.10.

FreeNAS 9.10 is the tenth maintenance release in the current stable 9.x series of the project, thus bringing the latest security patches from upstream, support for new devices, as well as several under-the-hood updates. As expected, FreeNAS 9.10 has been rebased on the latest FreeBSD 10.3 RC3 (Release Candidate) release.

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Meet ubuntuBSD, UNIX for Human Beings

Filed under
GNU
Debian
BSD

Today we have the great pleasure of introducing you to a new project that saw the light of the Internet for the first time this past weekend, on March 12, 2016. Meet ubuntuBSD!

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Landed updates in FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD

Some interesting things — for KDE users and developers — have landed in the official FreeBSD ports tree recently.

CMake has updated to 3.5.0. One side effect of CMake updates is that newer policies tend to produce voluminous warning messages when building older software (like kdelibs4-based things, which is all the KDE software in official ports right now). This can make it hard to track down cmake / configure errors amongst the warnings. There’s not much to do there except (slowly) update other ports to set the new (or old) policies explicitly.

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UbuntuBSD Brings Ubuntu Atop The FreeBSD Kernel

Filed under
BSD
Ubuntu

The inaugural release of UbuntuBSD is now available, which the developers have codenamed "Escape From SystemD", and pairs the Ubuntu userspace with the FreeBSD kernel.

Similar to the now-rather-defunct Debian GNU/kFreeBSD that paired the Debian GNU user-space with the FreeBSD kernel rather than the Linux kernel, developers have done the same with Ubuntu and called it UbuntuBSD. This first UbuntuBSD beta release is based off Ubuntu 15.10 Wily Werewolf and the FreeBSD 10.1 kernel.

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FreeBSD Foundation Logo, Website Get New Look

Filed under
BSD

There’s a new look at the FreeBSD Foundation, with a new logo and website. The changes are intended to highlight “the ongoing evolution of the Foundation identity and ability to better serve the FreeBSD Project,” according to the post announcing the changes.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.