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BSD

FreeBSD 10.3 Beta 2 Brings UEFI Fixes & More

Filed under
BSD

One week after the first FreeBSD 10.3 beta, FreeBSD 10.3 Beta 2 is now available with more fixes.

Over the past week were some fixes/improvements around FreeBSD's UEFI support, "The UEFI ZFS loader has been updated to support the latest ZFS Boot Environment (BE) loader menu features" and "The UEFI boot loader received several improvements: /boot/config and /boot.config files now are adhered to, multi device boot support works and command line argument parsing has been added."

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Lumina Desktop Getting Ready for FreeBSD 11.0

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BSD

Ken Moore, the lead developer for the BSD-based Lumina Desktop Environment, announced that another step towards the release of a full-fledged desktop environment for BSD variants (and Linux distros, for that matter) has been achieved with the release of version 0.8.8 yesterday.

For those of you keeping score at home, the Lumina Desktop Environment — let’s just call it Lumina for short — is a lightweight, XDG-compliant, BSD-licensed desktop environment focusing on getting work done while minimizing system overhead. Specifically designed for PC-BSD and FreeBSD, it has also been ported to many other BSD variants and Linux distros. Lumina is based on the Qt graphical toolkit and the Fluxbox window manager, and uses a small number of X utilities for various tasks.

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PC-BSD Devs Release Lumina Desktop 0.8.8 Environment with Interface Tweaks

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BSD

PC-BSD's Ken Moore today, February 10, reports the release and general availability of the Lumina Desktop 0.8.8 environment for the project's PC-BSD computer operating system.

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FreeBSD 10.3 Now In Beta

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BSD

FreeBSD developers have released today their first official development media for the upcoming FreeBSD 10.3.

FreeBSD 10.3 Beta 1 is now available from their FTP server.

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Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • FreeBSD Ended 2015 With A Lot Of Open-Source Progress

    The FreeBSD project has issued their quarterly status report for Q4'2015 to highlight all the progress they made in ending out 2015.

  • OpenBSD on a MacBookPro8,2 with Intel GPU

    Some MacBooks have two graphics cards, the specific one this post is about is a MacBookPro8,2 (15-inch, Late2011) with an Intel HD Graphics 3000 and an AMD Radeon HD 6750M.

    If you boot any OS into legacy BIOS mode (only option supported by – at this time – most recent release version 5.8 of OpenBSD), it is always the Radeon card that gets activated (except for Windows OS, where Bootcamp/drivers should handle the automatic switching just like in Mac OS).

    You need an external USB WLAN card (or something else, if you want network access), because the internal one is not supported by OpenBSD.

BSD Impact: LLVM, Haiku OS

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BSD
  • LLVM Continues To Dominate Across Many Operating Systems, Software Projects

    LLVM gets GPU exposure via NVIDIA's CUDA, Mesa LLVMpipe, LunarGLASS, the AMDGPU open-source driver stack, SPIR / SPIR-V, and a majority of the OpenCL implementations in the world. Web projects around LLVM include Google's Portable Native Client (PNaCl), WebKit FTL JIT, EmScripten, and WebAssembly, among others.

  • Haiku OS Powered By BSD? It's A Possibility

    François Revol presented at FOSDEM this weekend about the prospects of Haiku OS ever becoming a BSD distribution. Haiku OS, the well known BeOS re-implementation, does currently rely upon some BSD components but more integration is possible.

    Haiku OS is the project that continues to be developed for more than the past decade as a open-source operating system compatible with BeOS.

Exploiting The Full Potential Of ZFS On BSD Systems

Filed under
BSD

With ZFS file-system support continuing to spread via OpenZFS, you may be one of the many out there still wondering about the benefits of ZFS.

Allan Jude, a FreeBSD server administrator, is presenting at FOSDEM this weekend about "interesting things you can do with ZFS." His presentation covers ZFS features like data integrity checking, multi-level cache, copy-on-write behavior, snapshots, quotas, transparent compression, incremental replication, and more.

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Distribution News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • FreeBSD-Powered Firewall Distro OPNsense 16.1 Released

    OPNsense, the open-source firewall project powered by FreeBSD that began as a fork of pfSense, is out with a new release.

  • BackBox Linux 4.5 OS comes with pre-installed new hacking tools

    The release of BackBox Linux 4.5 has been announced by the developers of the BackBox Linux operating system, which assures to bring a new kernel and lots of upgraded packages, plus it is also immediately available for download.

  • Manjaro 15.12 (Capella) Receives New Update with Important Kernel Fixes

    The Manjaro developers have pushed out the door yet another update for Manjaro 15.12 (Capella), and it brings a lot of important fixes.

    This is the fifth update for Manjaro 15.12 (Capella), and it looks like the developers will continue to provide this packs for the coming months. If the past is any indication, we'll probably get about 5 or 6 update packages if everything goes according to plan.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get the Latest KDE, LibreOffice and Snapper Updates

    openSUSE Tumbleweed users are being informed today, January 28, by Mr. Douglas DeMaio of openSUSE Project about the availability of multiple updates for their beloved operating systems.

    openSUSE Tumbleweed is the rolling edition of the acclaimed openSUSE Linux operating system, and it would appear that it received a bunch of new updates lately, for various KDE technologies, as well as for some of the most prominent software applications that are preinstalled in the distribution.

  • Monthly News – January 2016

    Hello everyone! Before I start with the news, I’d like to share a few words about the donations we received in December. You sent us an unprecedented number of donations for an all-time high total of $16,736! We had to check the stats twice to make sure this wasn’t a mistake. This follows the release of Linux Mint 17.3, so not only does it help our funding, it’s also extremely gratifying and motivating for us. Many many thanks to the 714 people who supported us, and to our partners and sponsors for being here for us.

PC-BSD / FreeBSD 11.0-CURRENT Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

Last week I had plans to run some fresh FreeBSD vs. Linux gaming benchmarks using the FreeBSD's Linux software binary compatibility layer.

For those that don't know, FreeBSD boasts a Linux binary compatibility initiative. Five years ago I did some Linux gaming tests on FreeBSD within FreeBSD: A Faster Platform For Linux Gaming Than Linux?. I wanted to do some modern tests atop the latest FreeBSD/PC-BSD code and the latest NVIDIA driver.

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Linux Foundation, OpenIoT, SCALE 14x, and BSD

Filed under
Linux
BSD
  • Linux Foundation announces 2016 events, adds OpenIoT

    The Linux Foundation announced its 2016 event calendar, and issued a CFP for the Apr. 4-6 Embedded Linux Conference, which features an OpenIoT Summit.

    It’s once again time to check your calendar to see if you can carve out a few days to network with your geeky peers — the Linux Foundation has revealed its extensive lineup of 2016 events. In 2015, LF events attracted “nearly 15,000 developers, maintainers, sysadmins, thought leaders, business executives and other industry professionals from more than 3,100 organizations across 85 countries,” says the nonprofit Linux advocacy organization.

  • BSD at SCALE 14x

    As I may have mentioned during the SCALE 14x coverage, one of the disadvantages of the glorious burden of working for a great event such as SCALE is that I don’t get out of the media room enough. The fact is, I can’t — herding the cats known as the tech media and processing various social media posts around the event keeps me in the room.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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