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FreeBSD 10.1 Has The New VT Driver, Hardware Improvements

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BSD

Released this past week was the first beta of FreeBSD 10.1. If you haven't yet had time to explore this development release, there's a lot of improvements over FreeBSD 10.0.

Here's some of the features that interest us the most about this forthcoming FreeBSD 10 update:

- The driver for FreeBSD's new VT console has been added. The new VT hasn't been enabled by default but for now still requires setting a special parameter.

- The ported-from-Linux Radeon DRM/KMS driver now has support for 32-bit ioctls so 32-bit OpenGL applications are able to run on a 64-bit FreeBSD system.

- Various hardware-related improvements from Turbo Boost enabled Intel CPUs to PowerPC 970 CPUs to Atom Silvermont to Apple books saw different changes.

- Bhyve virtualization improvements.

Find out more about the recent FreeBSD 10 changes via the stable release notes. FreeBSD 10.1 is expected for an official unveiling on 29 October.

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FreeBSD 10.1-BETA1 Now Available

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BSD

The first BETA build of the 10.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available
on the FTP servers for the amd64, armv6, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64
and sparc64 architectures.

The image checksums follow at the end of this email.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/releases/ISO-IMAGES/10.1/

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CD-Sized Image Of BSD-Based TrueOS Released For Servers

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BSD

In announcing their quarterly package updates that bring a wide assortment of improvements, the PC-BSD crew shared they managed to make a CD-sized image of their TrueOS server operating system.

TrueOS is the PC-BSD-based installation option intended for servers. While PC-BSD is aimed at an easy BSD desktop experience, TrueOS is aimed at providing a easy server experience while providing many of the same components as found in PC-BSD, which in turn is derived from the FreeBSD package base.

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LLVM 3.5 Is Finally Available For Download

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Development
BSD

LLVM 3.5 is now available for fans just not looking for a more liberally licensed compiler but for those dependent upon AMD's GPU LLVM compiler back-end and the other innovative use-cases provided by the LLVM stack.

While no official announcement has yet to hit the mailing lists, LLVM 3.5 and its sub-projects doing 3.5 releases are now available via the download page. LLVM 3.5 brings many new features ranging from better support of new C++ standards to improved back-end compiler targets. Benchmarks on conventional x86_64 Linux targets have shown LLVM/Clang 3.5 performing well but the in-development GCC 5.0 still performing better.

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HardenedBSD: The Latest BSD Project That Aims To Boost Security

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Security
BSD

HardenedBSD is the latest BSD distribution writing into Phoronix to share its work.

HardenedBSD isn't some radical new BSD operating system but rather it's working on being a security-enhanced version of FreeBSD. HardenedBSD is just about providing security enhancements on top of the FreeBSD code-base. This initiative just started this summer by Oliver Pinter and Shawn Webb.

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GCC 5.0 Adds DragonFlyBSD Support

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GNU
BSD

The latest addition to GCC 5's growing list of features is official support for DragonFlyBSD on i386 and x86_64 architectures.

Up to now a DragonFlyBSD developer had been maintaining his own out-of-tree patches that add support for the DragonFlyBSD target and complete ADA front-end support to all four major BSDs. A few months ago John Marino, the developer maintaining the patches, began working to mainline them to provide out-of-the-box support for C, C++, Objective-C, and Fortran.

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LLVM Clang 3.5 Brings Some Compiler Performance Improvements

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Development
BSD

If all goes well, LLVM 3.5 will be released today. While we have already delivered some LLVM/Clang benchmarks of the 3.5 SVN code, over the days ahead we will be delivering more benchmarks of the updated compiler stack -- including looking at its performance against the in-development GCC 5.0. For getting this latest series of compiler benchmarking at Phoronix started, here's some fresh numbers of LLVM Clang 3.4 compared to a recent release candidate of LLVM Clang 3.5.

This article is using a CompuLab Intense-PC with Intel Core i7 3517UE Ivy Bridge processor for LLVM Clang 3.4 vs. LLVM Clang 3.5 benchmarking. The host system was Ubuntu 14.04 x86_64 and was running off the Linux 3.17 development kernel. Both compilers were built in their optimized release mode (--disable-assertions --enable-optimized) for the core-avx-i CPU. Aside from switching out LLVM Clang 3.4 for LLVM Clang 3.5 RC4, no other system changes were made.

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GhostBSD 4 preview

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BSD

GhostBSD is a desktop distribution that’s based on FreeBSD. The project started out with support for several desktop environments (Gnome, Mate, XFCE, LXDE, and Openbox), but has since become a MATE-only distribution.

The next stable version will be GhostBSD 4, which should be released within the next few months. Meanwhile The second release candidate was made available for download a few days ago. This article shows what the distribution has to offer, which, at this stage of its development, is not a whole lot.

GhostBSD has its own graphical package manager, but compared to the graphical installer of PC-BSD, another FreeBSD-based desktop distribution, it is very lite, feature-wise.

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PfSense 2.1.5 Is a Free and Powerful FreeBSD-Based Firewall Operating System

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BSD

PfSense is a free network firewall distribution based on the FreeBSD, it comes with a custom kernel, and a few quite powerful applications that should make its users’ life a lot easier. Most of the firewall distros are Linux-based, but PfSense is a little bit different and is using FreeBSD. Regular users won't feel anything out of the ordinary, but it's an interesting choice for the base.

The developers of PfSense are also saying that their distro has been successful in replacing a number of commercial firewalls such as Check Point, Cisco PIX, Cisco ASA, Juniper, Sonicwall, Netgear, Watchguard, Astar, and others.

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Community chest: Storage firms need to pay open-source debts

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Linux
OSS
BSD

Linux and *BSD have completely changed the storage market. They are the core of so many storage products, allowing startups and established vendors alike to bring new products to the market more rapidly than previously possible.

Almost every vendor I talk to these days has built their system on top of these and then there are the number of vendors who are using Samba implementations for their NAS functionality. Sometimes they move on from Samba but almost all version 1 NAS boxen are built on top of it.

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More in Tux Machines

LILO Boot-Loader Development To Cease At End Of Year

While most of you probably haven't used the LILO bootloader in years in place of GRUB(2), the developer of "LInux LOader" intends to cease development at the end of the year. This summer's intern, Eric Griffith, pointed out today an undated message on the LILO homepage about the bootloader project planning to end development at the end of 2015. Read more

Systemd Takes Over su, FCC Bans Open Source Firmware

Paul Carroty posted Friday of the news that Lennart Poettering merged an 'su' command replacement into systemd and Fedora Rawhide - coming to a Linux system near you next. Elsewhere, Hackaday.com's Brian Benchoff said new FCC regulations just killed Open Source firmware replacement and Phoronix.com today reported that LILO is being abandoned. Several polls caught my eye today as did the new Linux workstation security checklist. Read more

Accelerating Scientific Analysis with the SciDB Open Source Database System

Science is swimming in data. And, the already daunting task of managing and analyzing this information will only become more difficult as scientific instruments — especially those capable of delivering more than a petabyte (that’s a quadrillion bytes) of information per day — come online. Tackling these extreme data challenges will require a system that is easy enough for any scientist to use, that can effectively harness the power of ever-more-powerful supercomputers, and that is unified and extendable. This is where the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center’s (NERSC’s) implementation of SciDB comes in. Read more

Open Source GPU now out

Hoping that MIAOW is not a catastrophe An open saucy general-purpose graphics processor (GPGPU) has been unveiled at the Hot Chips event. The GPGPU is relatively crude and is part of another piece of an emerging open-source hardware platform called MIAOW. Read more Also: Nvidia Linux Video Driver 355.11 Adds Experimental OpenGL Support to EGL