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PC-BSD / FreeBSD 11.0-CURRENT Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

Last week I had plans to run some fresh FreeBSD vs. Linux gaming benchmarks using the FreeBSD's Linux software binary compatibility layer.

For those that don't know, FreeBSD boasts a Linux binary compatibility initiative. Five years ago I did some Linux gaming tests on FreeBSD within FreeBSD: A Faster Platform For Linux Gaming Than Linux?. I wanted to do some modern tests atop the latest FreeBSD/PC-BSD code and the latest NVIDIA driver.

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Linux Foundation, OpenIoT, SCALE 14x, and BSD

Filed under
Linux
BSD
  • Linux Foundation announces 2016 events, adds OpenIoT

    The Linux Foundation announced its 2016 event calendar, and issued a CFP for the Apr. 4-6 Embedded Linux Conference, which features an OpenIoT Summit.

    It’s once again time to check your calendar to see if you can carve out a few days to network with your geeky peers — the Linux Foundation has revealed its extensive lineup of 2016 events. In 2015, LF events attracted “nearly 15,000 developers, maintainers, sysadmins, thought leaders, business executives and other industry professionals from more than 3,100 organizations across 85 countries,” says the nonprofit Linux advocacy organization.

  • BSD at SCALE 14x

    As I may have mentioned during the SCALE 14x coverage, one of the disadvantages of the glorious burden of working for a great event such as SCALE is that I don’t get out of the media room enough. The fact is, I can’t — herding the cats known as the tech media and processing various social media posts around the event keeps me in the room.

OPNsense 16.1 released

Filed under
BSD

Welcome back!

No, we would not say it was easy getting here, but booting into 16.1 for the first time sure is as relieving (and exciting) as it could get for our project growing beyond what we had ever imagined. It has been more than a year since OPNsense first came out. Back then it was FreeBSD 10.0. Not even two months after, 10.1 was introduced along with the opnsense-update utility. Today is the day for FreeBSD 10.2, the latest and greatest release currently available for broader driver support and stability improvements.

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Qt 5.5.1 has landed in FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD

The Qt5 (meta-)port and all its dependent ports have been updated to Qt 5.5.1 in FreeBSD. Special thanks to Yuri Victorovich, who did an independent Qt 5.5.1 port and whose work has been gratefully incorporated into this update. Thanks also to Ralf Nolden for pushing for better upgrade-paths and co-installability.

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BSD: LLVM, DragonFlyBSD, More

Filed under
BSD
  • Skylake x86 Target Finally Added To LLVM

    For whatever reason it didn't come for many months until after Skylake CPUs shipped, but LLVM Git/SVN now has Skylake and its features added to the x86 target list.

    Elena Demikhovsky of Intel landed this weekend the Skylake x86 target in LLVM that exposes all of the various CPU instruction set extensions supported by these latest-generation processors. There is also the Skylake server processor class for those with AVX-512 support.

  • DragonFlyBSD Intel Graphics Driver Caught Up To Linux 4.1

    The DragonFlyBSD Intel DRM graphics driver sure is getting close to catching up against the upstream Intel Linux graphics driver with the mainline kernel.

  • The Imaginary Linux Interview from Hell Part 1 [Ed: garbled mess]

Basis Of The Lumina Desktop Environment by Ken Moore

Filed under
BSD

The Lumina Desktop Environment is a new, BSD-licensed, graphical system environment which is designed primarily for BSD and UNIX-based operating systems. This focus on BSD systems results in a number of distinct differences in from the current collection of Linux-focused desktop environments, only one of which is independence from all the Linux-based system management frameworks.

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group test: BSD Distros

Filed under
BSD

On Test

FreeBSD
OpenBSD
NetBSD
DragonFly BSD
GhostBSD
PC-BSD

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How Three BSD Operating Systems Compare To Ten Linux Distributions

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

Earlier this week I posted the results of a 10-way Linux distribution battle on the same Intel Xeon system and using all of the popular and latest Linux distribution releases. Taking things further, the article today has those results complemented by results on the Xeon system for several BSD operating systems. For seeing how the BSD performance stacks up to Linux, DragonFlyBSD, OpenBSD, and the FreeBSD-based PC-BSD were benchmarked.

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Unscrewed; a Story About OpenBSD

Filed under
BSD

If you’re in the packet delivery business, and you’ve never tired OpenBSD, then you’re really missing out. Pretty much everything you care about as a network guy on production networks is configured via a virtual interface. This includes CARP, IPSEC, and all manner of encapsulation and tunneling protocols. This is awesome because all the tools designed to work on interfaces, like tcpdump, work on these virtual interfaces too. So if I want to get a look at my VPN traffic, I can tcpdump enc0.

Which brings up another great point, with OpenBSD, your packet inspection and general network troubleshooting toolbox is way better. Nmap, Argus, sflow, tcpdump, snort, daemonlogger, and etc.. all the best tools are right there on your router if you want them. No need to use a packet tap, because your router is the packet tap.

OpenBSD has myriad built-in daemons for OSPF, BGP, and every other router protocol, as well as application-layer protocol proxies. OpenBSD is by far the fastest, easiest way to setup an ftp proxy that I know of. It also has a kernel-space packet filter called PF, which is crazy feature-rich and and easy to use. If you can console configure an ASA, or are an iptables user, you’ll pick up PF’s syntax in about 15 minutes. All the normal stuff like NAT, redirection, and forwarding are there. Further, PF can do things like policy routing, where you tag packets based on criteria you choose, and then make routing decisions later based on those tags. PF has packet queuing and prioritization built-in, so you can make some classes of traffic more important than others.

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BSD Is Ready for SCALE 14X

Filed under
BSD

First things first: Were I to give an award for Best Presentation Title for SCALE 14X, it would clearly go to iX Systems’ Community Manager (and all-around BSD documentation queen) Dru Lavigne for “Doc Like an Egyptian” — she wins hands down, without question. Dru speaks at SCALE on Saturday, Jan. 23, at 3 p.m.

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Also: openbsd laptops

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Graphics

Sean Michael Kerner on the Linux Foundation's Projects

  • MirageOS Unikernel Effort Moves Forward
    Linux Foundation backed Xen Project helps to advance the state of the MirageOS unikernel operating system with a new release that now supports the KVM hypervisor. The open-source MirageOS unikernel project reached a major milestone on Feb. 23, with the launch of MirageOS 3.0. The basic idea behind a unikernel is that it is a highly-optimized and purpose-built operating system that can help to enable efficient operation and delivery of applications. The MirageOS 1.0 release debuted back in December 2013 as an effort led by the Linux Foundation's Xen hypervisor virtualization project. With the new MirageOS 3.0 release, the unikernel is now expanding beyond the confines of the Xen hypervisor and now also supports the KVM and Bhyve hypervisors as well.
  • Linux Foundation Forms New Open Network Automation Project
    Today the Linux Foundation consolidated the ECOMP and OPEN-O project to form the new Open Network Automation Project (ONAP). ECOMP perhaps has had the shortest life-span of any Linux Foundation project, lasting barely a month. ECOMP only becamean official Linux Foundation project a few short weeks ago, after being donated by AT&T. The Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) is an effort that AT&T has been building for several years to help enable its network transformation for virtualization. OPEN-O on the other hand was announced a year ago, as the Open Orchestrator effort.

Red Hat on Programming

  • Top 3 machine learning libraries for Python
    You don't have to be a data scientist to be fascinated by the world of machine learning, but a few travel guides might help you navigate the vast universe that also includes big data, artificial intelligence, and deep learning, along with a large dose of statistics and analytics. ("Deep learning" and "machine learning" are often used interchangeably, so for a quick terminology primer that might help you understand the difference, read Nvidia's blog post, What's the Difference Between Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Deep Learning?) In this article, I'll look at three of the most popular machine learning libraries for Python.
  • Which is the best programming language for beginners?
    What is the best language for a budding programmer to get their start with? There are probably as many opinions about which language is best for beginners as there are languages to choose from. And the options change all of the time. When we asked this question two years ago, Python came out on top as the clear winner. But is it still the best choice today?

Games for GNU/Linux