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BSD

OpenBSD 6.0

Filed under
BSD
  • OpenBSD 6.0 Is Out With Better ARM Support, More SMP Fun, Dropped Linux Emulation

    Kicking off September the OpenBSD developers announced the release of OpenBSD 6.0.

    Highlights for OpenBSD 6.0 include Linux-only binary emulation being removed due to being unmaintained and seldom used, updates to all the Open*/Libre packages like LibreSSL and OpenSSH, continued work on SMP improvements, ARMv7 platform improvements, and W^X support being enabled by default for the base system.

  • OpenBSD 6.0

GhostBSD 10.3 "Enoch" Officially Released with ZFS and UEFI Support, More

Filed under
BSD

Today, August 31, 2016, the GhostBSD project was pleased to announce the general availability of the final release of their GhostBSD 10.3 "Enoch" operating system based on the latest FreeBSD technologies.

GhostBSD 10.3 has been in development for the past 12 months, during which the development team released two Alpha builds, a Beta milestone, and a Release Candidate, which pretty much contained all the features contained in the final version.

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Also: GhostBSD 10.3 Finally Rolls Out, Offers MATE & Xfce Atop ZFS

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting

    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages.

    During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.

  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box

Second FreeBSD 11.0 Release Candidate Restores Support for 'nat global' in IPFW

Filed under
BSD

Glen Barber from the FreeBSD project announced the availability of the second RC (Release Candidate) development build of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system.

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The Importance of BSD

Filed under
BSD

The Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) is a Unix operating system developed by the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG) of the University of California, Berkeley.

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Leftovers: BSD/LLVM

Filed under
Development
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

Open Source History: Why Didn't BSD Beat Out GNU and Linux?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

If you use a free and open source operating system, it's almost certainly based on the Linux kernel and GNU software. But these were not the first freely redistributable platforms, nor were they the most professional or widely commercialized. The Berkeley Software Distribution, or BSD, beat GNU/Linux on all of these counts. So why has BSD been consigned to the margins of the open source ecosystem, while GNU/Linux distributions rose to fantastic prominence? Read on for some historical perspective.

Understanding BSD requires delving far back into the history of Unix, the operating system first released by AT&T Bell Labs in 1969. BSD began life as a variant of Unix that programmers at the University of California at Berkeley, initially led by Bill Joy, began developing in the late 1970s.

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BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • DragonFlyBSD Decides To Drop PulseAudio

    DragonFlyBSD developers have decided to remove PulseAudio from their dports packaging system and patch their desktop software to not depend upon this open-source sound server.

    Running PulseAudio on DragonFlyBSD appears to cause problems for users, similar to PulseAudio in its early days on Linux, "the pulseaudio server didn't seem to work and even caused one CPU to spin at 100% usage. Moreover, it seems that firefox, even if built without pulseaudio, would detect if PA was installed and use it over ALSA resulting in no sound and a spinning CPU," according to John Marino who removed PA from DragonFlyBSD.

  • LLVM Clang 3.9 Still On Track For Release Next Week

    LLVM release manager Hans Wennborg tagged LLVM 3.9.0-rc2 on Thursday and it's still looking like LLVM/Clang 3.9 could ship on schedule next week.

    Hans noted in the RC2 announcement, "This is a release candidate in the very real sense that if nothing new comes up, this is be what the final release looks like. There are currently no open release blockers, and no patches in my merge-queue."

Benchmarks: 2 BSDs vs. 7 Linux Distributions

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

The operating systems tested for this comparison included CentOS Linux 7, Clear Linux 9710, DragonFlyBSD 4.6.0, Fedora 24, FreeBSD 11.0-Beta 4, Manjaro 16.06.1, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed, Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS, and a daily snapshot of Ubuntu 16.10. For those wondering about OpenMandriva Lx 3.0, I'll have tests of that Clang-compiled distribution later in the week. This BSD/Linux OS comparison grew out of curiosity sake when first seeking to test how well DragonFlyBSD 4.6 and FreeBSD 11 are performing.

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Hands-on: Lumina Desktop 1.0.0

Filed under
Linux
BSD
HowTos

I saw a release announcement for the first official release (1.0.0) of the Lumina Desktop Environment recently. I am always looking for interesting new developments like this, and the announcement said that Lumina could be easily installed on a variety of Linux distributions, many of which I have installed, so I decided to give it a whirl.

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Mozilla Leftovers

  • Making WebAssembly even faster: Firefox’s new streaming and tiering compiler
    People call WebAssembly a game changer because it makes it possible to run code on the web faster. Some of these speedups are already present, and some are yet to come. One of these speedups is streaming compilation, where the browser compiles the code while the code is still being downloaded. Up until now, this was just a potential future speedup. But with the release of Firefox 58 next week, it becomes a reality. Firefox 58 also includes a new 2-tiered compiler. The new baseline compiler compiles code 10–15 times faster than the optimizing compiler.
  • Firefox Telemetry Use Counters: Over-estimating usage, now fixed
    Firefox Telemetry records the usage of certain web features via a mechanism called Use Counters. Essentially, for every document that Firefox loads, we record a “false” if the document didn’t use a counted feature, and a “true” if the document did use that counted feature.
  • Firefox 58 new contributors
  • Giving and receiving help at Mozilla
    This is going to sound corny, but helping people really is one of my favorite things at Mozilla, even with projects I have mostly moved on from. As someone who primarily works on internal tools, I love hearing about bugs in the software I maintain or questions on how to use it best. Given this, you might think that getting in touch with me via irc or slack is the fastest and best way to get your issue addressed. We certainly have a culture of using these instant-messaging applications at Mozilla for everything and anything. Unfortunately, I have found that being “always on” to respond to everything hasn’t been positive for either my productivity or mental health. My personal situation aside, getting pinged on irc while I’m out of the office often results in stuff getting lost — the person who asked me the question is often gone by the time I return and am able to answer.
  • Friend of Add-ons: Trishul Goe
    Our newest Friend of Add-ons is Trishul Goel! Trishul first became involved with Mozilla five years when he was introduced to the Firefox OS smartphone. As a JavaScript developer with an interest in Mozilla’s mission, he looked for opportunities to get involved and began contributing to SUMO, L10n, and the Firefox OS Marketplace, where he contributed code and developed and reviewed apps. After Firefox OS was discontinued as a commercial product, Trishul became interested in contributing to Mozilla’s add-ons projects. After landing his first code contributions to addons.mozilla.org (AMO), he set about learning how to develop extensions for Firefox using WebExtensions APIs. Soon, he began sharing his knowledge by leading and mentoring workshops for extension developers as part of Mozilla’s “Build Your Own Extension” Activate campaign.

24-Way NVIDIA/AMD GPU Benchmarks With X-Plane 11

With the next update to X-Plane 11 introducing VR support, I have renewed interest in this realistic, cross-platform flight simulator. It's been a few years since we last delivered any benchmarks with X-Plane, but for your viewing please today is an assortment of 24 graphics cards both old and new, low-end to high-end from NVIDIA and AMD in looking at how this flight simulator is running on Ubuntu Linux. Read more

Librem 5 Privacy-Focused Linux Phone Crowdfunding Campaign Ends with $2 Million

Librem 5 was successfully crowdfunded about two weeks ago when it surpassed its goal of $1.5 million, but the campaign continued to run, and now it appears to have gathered half million dollars more, ending with $2 million, which we believe is more than enough to build world's first truly free mobile device. Powered by PureOS, Purism's own GNU/Linux distribution based on the popular Debian GNU/Linux operating system, but focused on offering users a privacy-focused and more secure desktop solution, Librem 5 will be using KDE's Plasma Mobile and GNOME's GNOME Shell user interfaces, along with powerful open source software. Read more

Linux Kernel: Linux 4.14.14, Linux 4.9.77, Linux 4.4.112 and Linux 3.18.92

also: Linux Kernels 4.14.14, 4.9.77, 4.4.112, and 3.18.92 Released with Security Fixes