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BSD

Deweloperzy OpenBSD: Ted Unangst

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Interviews
BSD

A friend introduced me to OpenBSD about 15 years ago. At first I was just fooling around with it, and dual booting as necessary, but once I started using it as a server, I didn’t want the embarrassment of downtime whenever I had to reboot. Then I figured out I could write papers using WordPerfect (via Linux emulation) and stuck with OpenBSD full time.

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Deweloperzy OpenBSD: Landry Breuil

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Interviews
BSD

Landry, 33, living on the countryside in the middle of france, avid motorbiker/road-tripper, working on GIS databases, aerial pictures, storage infrastructure and building geographical web services for the public agencies in my area.

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Leftovers: BSD

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BSD

Arch Linux With The FreeBSD Kernel Seems To Have Somewhat Stalled

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Linux
BSD

Arch BSD / PacBSD is a project based on Arch Linux and using its Pacman package manager but replaces the Linux kernel with the FreeBSD kernel. PacBSD is similar in concept to Debian GNU/kFreeBSD that uses Debian's user-land but with the FreeBSD kernel. Arch BSD was renamed to PacBSD earlier this year to avoid any potential trademark issues.

While PacBSD was active as of a few months ago and there's still Git work happening, there's been nothing major to report now in some time. In fact, the PacBSD ISOs haven't been re-spun in more than one year now. Trying to access the PacBSD mailing lists also appear down. There also doesn't appear to be any package updates since July.

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OpenBSD Interviews

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Interviews
BSD
  • Deweloperzy OpenBSD: Dmitrij D. Czarkoff

    In 2005 I tried OpenBSD for the first time. I still recall how I was impressed by the fact that I only needed ifconfig (as opposed to ifconfig, iwconfig and wpa_supplicant on Linux) to configure my wireless network card.

  • Deweloperzy OpenBSD: Marc Espie

    Funny story actually. It was about 20 years ago, and I didn’t have any Internet access at home. I wanted to play with some Unix on my home Amiga, as I didn’t have root access on the suns at University. Getting anything on my Amiga was complicated, as I had to transfer everything through floppies. Turned out OpenBSD was the only OS with sane and clear instructions. NetBSD gave you so many different choices, I couldn’t figure out which one to follow, and Linux was a jungle of patches.

  • W^X enabled in Firefox port

    After recent discussions of revisiting W^X support in Mozilla Firefox, David Coppa (dcoppa@) has flipped the switch to enable it for OpenBSD users running -current.

Leftovers: BSD

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BSD
  • Deweloperzy OpenBSD: Vadim Zhukov

    I’m a 30 years old programmer/sysadmin with wide range of interests from Moscow, Russia. I’m working in IT industry for about half of my life, and last few years I’m also a freelance teacher at Moscow State University of Information Technologies, Radiotechnics and Electronics (ex. Moscow State Institute of Radio Engineering, Electronics and Automation). I have a daughter (best one in the world, of course), which was born at October, 18 – you may call this a Fate. Smile

  • EuroBSDCon 2014 Videos Online

    No, that's not a typo; the videos for EuroBSDCon 2014 are finally online.

  • Deweloperzy OpenBSD: Ingo Schwarze

    Since 2001, so for almost three quarters of its history by now. Originally, it was pure chance. A coworker who used to run various Linux distributions repeatedly got his boxes rooted. Instead of properly securing them, he proposed to try OpenBSD. I said i didn’t care much which system he used. At that time, i was used to working on many different Unix and Unix-like systems (DEC OSF/1, Ultix, HP-UX, AIX, SuSE Linux, Debian GNU/Linux …) and OpenBSD looked like just another Unix-like system, so why not.

  • Linux Top 3: Robolinux 8.2, Bodhi Linux and OpenBSD 5.8

    Lots of changes debut in the new OpenBSD 5.8 release including some interesting security updates.

  • Microsoft taps open source LLVM compiler for cross-platform .Net

    Consider the LLILC project. Rather than reinvent the wheel, Microsoft's new compiler for its CoreCLR .Net runtime leverages an existing cross-platform compiler framework: LLVM. Now six months into the project, its maintainers -- a foundation comprised largely but not exclusively of folks from Microsoft -- reports "great progress" with LLILC, but also "much still to do."

An OpenBSD History Lesson to Mark the Open Source OS's 20th Birthday

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OSS
BSD

OpenBSD, the open source Unix-like operating system that today mostly lives in Linux's shadow, turns 20 this month. To mark the occasion, here's some historical background on one of the only major "open source" operating systems to have survived without embracing the GNU GPL license.

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Why Samsung's Open-Source Group Likes The LLVM Clang Compiler

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Development
BSD

Samsung is just one of many companies that has grown increasingly fond of the LLVM compiler infrastructure and Clang C/C++ front-end. Clang is in fact the default compiler for native applications on their Tizen platform, but they have a whole list of reasons why they like this compiler.

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Leftovers: BSD

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BSD

FreeNAS 10 Enters Alpha, Brings Lots of New Technologies, Based on FreeBSD 10.2

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Security
BSD

FreeNAS' Jordan Hubbard was proud to announce the other day, October 8, the release and immediate availability for download of the first Alpha build of the upcoming FreeNAS open source Network Attached Storage (NAS) solution.

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ownCloud Desktop Client 2.2.4 Released with Updated Dolphin Plugin, Bug Fixes

ownCloud is still alive and kicking, and they've recently released a new maintenance update of the ownCloud Desktop Client, version 2.2.4, bringing some much-needed improvements and patching various annoying issues. Read more

Early Benchmarks Of The Linux 4.9 DRM-Next Radeon/AMDGPU Drivers

While Linux 4.9 will not officially open for development until next week, the DRM-Next code is ready to roll with all major feature work having been committed by the different open-source Direct Rendering Manager drivers. In this article is some preliminary testing of this DRM-Next code as of 29 September when testing various AMD GPUs with the Radeon and AMDGPU DRM drivers. Linux 4.9 does bring compile-time-offered experimental support for the AMD Southern Islands GCN 1.0 hardware on AMDGPU, but that isn't the focus of this article. A follow-up comparison is being done with GCN 1.0/1.1 experimental support enabled to see the Radeon vs. AMDGPU performance difference on that hardware. For today's testing was a Radeon R7 370 to look at the Radeon DRM performance and for AMDGPU testing was the Radeon R9 285, R9 Fury, and RX 480. Benchmarks were done from the Linux 4.8 Git and Linux DRM-Next kernels as of 29 September. Read more

How to Effectively and Efficiently Edit Configuration Files in Linux

Every Linux administrator has to eventually (and manually) edit a configuration file. Whether you are setting up a web server, configuring a service to connect to a database, tweaking a bash script, or troubleshooting a network connection, you cannot avoid a dive deep into the heart of one or more configuration files. To some, the prospect of manually editing configuration files is akin to a nightmare. Wading through what seems like countless lines of options and comments can put you on the fast track for hair and sanity loss. Which, of course, isn’t true. In fact, most Linux administrators enjoy a good debugging or configuration challenge. Sifting through the minutiae of how a server or software functions is a great way to pass time. But this process doesn’t have to be an exercise in ineffective inefficiency. In fact, tools are available to you that go a very long way to make the editing of config files much, much easier. I’m going to introduce you to a few such tools, to ease some of the burden of your Linux admin duties. I’ll first discuss the command-line tools that are invaluable to the task of making configuration more efficient. Read more

Why Good Linux Sysadmins Use Markdown

The Markdown markup language is perfect for writing system administrator documentation: it is lightweight, versatile, and easy to learn, so you spend your time writing instead of fighting with formatting. The life of a Linux system administrator is complex and varied, and you know that documenting your work is a big time-saver. A documentation web server shared by you and your colleagues is a wonderful productivity tool. Most of us know simple HTML, and can whack up a web page as easily as writing plain text. But using Markdown is better. Read more