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BSD

BSD News: ZFS Talk and OpenBSD running on Raspberry Pi 3

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BSD

A Penguin tries out TrueOS, part II

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Reviews
BSD

In the first part of this article I’ve covered system installation, first login and GNOME/XFCE desktop environments usage and I’ve had a brief look at the init system of TrueOS.
In this second part I’m reviewing TrueOS’ most exclusive and distinctive feature, the updates’ management.

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Kicking Off April With An Eight-Way BSD/Linux Comparison

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

For getting April started, here is a fresh comparison of various BSDs and Linux distributions tested on an Intel Core i7 6800K Broadwell-E box. Tested operating systems included Antergos, Clear Linux, DragonFlyBSD 4.8, FreeBSD 11.0, Scientific Linux 7.3, TrueOS 20160322, Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS, and Ubuntu 17.04 20170330.

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Also: Radeon TONGA Sees Some Gains With AMDGPU DRM-Next 4.12

A Penguin tries out TrueOS, formerly PC-BSD, part I

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Reviews
BSD

TrueOS is a rolling-release, desktop-oriented operating system built upon the FreeBSD-CURRENT branch. Its aim is to add desktop-usability, speed and grace to an elephant. It is more a FreeBSD tuning than a fork of it, anyway.

TrueOS is formerly known as PC-BSD; project changed its name, became rolling and mostly dropped pbi’s in late 2016.

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Benchmarks & Trying Out DragonFlyBSD 4.8

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Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

With DragonFlyBSD 4.8 making its debut yesterday, I was excited to give this updated BSD operating system a try now that it has UEFI support and some performance improvements. Here are some early benchmark results of DragonFlyBSD 4.8 compared to 4.6 and Intel's Clear Linux for some additional reference points.

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DragonFly BSD 4.8 Released with EFI & eMMC Support, Improved Kernel Performance

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BSD

The developers of the DragonFly BSD operating system were proud to announce today, March 27, 2017, the release and immediate availability for download of DragonFly BSD 4.8.

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Also: DragonFlyBSD 4.8 Released With Performance Improvements, EFI Support & More

DragonFly BSD 4.8

Leftovers: BSD

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BSD

BSD: iXsystems and DragonFlyBSD

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BSD
  • iXsystems Sees Record Growth in 2016, Charges Into 2017

    The FreeNAS Mini XL was also added, aimed at bringing enterprise-grade storage technology to the small office and home office user

  • VGA-Switcheroo Ported From Linux To DragonFlyBSD

    The latest DRM/graphics-related porting effort by François Tigeot in the DragonFly space is bringing over the vga_swticheroo module from the Linux kernel.

    François Tigeot continues doing a good job porting Linux DRM drivers over to DragonFlyBSD and getting them close to the state where they are with the mainline Linux Git tree. His latest effort is about getting VGA-Switcheroo working on DragonFly.

BSD and GPL

Filed under
GNU
BSD
  • Call for testing: OpenSSH 7.5p1

    OpenSSH 7.5p1 is almost ready for release, so we would appreciate testing on as many platforms and systems as possible. This is a bugfix release.

  • Updates to the last two posts

    Someone from the FSF’s licencing department posted an official-looking thing saying they don’t believe GitHub’s new ToS to be problematic with copyleft. Well, my lawyer (not my personal one, nor for The MirOS Project, but related to another association, informally) does agree with my reading of the new ToS, and I can point out at least a clause in the GPLv1 (I really don’t have time right now) which says contrary (but does this mean the FSF generally waives the restrictions of the GPL for anything on GitHub?). I’ll eMail GitHub Legal directly and will try to continue getting this fixed (as soon as I have enough time for it) as I’ll otherwise be forced to force GitHub to remove stuff from me (but with someone else as original author) under GPL, such as… tinyirc and e3.

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • DragonFlyBSD On NVMe SSDs: Samsung Good, Intel 600p Not

    DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon has been testing out various NVMe M.2 SSDs under his BSD operating system to see how these latest-generation storage devices perform.

  • LLD Linker Declared Ready For Production On x86_64 ELF Platforms

    LLVM developer Rui Ueyama is encouraging the "dogfeeding" of their linker, LLD, that should now be ready for production use on some platforms/architectures with this week's LLVM 4.0 release.

    Rui Ueyama believes that the LLD linker is ready for production with ELF platforms -- namely as Linux and BSDs -- on at least x86_64 but the AArch64 and MIPS architecture support should be in good shape too.

  • vBSDcon 2017 CFP Open

    Verisign is hosting its 3rd vBSDcon, scheduled for September 8 - 9, 2017, in Reston, VA. A Call For Presentations is currently open and submissions are being accepted at vBSDcon.com. CFP administration is being conducted through EasyChair, which require accounts to upload submissions for consideration. Our call is open through April 30, 2017. So get your submissions in soon!

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME 3.25.3 Released, GTK Development

  • GNOME 3.25.3 Now Available
    GNOME 3.25.3 is now available as the latest stepping stone towards September's release of GNOME 3.26.
  • GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Development Continues, New Milestone Is Out Now
    Matthias Clasen has informed the community via an email announcement that the third milestone of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is now ready for public testing. After a one day delay, GNOME 3.25.3 is now available, and it's the third development release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment that could be used by default in popular GNU/Linux distributions, such as the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) or Fedora 27, both due for release later this year. It brings a bunch of updates and new features to several of its components and apps.
  • Eight years since first release and still no usable theme?
    Well, let me be frank. Ever since gtk-3.0 I've been skeptical of it, especially of the theming aspect. In gtk-2 we had (and still have) many themes ranging from trash to excellent, almost every kind of taste could have been satisfied. Not so in gtk-3. First issue is constant changes to theming API, meaning that despite there being hundreds of themes, only handful of them actually work right :( And among them, I still have yet to find one that would work on my fairly usual 15,6″ laptop screen with 1366×768 px resolution. Basicaly I have two issues.

Microsoft Dirty Tricks and Entryism

Security: Windows Causes Chaos, Routers With Back Doors, Patching of UNIX/Linux

  • Traffic lights in Australia hit by WannaCry ransomware [Ed: Well, who uses Microsoft Windows to manage traffic?!?!]

    Radio station 3aw reports that dozens of pole based traffic calming measures are infected and that this came as a surprise to the local minister and Road Safety Camera Commissioner when radio reporters told him about it.

  • Honda shuts down factory after finding NSA-derived Wcry in its networks
    The WCry ransomware worm has struck again, this time prompting Honda Company to halt production in one of its Japan-based factories after finding infections in a broad swath of its computer networks, according to media reports. The automaker shut down its Sayama plant northwest of Tokyo on Monday after finding that WCry had affected networks across Japan, North America, Europe, China, and other regions, Reuters reported Wednesday. Discovery of the infection came on Sunday, more than five weeks after the onset of the NSA-derived ransomware worm, which struck an estimated 727,000 computers in 90 countries. The mass outbreak was quickly contained through a major stroke of good luck. A security researcher largely acting out of curiosity registered a mysterious domain name contained in the WCry code that acted as a global kill switch that immediately halted the self-replicating attack.
  • GhostHook: CyberArk finds new way to attack Windows 10

    Researchers at CyberArk Labs have discovered a new way of gaining access to the innards of Windows 10 64-bit systems that can bypass existing safeguards, including the kernel patch protection known as PatchGuard that Microsoft developed to improve system security.

  • John McAfee claims 'every router in America has been compromised' by hackers and spies

    Technology pioneer John McAfee believes that every home internet router in America is wide open to cyberattacks by criminal hackers and intelligence agencies. He makes the claim speaking after revelations from WikiLeaks that the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) targets the devices.

  • 'Stack Clash' Smashed Security Fix in Linux
    What's old is new again: an exploit protection mechanism for a known flaw in the Linux kernel has fallen to a new attack targeting an old problem.
  • Continuous defence against open source exploits
    Register for next month's expo for the public sector DevOps community to hear key speakers from the front line of public sector digital transformation and see the latest technologies at first hand. Andrew Martin, DevOps lead in a major government department, has been added to the line-up of speakers to talk about the importance of getting the approach to security right with open source software.
  • IoT goes nuclear: creating a ZigBee chain reaction [iophk: "use 6lowpan instead"]

    If plugging in an infected bulb is too much hassle, the authors also demonstrate how to take over bulbs by war-driving around in a car, or by war-flying a drone.

  • Passengers given a freight as IT glitch knocks out rail ticket machines

    The network of machines are operated by the individual franchises, but share a common infrastructure from German software company Scheidt and Bachmann.

OpenBSD Development News

  • OpenBSD now has Trapsleds to make life harder for ROPers
  • Historical: My first OpenBSD Hackathon

    I was a nobody. With some encouragement, enough liquid courage to override my imposter syndrome, and a few hours of mentoring, I'm now doing big projects. The next time you're sitting at a table with someone new to your field, ask yourself: how can you encourage them? You just might make the world better.

    Thank you Dale. And thank you Theo.

  • Finish the link-kit job
    We've had the linkkit components in the tree for a while, but it has taken nearly 20 rounds between rpe/tb/myself to get the last few bits finished. So that the link kit is cleanly used at reboot, but also fits in with the practices kernel developers follow.