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LLVM 6.0 Release Plans

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  • Initial C17 Language Support Lands In LLVM Clang 6.0 SVN

    Back in October is when GCC began prepping C17 support patches for their compiler as a minor update to the C programming language. LLVM's Clang compiler has now landed its initial support for C17.

    C17 is a minor "bug fix version" over the C11 standard. The C17 specification is still being firmed up and following the initial support appearing in GCC, it's now in Clang.

  • LLVM 6.0 Release Planning, Stable Debut Slated For March

    Hans Wennborg as the continuing LLVM release manager has begun drafting plans for the LLVM 6.0 release process.

    Continuing with their usual half-year release cadence, their goal is to ship LLVM 6.0.0 by early March.

Programming/Development: GCC and LLVM/Clang

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  • GCC Lands Cannonlake, Skylake Costs; LLVM/Clang Gets Intel CET

    In addition to the GCC plugin support on Windows/MinGW, there are more compiler happenings this weekend.

    Hitting mainline GCC since that earlier post about the MinGW plugin support is this commit landing the -march=cannonlake target for these next-gen Intel CPUs. It's among the many GCC 8 features and previously covered the Cannonlake enablement while now it's been merged to mainline.

  • LLVM Picks Up 3DNow! Improvements In 2017

    As a flashback to the past, hitting the LLVM Git/SVN code today were improvements for those still running with processors supporting AMD's 3DNow! extensions.

More Coverage of New Lumina Release

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  • Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Released

    The TrueOS BSD folks working on their Qt5-powered Lumina Desktop Environment have issued a new feature update of their open-source desktop.

  • Lumina Desktop 1.4.0 Released

    Lumina 1.4.0 carries a number of changes, optimisations, and feature improvements.

    Lumina is the default desktop of TrueOS, a BSD-based operating system. The desktop itself is lightweight, modular, built using Qt, and uses Fluxbox for window management.

    Although Lumina is mostly aimed at BSD users it also runs on Linux, including Fedora, Arch and — *mario coin sfx* — Ubuntu.

Distribution Releases

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  • OpenMandriva Is Going To Do Away With 32-bit Support

    Following in the steps of Ubuntu 17.10 dropping 32-bit desktop images and other Linux distributions also lessening their focus on 32-bit support, OpenMandriva has issued its final i586 release.

    OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 was released on Tuesday with boot speed improvements, updates to Linux/systemd/Mesa, KDE Plasma 5.10.5, LLVM Clang 5.0, and other package upgrades. This is also going to be their last planned release in the OpenMandriva Lx 3 series.

  • OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 - Get it while it’s hot!

    This release Lx 3.03 is an enhancement and upgrade to the previous Lx 3 releases.

  • LXLE 16.04.3 "Eclectica" Linux Distro Is Out Now Based on Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS

    The developers of the Ubuntu-based LXLE GNU/Linux distribution have announced the release of LXLE 16.04.3, the latest update to the Eclectica series based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

    Incorporating all the updates and core components of Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS, the LXLE 16.04.3 release is here to further integrate various of the components of the MATE and LXQt desktop environments, as well as some from the Linux Mint operating system.

    On top of that, the application menu received improvements to its layout and how items are organization, the system theme was tweaked for consistency, LXhotkey replaces the Obkey Openbox key editor, and Pithos has been removed because it required a user account.

  • pfSense 2.4.2 Open-Source Firewall Patches OpenSSL, Improves Network Performance

    Netgate's Jim Pingle announced the availability of the second maintenance and stabilization update to the latest 2.4 series of pfSense, world's most trusted open-source firewall.

    pfSense 2.4.2 is a security and bugfix release that updates the OpenSSL packages to version 1.0.2m to fix two recently disclosed vulnerabilities (CVE-2017-3736 and CVE-2017-3735), addresses three potential XSS vectors, fixes the VLAN priority handling, and addresses issues with PPP interfaces that have VLAN parents.

pfSense 2.4.2-RELEASE now available

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We are excited to announce the release of pfSense® software version 2.4.2, now available for new installations and upgrades!

pfSense software version 2.4.2 is a maintenance release bringing security patches and stability fixes for issues present in previous pfSense 2.4.x branch releases.

pfSense 2.4.2-RELEASE updates and installation images are available now!

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GhostBSD 11.1 OS Arrives with Own Software Repository, Drops 32-Bit Support

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More than a year in development, GhostBSD 11.1 is based on FreeBSD 11.1 and comes with Xfce and MATE flavors both available for 64-bit (amd64) systems as 32-bit (i386) support is being dropped starting with this release. This is also the first release of the BSD-based OS to ship with its own software package repository.

"After a year of development, testing, debugging and working on our software package repository, we are pleased to announce the release of GhostBSD 11.1 is now available," reads today's announcement. "With 11.1 we drop 32-bit i386 supports, and we currently maintain our software packages repository for more stability."

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Also: GhostBSD 11.1 Released: FreeBSD With MATE & Xfce Desktop Experience

pfSense: Not Linux, Not Bad

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Through the years, I've used all sorts of router and firewall solutions at home and at work. For home networks, I usually recommend something like DD-WRT, OpenWRT or Tomato on an off-the-shelf router. For business, my recommendations typically are something like a Ubiquiti router or a router/firewall solution like Untangled or ClearOS. A few years ago, however, a coworker suggested I try pfSense instead of a Linux-based solution. I was hesitant, but I have to admit, pfSense with its BSD core is a rock-solid performer that I've used over and over at multiple sites.

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GhostBSD 11.1 RC1 is ready!

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This last development release of GhostBSD 11.1 release is ready for testing. All MATE and XFCE images are available only has 64 -bit architectures. For some of you, it might be chock that we are dropping i386 it is a decision that was hard to make. We hope for those that need i386 will find refuge to another BSD project.

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Also: [OpenBSD] Our 2017 Fundraising Campaign

DragonFlyBSD 5.0.1 Released

Programming: GCC and LLVM Updates, new tint

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  • New Qualcomm Saphira Server CPU Added To GCC

    Details are very scarce on the new Qualcomm "Saphira" processor, but initial support for it was added this week to the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC).

    Qualcomm Saphira isn't turning up much in search engines besides some trademark applications and the likes, but this new CPU is seeing quick support in GCC, perhaps due to GCC 8 feature development ending soon.

  • 5.0.1-rc1 has been tagged

    5.0.1-rc1 has been tagged, testers can begin testing and uploading binaries. If you run into any issues, please file bugs at There are still 2 weeks left until the 5.0.1 merge deadline, so there is still time to get fixes in.

  • LLVM 5.0.1 Is Coming In The Next Few Weeks

    Tom Stellard of Red Hat will once again be taking up duties as point release manager for LLVM.

    Tom has now tagged a 5.0.1-rc1 release for testers to begin trying out this first bug-fix update to LLVM 5.0, which itself was released in early September.

  • tint 0.0.4: Small enhancements

    A maintenance release of the tint package arrived on CRAN earlier today. Its name expands from tint is not tufte as the package offers a fresher take on the Tufte-style for html and pdf presentations.

Microsoft, Mozilla and BSD

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  • Microsoft rep switches to Chrome mid-presentation because Edge kept crashing
  • 10 Fascinating Things We Learned When We Asked The World ‘How Connected Are You?’

    We inquired about people’s relationships with their connected devices, like smart TVs, Fitbits, and routers. Questions ranged from “What connected devices do you own?“ to “What is your biggest fear as we move toward a more connected future?”

    Nearly 190,000 people around the world responded. People from the tiny islands of Tuvalu to the huge landmass of China and everywhere in between. (Mozilla released the survey in six languages: English, Spanish, German, Italian, French, and Portuguese.)

    What we learned is fascinating. Like: People in India are more likely to own a smart appliance, whereas people in Argentina are more likely to own a smart TV. And: People everywhere are worried that a more connected future will jeopardize their privacy.

  • $275K for Creative Gigabit Projects Across the U.S.

    Mozilla is partnering with museums, universities, nonprofits, libraries, and high schools in Texas, Louisiana, Kansas, and beyond.

    “We’re focusing on projects that leverage gigabit internet speeds — up to 250x average speeds — to make a positive impact in the communities we serve and across the country,” says Lindsey Frost, who directs Mozilla’s gigabit work. “Projects use augmented reality to train first responders; raise awareness about coastal erosion through virtual reality simulations; bring robotics into high school classrooms; and much more.”

    Through the Mozilla Gigabit Community Fund — a partnership with the National Science Foundation and U.S. Ignite — Mozilla invests in projects that leverage lightning-fast gigabit internet connectivity to further education and workforce development.

  • pfSense 2.3.5 Security Update Addresses WPA2 KRACK Issue, Improves WebGUI

    If you haven't upgraded your pfSense BSD-based firewall to the major 2.4.x stable series yet, we have some good news for you today as the pfSense 2.3.5 security update is now available to download.

    pfSense 2.3.5 is a maintenance and bugfix release for the pfSense 2.3 stable series of the world's most trusted open source firewall, and it's here to patch a few critical security vulnerabilities, including that nasty WPA2 KRACK (Key Reinstallation Attack) issue.

  • OpenZFS RAID-Z Online Expansion Project Announcement


    The FreeBSD Foundation is pleased to announce a collaborative project with Delphix to implement one of the most requested ZFS features, to allow RAID-Z pools to be expanded one disk at a time. We’ve combined our resources with iXsystems and Delphix to bring this project to fruition. The RAID-Z Expansion project will allow OpenZFS users to incrementally add storage to their RAID pools, one device at a time. The expansion will happen online, in the background, with zero downtime, and while maintaining the redundancy and reliability of RAID-Z.

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More in Tux Machines

lkml: remove eight obsolete architectures

In the end, it seems that while the eight architectures are extremely different, they all suffered the same fate: There was one company in charge of an SoC line, a CPU microarchitecture and a software ecosystem, which was more costly than licensing newer off-the-shelf CPU cores from a third party (typically ARM, MIPS, or RISC-V). It seems that all the SoC product lines are still around, but have not used the custom CPU architectures for several years at this point. Read more

If you hitch a ride with a scorpion… (Coverity)

I haven’t seen a blog post or notice about this, but according to the Twitters, Coverity has stopped supporting online scanning for open source projects. Is anybody shocked by this? Anybody? [...] Not sure what the story is with Coverity, but it probably has something to do with 1) they haven’t been able to monetize the service the way they hoped, or 2) they’ve been able to monetize the service and don’t fancy spending the money anymore or 3) they’ve pivoted entirely and just aren’t doing the scanning thing. Not sure which, don’t really care — the end result is the same. Open source projects that have come to depend on this now have to scramble to replace the service. [...] I’m not going to go all RMS, but the only way to prevent this is to have open tools and services. And pay for them. Read more

Easily Fund Open Source Projects With These Platforms

Financial support is one of the many ways to help Linux and Open Source community. This is why you see “Donate” option on the websites of most open source projects. While the big corporations have the necessary funding and resources, most open source projects are developed by individuals in their spare time. However, it does require one’s efforts, time and probably includes some overhead costs too. Monetary supports surely help drive the project development. If you would like to support open source projects financially, let me show you some platforms dedicated to open source and/or Linux. Read more

KDE: Kdenlive, Kubuntu, Elisa, KDE Connect

  • Kdenlive Café #27 and #28 – You can’t miss it
    Timeline refactoring, new Pro features, packages for fast and easy install, Windows version and a bunch of other activities are happening in the Kdenlive world NOW!
  • Kubuntu 17.10 Guide for Newbie Part 9
    This is the 9th article, the final part of the series. This ninth article gives you more documentations to help yourself in using Kubuntu 17.10. The resources are online links to certain manuals and ebooks specialized for Kubuntu basics, command lines usage, software installation instructions, how to operate LibreOffice and KDE Plasma.
  • KDE's Elisa Music Player Preparing For Its v0.1 Released
    We have been tracking the development of Elisa, one of several KDE music players, since development started about one year ago. Following the recent alpha releases, the KDE Elisa 0.1 stable release is on the way. Elisa developers are preparing the Elisa v0.1 release and they plan to have it out around the middle of April.
  • KDE Connect Keeps Getting Better For Interacting With Your Desktop From Android
    KDE Connect is the exciting project that allows you to leverage your KDE desktop from Android tablets/smartphones for features like sending/receiving SMS messages from your desktop, toggling music, sharing files, and much more. KDE Connect does continue getting even better.
  • First blog & KDE Connect media control improvements
    I've started working on KDE Connect last November. My first big features were released yesterday in KDE Connect 1.8 for Android, so cause for celebration and a blog post! My first big feature is media notifications. KDE Connect has, since it's inception, allowed you to remotely control your music and video's. Now you can also do this with a notification, like all Android music apps do! So next time a bad song comes up, you don't need to switch to the KDE Connect app. Just click next on the notification without closing you current app. And just in case you don't like notifications popping up, there's an option to disable it.