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Video: FreeBSD - The Next 10 Years

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Movies
BSD

Jordan Hubbard... should need no introduction but if you don't know who he is, look him up... anyway, Mr. Hubbard spoke recently at the MeetBSD 2014 conference giving a presentation entitled, "FreeBSD: The next 10 years".

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Nzega’s Digital Library Becomes a Reality

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BSD

We installed the FreeBSD operating system on each of the workstations. FreeBSD is an open source derivative of Unix that is renowned for its speed, customizability and rock-solid stability. We also installed a variety of open source software packages from a repository that we created on the Mini. The second Mini serves as a backup and content mirror, which we aim to sync once per year with new material and as needed.

For both teachers it was their very first exposure to FreeBSD. They enjoyed the control and customizability of the installation process, as well as the wide availability of open source software packages in the repository (more than 20,000).

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64-bit ARM FreeBSD Support Is Taking Shape

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BSD

While Linux/Android on AArch64 is what's usually talked about, FreeBSD developers continue making progress on porting their kernel to 64-bit ARM.

For months FreeBSD developers have been eying 64-bit ARM and the kernel code is taking shape. In a status update posted on Monday, FreeBSD/ARM64 is now booting up into single-user mode on ARM's reference simulator. Work is still underway on porting the remaining kernel drivers and getting the 64-bit ARM userland support in shape.

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DragonFlyBSD 4.0 Drops i386 Support, Improves Graphics

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BSD

The much anticipated release of DragonFlyBSD 4.0 is now available.

The biggest "big ticket item" of DragonFlyBSD 4.0 include improving graphics support with the Linux-ported Intel DRM driver now handling Intel "Haswell" graphics complete with OpenGL support, well more than one year after it's been optimized for Linux users. DragonFlyBSD 4.0 is also significant in that it drops 32-bit i386 support in making it 64-bit only for x86 systems. While the DRM driver porting takes a while across all BSD distributions right now, at least DragonFlyBSD developers can take a stand for pushing forward and focusing on 64-bit support rather than 32-bit.

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PC-BSD 10.1 review

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Reviews
BSD

The last PC-BSD release I reviewed was the 9.1 edition, and that was back in December 2012 (see PC-BSD 9.1 preview). That’s almost two years ago, But that’s because I’ve been very disappointed with subsequent releases after that, so I never bothered to write another review, though I was each testing each release privately.

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Linux Vs Unix: The Crucial Differences That Matter To Linux Professionals

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GNU
Linux
BSD

Lately, we hear a lot about Linux — how it’s dominating on servers, how it makes up a large chunk of the smartphone market, and how it’s becoming a highly viable option on the desktop. But Linux didn’t appear out of thin air; before the creation of Linux, and before the rise of Windows, the computing world was dominated by Unix. And for those who don’t know, Linux is very similar to Unix. Since we’ve already looked at the differences between Linux and Windows, what exactly is the difference between Linux and Unix?

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FreeBSD Foundation Receives $1 Million from WhatsApp CEO

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BSD

The FreeBSD project has received a massive $1 million (€800,000) donation from one of the WhatsApp co-founders, Jan Koum, and the developers are more than thrilled at the fact that they have secured their future, at least for a while.

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PC-BSD 10.1-RELEASE Now Available

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BSD

The PC-BSD team is pleased to announce the availability of PC-BSD 10.1 release!

A very special thank you goes out to all the contributors for this release, your help and feedback was greatly appreciated!

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DragonFlyBSD 4.0 RC3 Is Out, Faster DRM Drivers Coming

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BSD

The third release candidate is out for the upcoming DragonFlyBSD 4.0 operating system release.

DragonFlyBSD 4.0 has been in an RC state since last month and uploaded last night was now the third release candidate that brings more updates to the popular BSD derivative.

DragonFlyBSD 4.0 RC2 was released just earlier this week to add procctl() support. The RC3 release has just a few changes around the procctl() system call, a segmentation fault fix, and updating time zone data.

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FreeBSD 10.1 Release Now Available

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BSD

After being set back by only some minor delays, FreeBSD 10.1 stable is now available in released form.

FreeBSD 10.1 brings many new features covered in multiple Phoronix articles but if you're not up to speed on the new release, there's also the 10.1R release notes and the official announcement. Some of our favorite features include the new VT console driver, Bhyve ZFS boot support, UEFI for FreeBSD 64-bit, AutoFS added, and many other package updates and new additions.

Download FreeBSD 10.1-RELEASE from FreeBSD.org.

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World’s smallest i.MX6 module has onboard WiFi, eMMC

Variscite unveiled a 50 x 20mm “DART-MX6″ module that runs Linux or Android on the Freescale i.MX6, with up to 64GB eMMC flash and -40 to 85°C support. Variscite’s claim that the 50 x 20mm DART-MX6 is the world’s smallest computer-on-module based on Freescale’s i.MX6 system-on-chip appears to be a valid one. It beats the smallest ones we’ve seen to date: TechNexion’s 40 x 36mm PICO-IMX6, and Solid-Run’s 47 x 30mm microSOM i4. It’s also just a hair larger than Variscite’s own 52 x 17mm DART-4460, which is based on a dual-core TI OMAP4460 SoC, and Gumstix’s slightly larger 58 x 17mm Overo modules, which use TI Sitara AM37xx SoCs. Read more

BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review

The BQ Aquaris e4.5 Ubuntu Edition is not the debut Canonical must have envisaged for Ubuntu Phone, in the early days of the platform’s development. It’s a perfectly functional smartphone for the most part, and we like the concept of scopes, but the hardware is humdrum, performance is sluggish, and the software running on it is rough and ready, and full of holes. We’ll be tracking the progress of Ubuntu Phone with interest – it surely must get better than this – but this first device is one to write off to experience. Read more