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GhostBSD 11.0 PREALPHA4 is ready for testing

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BSD

This PREALPHA4 release is ready for testing new feature and debugging of GhostBSD 11.0, MATE and XFCE are available with i386 and amd64 architectures.

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Leftovers: BSD

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BSD
  • BSD Mag: Understanding Unikernels by Russell Pavlicek

    The number of tasks which lend themselves to being unikernels is larger than you might think. In 2015, Martin Lucina announced the successful creation of a “RAMP” stack. A variant of the common “LAMP” stack (Linux. Apache, MySQL, PHP/Python), the “RAMP” stack employs NGINX, MySQL, and PHP each built on Rumprun. Rumprun is an instance of a Rump kernel, which is a unikernel system based on the modular operating system functions found in the NetBSD project. So even this very common solution stack can be successfully converted into unikernels.

  • Summary of the preliminary LLDB support project

    Operating systems can be called monitors as they handle system calls from userland processes. A similar task is performed by debuggers as they implement monitors for traced applications and interpret various events that occurred in tracees and are messaged usually with signals to their tracers. During this month I have started a new Process Plugin within LLDB to incept NativeProcessNetBSD - copied from NativeProcessLinux - implementing basic functionality and handling all the needed events in the MonitorCallback() function. To achieve these tasks, I had to add a bunch of new ptrace(2) interfaces in the kernel to cover all that is required by LLDB monitors. The current Process Plugin for NetBSD is capable to start a process, catch all the needed events correctly and if applicable resume or step the process.

  • NetBSD Making Progress On LLDB Debugger Support

    NetBSD developers have been implementing the relevant interfaces needed for the LLVM debugger to effectively monitor and work on the operating system. As part of that they have also improved some of their own documentation, provided new ptrace interfaces, and more.

    Those interested in LLDB and/or NetBSD can learn more about this debugging work via this NetBSD.org blog post.

BSD Leftovers

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BSD

LLVM News

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Development
BSD

  • LLVM Founder, Swift Creator Chris Lattner Is Leaving Apple

    Chris Lattner who is known most recently for starting the Swift programming language while most profoundly he is the original creator of LLVM/Clang, is leaving his job at Apple.

    Lattner had been the director of the Developer Tools department, including Xcode and similar compiler efforts around Swift/LLVM. Chris joined Apple in 2005 due to his work on LLVM/Clang. His wife is the president of the LLVM Foundation. Coming as a surprise today is that he's leaving Apple and no longer the Swift Project Lead, per this mailing list post.

  • LLVM/Clang Finally Lands Mainline Support For AMD's Zen/Ryzen Processors

    The latest LLVM and Clang compiler code as of this morning now has support for Zen (AMD Ryzen) processors.

    Back in 2015 there was the AMD Zen "znver1" patches for GCC along with Zen for Binutils while with the latest Git/SVN development code for LLVM/Clang today is similar "znver1" support.

NetBSD 7.1_RC1 available

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BSD

The first release candidate of NetBSD 7.1 is now available for download at:

http://cdn.NetBSD.org/pub/NetBSD/NetBSD-7.1_RC1/

Those of you who prefer to build from source can continue to follow the netbsd-7 branch or use the netbsd-7-1-RC1 tag.

There have been quite a lot of changes since 7.0. See src/doc/CHANGES-7.1 for the full list.

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Also: NetBSD 7.1 RC1 Released

NetBSD 7.1 RC1

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BSD
  • NetBSD 7.1_RC1 available

    Those of you who prefer to build from source can continue to follow the netbsd-7 branch or use the netbsd-7-1-RC1 tag.

  • NetBSD 7.1 RC1 Released

    The first release candidate of the upcoming NetBSD 7.1 is now available for testing.

Lumina Version 1.2.0 Released

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GNU
Linux
BSD

  • Version 1.2.0 Released

    Happy New Year! 2016 was a really big year for Lumina with the release of version 1.0.0, TrueOS adopting Lumina as it’s only supported desktop environment, the newfound availability of Lumina in many Linux distributions, and so much more. By the same token, 2017 is already shaping up to be another big year for Lumina with things like the new window manager on the horizon. So let’s start this year on the right foot with another release!

  • Lumina 1.2 Desktop Lets You Transform It into an Xfce, MATE, OSX or Windows UI

    Ken Moore, the creator of the TrueOS BSD-based distribution that was formerly known as PC-BSD, kicks off 2017 with a new stable release of his lightweight Lumina desktop environment.

    Primarily an enhancement release, Lumina 1.2.0 desktop environment is here a little over two months after the release of version 1.1.0, and promises to bring a whole lot of goodies, including new plugins, a brand-new utility, as well as various under-the-hood improvements that users might find useful if they use Lumina on their OS.

  • Lumina 1.2 Desktop Environment Released

    A new release of Lumina is now available to ring in 2017, the BSD-first Qt-powered open-source desktop environment.

    With today's Lumina 1.2 desktop environment, the libLuminaUtils.so library is no longer used/needed, the internal Lumina Theme engine has been separated from all utilities, there are new panel and menu plug-ins and a new Lumina Archiver utility as a Qt5 front to Tar. The new plug-ins are an audio player, JSON menu, and a lock desktop menu plugin for locking the current session.

FreeBSD Funding

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BSD
  • FreeBSD Foundation Announces New Uranium Level Donation

    We are thrilled to announce we have received a $500,000 donation from an anonymous donor. We are incredibly grateful for this donation and want to extend a heartfelt thank you to this donor for recognizing the value we provide by supporting the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide. We are indebted to to donors like this, who are investing in FreeBSD and the Foundation to make FreeBSD the best platform for education, research, computing, product development, and gaining real-world skills. Thank you to everyone who has supported us this year!

  • FreeBSD Foundation Receives Another $500,000 USD Gift

    FreeBSD is ending 2016 on a high note by receiving another "Uranium Level" donation, marking it as an additional $500,000 USD for their foundation.

    Earlier this month the FreeBSD Foundation received a $500,000 donation from the founder of WhatsApp, Jan Koum. That's on top of Koum giving one million dollars to FreeBSD back in 2014.

LLVM 3.9.1 Released

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Development
BSD
  • LLVM 3.9.1 Released

    For those nervous about using LLVM Git/SVN of the current 4.0 development code but looking to have the latest fixes atop the stable LLVM 3.9 series, the LLVM 3.9.1 point release is now available.

  • LLVM 3.9.1 Release

    LLVM 3.9.1 is now available! Download it now, or read the release notes.

FreeBSD-Based OPNsense 17.1 Operating System for Firewalls & Routers Enters Beta

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BSD

The OPNsense project had the great pleasure of announcing the release of the first Beta images of the upcoming OPNsense 17.1 operating system developed for firewalls and routers.

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GNOME News: Black Lab Drops GNOME and Further GNOME Experiments in Meson

  • Ubuntu-Based Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 Drops GNOME 3 for MATE Desktop
    Coming about two weeks after the release of Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11, which is based on the Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system using the HWE (hardware enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 appears to be an unexpected maintenance update addressing a few important issues reported by users lately.
  • 3.26 Developments
    My approach to development can often differ from my peers. I prefer to spend the early phase of a cycle doing lots of prototypes of various features we plan to implement. That allows me to have the confidence necessary to know early in the cycle what I can finish and where to ask for help.
  • Further experiments in Meson
    Meson is definitely getting more traction in GNOME (and other projects), with many components adding support for it in parallel to autotools, or outright switching to it. There are still bugs, here and there, and we definitely need to improve build environments — like Continuous — to support Meson out of the box, but all in all I’m really happy about not having to deal with autotools any more, as well as being able to build the G* stack much more quickly when doing continuous integration.