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BSD

BSD: An Open Letter to BSD-powered Companies and Projects, LLVM 6.0 Release Candidate 3 Released

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BSD
  • An Open Letter to BSD-powered Companies and Projects

    For three years, the Tor BSD Diversity Project (TDP) has worked to bring the BSDs into the mainstream of the privacy-enhancing technology ecosystem (PETs).

    We aim to expand the use of the BSDs as a platform for Tor relays, public nodes in the Tor anonymity network. Tor is a critical tool for maintaining privacy online, frequently employed by journalists, human rights workers and those residing in repressive and censored environments.

    [...]

    iIf your entity isn’t ready to run a Tor node, but you’re interested in donating resources such as bandwidth, hardware or some type of monetary support, contact us. TDP looks forward to assisting your staff in configuring and maintaining BSD relays.

  • [llvm-dev] [6.0.0 Release] Release Candidate 3 source, docs and binaries available
  • LLVM 6.0 Release Candidate 3 Arrives As The Official Release Nears

    The third release candidate is available today of LLVM 6.0 and its associated components like Clang, Compiler-RT, libc++, LLDB, etc.

    Hans Wennborg just announced the 6.0.0 RC3 milestone that is now available for download.

Spectre and Meltdown Mitigations Now Available for FreeBSD and OpenBSD Systems

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Security
BSD

More than a month since their public discloser the nasty Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerability have now been fixed for various BSD operating systems including FreeBSD and OpenBSD.

FreeBSD announced last month that it was made aware of the Spectre and Meltdown security vulnerabilities discovered by various researchers from Google's Project Zero, Graz University of Technology, Cyberus Technology, and others in late December 2017 to have time to fix them for their BSD-powered operating system.

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Also: Pledge: OpenBSD’s defensive approach to OS Security

OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability

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Security
BSD
  • OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability

    A few days back FreeBSD 11 stable was mitigated for Meltdown (and Spectre vulnerabilities), which came more than one month after these nasty CPU vulnerabilities were disclosed while DragonFlyBSD was quickly mitigated and the first of the BSDs to do so. While OpenBSD is known for its security features and focus, only today did it land its initial Meltdown mitigation.

  • Meltdown fix committed by guenther@

    Meltdown mitigation is coming to OpenBSD. Philip Guenther (guenther@) has just committed a diff that implements a new mitigation technique to OpenBSD: Separation of page tables for kernel and userland. This fixes the Meltdown problems that affect most CPUs from Intel. Both Philip and Mike Larkin (mlarkin@) spent a lot of time implementing this solution, talking to various people from other projects on best approaches.

    In the commit message, Philip briefly describes the implementation [...]

Linux KPI-Based DRM Modules Now Working On FreeBSD 11

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Linux
BSD

Thanks to work done by Hans Petter Selasky and others, this drm-next-kmod port is working on FreeBSD 11 stable. What's different with this package from the ports collection versus the ported-from-Linux Direct Rendering Modules found within the FreeBSD 11 kernel is that these DRM modules are using the linuxkpi interface.

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FreeBSD Finally Gets Mitigated For Spectre & Meltdown (and Hugs)

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BSD
  • FreeBSD Finally Gets Mitigated For Spectre & Meltdown

    Landing in FreeBSD today was the mitigation work for the Meltdown and Spectre CPU vulnerabilities.

    It's taken a few more weeks longer than most of the Linux distributions to be re-worked for Spectre/Meltdown mitigation as well as DragonFlyBSD, but with FreeBSD Revision 329462 it appears their initial fixes are in place.

    There is Meltdown mitigation for Intel CPUs via a KPTI implementation similar to Linux, the Kernel Page Table Isolation. There is also a PCID (Process Context Identifier) optimization for Intel Westmere CPUs and newer, just as was also done on Linux.

  • FreeBSD outlaws virtual hugs
  • AsiaBSDCon 2018 Conference Programme

Linux, Linux Foundation, Graphics, and BSD

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Linux
BSD

OPNsense 18.1

Filed under
Security
BSD
  • OPNsense 18.1 released

    For more than 3 years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, HardenedBSD security, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

    We humbly present to you the sum of another major iteration of the OPNsense firewall. Over the second half of 2017 well over 500 changes have made it into this release, nicknamed "Groovy Gecko". Most notably, the firewall NAT rules have been reworked to be more flexible and usable via plugins, which is going to pave the way for subsequent API works on the core firewall functionality. For more details please find the attached list of changes below.

  • OPNsense 18.1 BSD Firewall/Network OS Released

    After hitting the RC phase a few weeks ago, OPNsense 18.1 has been officially released as the latest version of this pfSense-forked network/router-oriented BSD operating system.

    OPNsense 18.1 is based on FreeBSD 11.1 while pulling in the HardenedBSD security changes. OPNsense 18.1 reworks its firewall NAT rules, PHP 7.1 and jQuery 3 are powering the web interface, there is now OpenVPN multi-remote support for clients, IPv6 shared forwarding support, improvements for intrusion detection alerts, a rewritten firewall live log, reverse DNS support for insight reporting, and a variety of new plugins.

BSD: LLVM/Clang-Based AOCC and OpenBSD Foundation Fundraising Campaign

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BSD
  • AMD AOCC Compiler 1.1 Released For Zen CPUs

    AOCC 1.1 is the second public release of the AMD Optimizing C/C++ Compiler designed for Ryzen/Threadripper/EPYC processors.

    Back in May AMD released AOCC 1.0 as their optimized compiler stack for Ryzen CPUs. AOCC is the replacement to the company's older AMD Open64 compiler designed for older CPUs. With Open64 sadly being a relic now of the past, AOCC is based upon LLVM/Clang.

  • Our 2018 Fundraising Campaign

    The OpenBSD Foundation needs your help to achieve our fundraising goal of $300,000 for 2018.

    Reaching this goal will ensure the continued health of the projects we support, will enable us to help them do more, and will avoid the distraction of financial emergencies that could spell the end of the projects.

Are the BSDs dying? Some security researchers think so

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BSD

Struck by the small number of reported BSD kernel vulnerabilities compared to Linux, von Sprundel sat down last summer and reviewed BSD source code in his spare time. "How come there are only a handful of BSD security kernel bugs advisories released every year?" he wanted to know. Is it because the BSDs are so much more secure? Or is it because no one is looking?

von Sprundel says he easily found around 115 kernel bugs across the three BSDs, including 30 for FreeBSD, 25 for OpenBSD, and 60 for NetBSD. Many of these bugs he called "low-hanging fruit." He promptly reported all the bugs, but six months later, at the time of his talk, many remained unpatched.

"By and large, most security flaws in the Linux kernel don't have a long lifetime. They get found pretty fast," von Sprundel says. "On the BSD side, that isn't always true. I found a bunch of bugs that have been around a very long time." Many of them have been present in code for a decade or more.

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Compilers and CLI: LLVM, GCC and Bash

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Development
GNU
BSD
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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Desktop: Flatpak and Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension

  • Flatpak in detail, part 2
    The first post in this series looked at runtimes and extensions. Here, we’ll look at how flatpak keeps the applications and runtimes on your system organized, with installations, repositories, branches, commits and deployments.
  • Flatpak – a history
    I’ve been working on Flatpak for almost 4 years now, and 1.0 is getting closer. I think it might be interesting at this point to take a retrospective look at the history of Flatpak.
  • Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension Changes Your Desktop Background With Images From Various Online Sources
    Random Wallpaper is an extension for Gnome Shell that can automatically fetch wallpapers from a multitude of online sources and set it as your desktop background. The automatic wallpaper changer comes with built-in support for downloading wallpapers from unsplash.com, desktopper.co, wallhaven.cc, as well as support for basic JSON APIs or files. The JSON support is in fact my favorite feature in Random Wallpaper. That's because thanks to it and the examples available on the Random Wallpaper GitHub Wiki, one can easily add Chromecast Images, NASA Picture of the day, Bing Picture of the day, and Google Earth View (Google Earth photos from a selection of around 1500 curated locations) as image sources.

today's howtos

KDE: QtPad, Celebrating 10 Years with KDE, GSoC 2018

  • QtPad - Modern Customizable Sticky Note App for Linux
    In this article, we'll focus on how to install and use QtPad on Ubuntu 18.04. Qtpad is a unique and highly customizable sticky note application written in Qt5 and Python3 tailored for Unix systems.
  • Celebrating 10 Years with KDE
    Of course I am using KDE software much longer. My first Linux distribution, SuSE 6.2 (the precursor to openSUSE), came with KDE 1.1.1 and was already released 19 years ago. But this post is not celebrating the years I am using KDE software. Exactly ten years ago, dear Albert committed my first contribution to KDE. A simple patch for a problem that looked obvious to fix, but waiting for someone to actually do the work. Not really understanding the consequences, it marks the start of my journey within the amazing KDE community.
  • GSoC 2018 – Coding Period (May 28th to June 18th): First Evaluation and Progress with LVM VG
    I got some problems during the last weeks of Google Summer of Code which made me deal with some challenges. One of these challenges was caused by a HD physical problem. I haven’t made a backup of some work and had to rework again in some parts of my code. As I already knew how to proceed, it was faster than the first time. I had to understand how the device loading process is made in Calamares to load a preview of the new LVM VG during its creation in Partition Page. I need to list it as a new storage device in this page and deal with the revert process. I’ve implemented some basic fixes and tried to improve it.

Open Hardware: Good for Your Brand, Good for Your Bottom Line

Chip makers are starting to catch on to the advantages of open, however. SiFive has released an entirely open RISC-V development board. Its campaign on the Crowd Supply crowd-funding website very quickly raised more than $140,000 USD. The board itself is hailed as a game-changer in the world of hardware. Developments like these will ensure that it won't be long before the hardware equivalent of LEGO's bricks will soon be as open as the designs built using them. Read more