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BSD

OPNsense 17.7 released

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BSD

For more than two and a half years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, HardenedBSD security, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

We are writing to you today to announce the final release of version 17.7 “Free Fox”, which, over the course of the last 6 months, includes highlights such as SafeStack application hardening, the Realtek re(4) driver for better network stability, a Quagga plugin with broad routing protocol support and the Unbound resolver as the new default. Additionally, translations for Czech, Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese and German have been completed for the first time during this development cycle.

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BSD/UNIX: Trying OpenIndiana Hipster On The Core i9 7900X and 'End' of Bitrig

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BSD
  • Trying OpenIndiana Hipster On The Core i9 7900X

    Following the Linux and BSD multi-threaded tests on the Intel Core i9 7900X, I next decided to try this system with the Solaris-based OpenIndiana. Sadly, it didn't end well.

    With various BSDs working fine on the Core i9 7900X box paired with the NVMe storage, MSI X299 SLI PLUS motherboard, etc, I figured OpenIndiana would play fine. Sadly, I was wrong.

  • Bitrig: The Short-Lived OpenBSD Fork

    Bitrig, the operating system that forked OpenBSD back in 2012, is no longer being developed.

    Bitrig saw its initial release in 2014 but it's been relatively quiet since. In fact, pretty much forgotten on my end until seeing an LLVM commit this week mentioning Bitrig is dead and has been merged back into OpenBSD.

    Further showing the project is no more is the GitHub project area showing no more work since 2016.

BSD: TrueOS and OpenBSD mandoc

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BSD
  • Milestone Complete! OpenRC conversion

    The OpenRC conversion project is done! Over one thousand script/port conversions are complete, and all will be available in the TrueOS UNSTABLE and STABLE tracks soon. The project wants to extend a huge thank you to all those who contributed to completing this milestone, and a special thank you to contributors ZackaryWelch and elarge011 for doing the lion’s share of the work.

  • TrueOS Finishes Porting Scripts To OpenRC

    The TrueOS BSD distribution has finished porting over more than one thousand FreeBSD RC scripts into OpenRC format for this dependency-based init system.

    This year the TrueOS crew has been working on migrating to the OpenRC init system for better boot performance, easier configuration, better organization of configuration files, more reliable service status, etc. Popular services had been in OpenRC form already but now they have finished porting over more than 1,000 other scripts for OpenRC on TrueOS.

  • mandoc-1.14.2 released

     

    With the improved mandoc features, only twenty-five out of the ten thousand software packages in the OpenBSD ports tree still need groff to format their manual pages.

FreeBSD 11.1 Released

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BSD
  • FreeBSD 11.1 Operating System Debuts to Support 2nd Generation Microsoft Hyper-V

    The FreeBSD Project announced today the release and immediate availability of the first incremental update to the FreeBSD 11 operating system series, FreeBSD 11.1.

    It's been more than nine months since FreeBSD 11 was released as the latest and most advanced version of the widely-used and most popular BSD operating system on the market, and now, FreeBSD 11.1 is here with a bunch of new features across multiple components, as well as all the latest security and bug fixes.

  • FreeBSD 11.1 Debuts With LLVM/Clang 4, ZFS Improvements

    FreeBSD 11.1 is now available as the first point release to FreeBSD 11.

  • FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE Announcement

    The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE. This is the second release of the stable/11 branch.

BSD and Programming: OpenBSD, Development Style, and GCC/C++

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Development
GNU
BSD
  • OpenBSD kernel address randomized link

    A less than two-month-old project for OpenBSD, kernel address space randomized link (KARL), has turned the kernel into an object that is randomized on every boot. Instead of the code being stored in the same location for every boot of a given kernel, each boot will be unique. Unlike Linux's kernel address space layout randomization (KASLR), which randomizes the base address for all of the kernel code on each boot, KARL individually randomizes the object files that get linked into the binary. That means that a single information leak of a function address from the kernel does not leak information about the location of all other functions.

    Theo de Raadt first posted about the idea on the OpenBSD tech mailing list on May 30. He described the current layout of the OpenBSD kernel code, which is effectively the boot code and assembly runtime (in locore.o), followed by the kernel .o files in a fixed order. His post had some changes that would split out the assembly runtime from locore.o and link it and all of the kernel .o files in a random order. The only piece that would be placed at a known address would be locore.o; it would be followed by a randomly sized gap, then by the kernel text that has its .o files arranged in a random order. There would also be random gaps before other sections (i.e. .rodata, .data, and .bss) that are placed after the kernel text.

  • openbsd changes of note 625
  • moving to https

     

    There is some security benefit, of course, but really it’s all about the speed. I want flak to be as fast as possible, thus we need to be using the fastest protocol.  

  • Stop writing code like we're in the '90s: a practical approach (PART Sleepy

    A lot of criticisms come from users that probably wrote Java code when it was born.

  • GCC Begins Preparing For C++20 With -std=c++2a

pfSense 2.3.4-p1 Open-Source Firewall Update Brings Security Fixes for OpenVPN

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BSD

A new security and bug fix maintenance update just landed today for the pfSense 2.3.4 stable release of the open-source and free firewall distribution based on the FreeBSD technologies.

The pfSense 2.3.4-p1 patch is being released two and a half months after the launch of pfSense 2.3.4, and it looks like it attempts to inject new security fixes in pfSense and several of its components, including OpenVPN, as well as to fix various bugs that have been reported during this time. For example, it fixes Hover Dynamic DNS updates to be able to verify the SSL peer.

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BSD: OpenBSD, Benchmarking LLVM/Clang, and AMD Zen Scheduler Model Lands In LLVM

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BSD
  • Blog about my blog

     

    I want to try it again, and this time I decided to create a self-hosted blog. Something that runs on my own server and with httpd, the web server that I wrote for OpenBSD.  

    [...]

    i That's why I decided to write my articles, including this one, in Markdown and use another tool such as lowdown to generate the XML pages for sblg.

     

  • Benchmarking LLVM/Clang's New AMD Zen Scheduler Model

    Just prior to LLVM 5.0 being branched yesterday, the AMD Zen scheduler model finally landed in LLVM and has the potential of boosting the performance of generated binaries targeting AMD's Zen "znver1" architecture. Here are some benchmarks of LLVM Clang 4.0 compared to the latest LLVM Clang compiler code when testing with both generic x86-64 optimizations and then optimized builds for the first-generation Zen CPUs, tested on a Ryzen 7 processor.

  • AMD Zen Scheduler Model Lands In LLVM, Makes It For LLVM 5.0

    It was coming down to the wire for the new AMD Zen scheduler model in LLVM 5.0 but now it's managed to land just hours before the LLVM 5.0 branching.

    The new Zen "znver1" scheduler model for LLVM was published by AMD in patch form last week and now this morning it's been merged to mainline LLVM. Funny enough, thanks to an Intel developer with commit rights to LLVM due to the AMD contributor not having access.

BSD: OPNsense RC1, TrueNAS X10, LLVM and More

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BSD

Releases of SparkyLinux, Linux RC, and FreeBSD RC

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GNU
Linux
BSD
  • SparkyLinux 5.0 Rolling Released with LXQt, Xfce & MATE ISOs, Based on Debian 10
  • Linus Torvalds Kicks Off Development of Linux Kernel 4.13 with the First RC

    A day early than initially expected, the development of the Linux 4.13 kernel was kicked off by Linus Torvalds himself with the first Release Candidate (RC) in the series.

    The merge window was opened during the past two weeks, since the launch of the Linux 4.12 kernel, which is now stable and ready for deployment, so Linus Torvalds decided to close it a day early to avoid late pull requests and push the first Release Candidate of Linux kernel 4.13 out the door for public testing, which seems to be quite huge, but it's normal for this stage.

  • FreeBSD 11.1 OS Just Around the Corner as Last Scheduled RC Sees Light of Day

    The first point release of the FreeBSD 11 operating system is about to be unleashed very soon as developer Glen Barber just announced the release of the third RC development milestone.

    FreeBSD 11.1 was in development for only a month, during which it received three Beta and three RC builds that users could download and test out on their personal computers to report bugs or any other issues. And now that the third RC is out, it looks like it might also be the last one for this cycle.

BSD Releases: NAS4Free 11.1.0.4.4485 and FreeBSD 11.1-RC3

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BSD
  • NAS4Free 11.1.0.4.4485 Released
  • FreeBSD 11.1-RC3 Available

    The third RC build for the FreeBSD 11.1 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, armv6, i386, aarch64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.

  • FreeBSD 11.1-RC3 Now Available

    The third RC build of the 11.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available. This is expected to be the final RC build of the 11.1-RELEASE cycle.

  • FreeBSD 11.1 RC3 Released As The Final Build Is Near

    FreeBSD 11.1 remains on track for releasing later this month.

    FreeBSD 11.1 RC3 is available this weekend as what should be the final release candidate for this minor update to FreeBSD 11. Changes found in FreeBSD 11.1 RC3 include adding deprecation notices to gdb/kgdb/sicontrol/wlconfig and other drivers that will be removed in FreeBSD 12.0, Capsicum support in the Bhyve virtualization code, and various other fixes and clean-ups.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Mesa and AMDGPU

  • Mesa 17.3.3 Released With RADV & ANV Vulkan Driver Fixes
    Mesa 17.3.3 is now available as the latest point release for the Mesa 17.3 stable series. This bi-weekly point release to Mesa presents several RADV Vega/GFX9 fixes, various Intel ANV Vulkan driver fixes, a DRI3 fix, and random fixes to the OpenGL drivers like RadeonSI, Etnaviv, and even Swrast.
  • R600g "Soft" FP64 Shows Signs Of Life, Enabling Older GPUs To Have OpenGL 4 In 2018
    Most pre-GCN AMD graphics cards are still limited to OpenGL 3.3 support at this time due to not supporting FP64. Only the HD 5800/6900 series on R600g currently have real double-precision floating-point support working right now so at present they are on OpenGL 4.3 rather than 3.3, but those other generations may be catching up soon thanks to the "soft" FP64 code.
  • AMDGPU DC Gets More Raven Ridge Improvements, Audio Fixes
    Harry Wentland of AMD has sent out the latest batch of patches for the AMDGPU DC display code stack. Fortunately it lightens up the DRM driver by about six thousand lines thanks to removing some unused code. Besides gutting out a chunk of unused code, the DC code has a few audio fixes (no word yet on supporting newer audio formats with DC), fixes on driver unload, a "bunch" of continued Raven Ridge display updates, and various other code clean-ups.
  • AMDGPU Firmware Blobs Updated For Video Encode/Decode
    There are updated AMDGPU microcode/firmware files now available for recent Radeon GPUs. The updated firmware files now available via the main linux-firmware.git repository are centered around the video blocks: UVD video decoding, VCE video encode, and the new VCN video encode/decode block with Raven Ridge.

Games: DRAG, Geneshift, Balloonatics and More

Tumbleweed Update

  • Tumbleweed Rolls Forward with New versions of Mesa, Squid, Xen
    This week provided a pretty healthy amount of package updates for openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed. There were three snapshots released since the last blog and some of the top packages highlighted this week are from Mesa, Squid, Xen and OpenSSH. The Mesa update from version 17.2.6 to 17.3.2 in snapshot 20180116 provided multiple fixes in the RADV Vulkan driver and improvements of the GLSL shader cache. The Linux Kernel provides some fixes for the security vulnerabilities of Meltdown in version 4.14.13 and added a prevent buffer overrun on memory hotplug during migration for KVM with s390. The snapshot had many more package updates like openssh 7.6p1, which tightened configuration access rights. A critical fix when updating Flatpak packages live was made with the gnome-software version 3.26.4 update. File systems package btrfsprogs 4.14.1 provided cleanups and some refactoring while wireshark 2.4.4 made some fixes for dissector crashes. Xen 4.10.0_10 added a few patches. Rounding out the snapshot, ModemManager 1.6.12 fixed connection state machine when built against libqmi and blacklisted a few devices to include some Pycom devices.
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Rolls To Mesa 17.3, Linux 4.14.13
    OpenSUSE has continued rolling in the new year with several key package updates in January. Exciting us a lot is that openSUSE Tumbleweed has migrated from Mesa 17.2 to now Mesa 17.3. Mesa 17.3.2 is the version currently in openSUSE's rolling-release.

India Digital Open Summit 2018