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BSD

A BSD Wish List for 2016

Filed under
BSD

First things first: I know that the wide number of variants in the BSD family are primarily aimed at servers. That said, it’s clearly understandable that with the exception of PC-BSD and BSD variants like GhostBSD, desktop/laptop users are not the primary focus in the BSD constellation. I get that, and regardless I am still using it for about 80 percent of my overall computing needs, and still using it on a daily basis on my go-to daily laptop.

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BSD-Based pfSense 2.2.6 Firewall Patches WebGUI and OpenSSL Security Issues

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BSD

Electric Sheep Fencing LLC., through Chris Buechler, has been glad to announce the immediate availability for download of the sixth maintenance release of the stable pfSense 2.2 FreeBSD-based firewall distribution.

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Bash and FreeNAS Logos

Filed under
GNU
BSD
  • Bash logo

    I received a very generous offer to create a new logo and donate it for the project's use. The benefactor is Justin Dorfman, and he has been very patient to wait for me to select from among a number of good alternatives (part of what made it so tough).

  • Linux Predictions 2016, FreeNAS Logo Contest & More…

    FreeNAS Logo Contest: Okay, artists, get those colored pencils sharpened, those brushes cleaned and ready, because you have an assignment — that logo isn’t going to design itself. FreeNAS — “founded in 2005 on the guiding principle that network storage software should be available to the public at no cost and free of license restrictions” according to its site — has initiated a logo contest, urging the community to contribute artwork to become a part of FreeNAS history.

Plotting Out the BSD Year

Filed under
BSD

What’s good to know is that BSD will be well-represented at both of these events. At SCALE 14x — which is the first-of-the-year FOSS event worldwide from Jan. 21-24, 2016, in Pasadena, Calif. — the FreeBSD Foundation (along with FreeBSD in its own booth, of course) will be there, as well as pfSense. What’s more, there’s a BSD certification exam being offered, as it has been for the last several years at SCALE. More on this in a later post.

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Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • Call for papers

    BSDCan is an enormously successful grass-roots style conference. It brings together a great mix of *BSD developers and users for a nice blend of both developer-centric and user-centric presentations, food, and activities.

  • Screenshots from developers: 2002 vs. 2015

    In 2002 I asked a number of developers/Unix people for screenshots of their desktops. I recently republished them, and, seeing the interest this generated, I thought it’d be fun to ask the same people* again 13 years later. To my delight I managed to reach many of them.

  • PC-BSD 11.0-Current Images Ready, and Let’s Read Some Mail

    Parsing the developments from the BSD side of things this week for consumption by the general public is a little trickier than it is across the street on the Linux side, however with a little juggling (and an important note from iXsystems to come tomorrow in the weekly FOSS roundup), we’ll take a look at the new images ready for your testing and feedback. Also, I’ll answer some questions which arose in last week’s comments.

Guarding the gates with OpenBSD 5.8

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

The OpenBSD project has long held a reputation for producing a secure operating system. The project boasts just two remote security holes reported over a span of about twenty years. It's an impressive accomplishment for the developers and a good indication of why OpenBSD is so often trusted for security oriented tasks like running firewalls. However, the OpenBSD team has been steadily working on other projects too. The team behind OpenBSD also creates the widely used OpenSSH software which is used around the world by system administrators to remotely work on servers and securely transfer files. The OpenBSD project also spawned the LibreSSL software (a replacement for OpenSSL) following the Heartbleed vulnerability. In the latest release of OpenBSD we also saw improvements to the project's lightweight and secure web server (called httpd), the introduction of the doas command (a replace for sudo), a new implementation of the file command and W^X support for i386 processors. The latest version of the operating system, OpenBSD 5.8, also switched to denying root logins in the default installation.

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DragonFly BSD 4.4

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BSD

DragonFly version 4.4 bring further updates to accelerated video for both i915 and radeon users, a new locale system, and a new default linker. Significant behind-the-scenes work has also been done, with symbol versioning, Hammer1 improvements, and other changes. Version 4.4.1 was the first release due to the late inclusion of OpenSSL update 1.0.1q.

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BSD for the desktop user: A review of PC-BSD

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Reviews
BSD

To be clear, the BSDs are not Linux distributions. They are Unix-like, so they are similar to Linux, but they are their own family of open source operating systems with their own rich history. Unlike Linux with its multitude of distributions, the BSD family is much smaller; the big three distributions are FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD. The small handful of other BSD distributions branch off from one of those projects, most frequency, from FreeBSD.

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DragonFlyBSD 4.4 Brings Collation Support, Uses Gold Linker By Default

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BSD

DragonFlyBSD 4.4 is ready for release with a number of exciting improvements and new features.

DragonFlyBSD 4.4 delivers improvements to the i915 and Radeon DRM drivers that are now up to parity with their state from Linux 3.18, supports collation for named locales, a overhauled locale system, and the regex library was replaced with the TRE library. Also very prominent to DragonFlyBSD 4.4 is that it uses the Gold linker by default.

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Is That Linux? No, It’s PC-BSD

Filed under
Linux
BSD

Linux was fast enough on this machine. But in street racing parlance, with PC-BSD I’m burning rubber in all four gears.

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Kernel Graphics

Intel Graphics Performance: Clear Linux vs. Xubuntu 16.04 LTS vs. Fedora 23 Xfce

With recent benchmarks showing Intel's Clear Linux distribution even being faster for Intel HD Graphics performance compared to other more common distributions like Ubuntu 16.04, I decided to run some more tests and also test Fedora 23 Xfce into the mix. Read more