Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

BSD

BSD Releases: NAS4Free 11.1.0.4.4485 and FreeBSD 11.1-RC3

Filed under
BSD
  • NAS4Free 11.1.0.4.4485 Released
  • FreeBSD 11.1-RC3 Available

    The third RC build for the FreeBSD 11.1 release cycle is now available. ISO images for the amd64, armv6, i386, aarch64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites.

  • FreeBSD 11.1-RC3 Now Available

    The third RC build of the 11.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available. This is expected to be the final RC build of the 11.1-RELEASE cycle.

  • FreeBSD 11.1 RC3 Released As The Final Build Is Near

    FreeBSD 11.1 remains on track for releasing later this month.

    FreeBSD 11.1 RC3 is available this weekend as what should be the final release candidate for this minor update to FreeBSD 11. Changes found in FreeBSD 11.1 RC3 include adding deprecation notices to gdb/kgdb/sicontrol/wlconfig and other drivers that will be removed in FreeBSD 12.0, Capsicum support in the Bhyve virtualization code, and various other fixes and clean-ups.

KDE Frameworks 5.36.0 and KDE Plasma 5 on FreeBSD

Filed under
KDE
BSD
  • Release of KDE Frameworks 5.36.0
  • KDE Frameworks 5.36 Adds Unicode 10.0 Support, Improves the VLC Tray Icon

    The KDE Project released the monthly update of its KDE Frameworks collection of more than 70 add-on libraries to Qt, which is designed to provide a wide range of commonly needed functionality to KDE application developers.

    KDE Frameworks 5.36.0 is here as the latest build of the application framework, and it looks like it brings lots of changes for most of the supported components, including Plasma Framework, KTextEditor, KAuth, KBookmarks, NetworkManagerQt, Solid, KIconThemes, KI18n, KIO, and KXMLGUI.

    Additionally, the update adds various improvements to the KWidgetsAddons, KPackage Framework, KDeclarative, KCoreAddons, KConfig, KFileMetaData, KNewStuff, Baloo, ThreadWeaver components, as well as to syntax highlighting, KDELibs 4 support, extra CMake modules, and Breeze icons

  • Wayland, and Weston, and FreeBSD – oh my!

    KDE’s CI system for FreeBSD (that is, what upstream runs to continuously test KDE git code on the FreeBSD platform) is missing some bits and failing some tests because of Wayland. Or rather, because FreeBSD now has Wayland, but not Qt5-Wayland, and no Weston either (the reference implementation of a Wayland compositor).

  • KDE Plasma 5 Making Progress On FreeBSD, With Some Wayland/Weston Support

    KDE developer Adriaan de Groot continues making progress on improving the support when running this desktop environment on FreeBSD. Adriaan has even been experimenting with Wayland/Weston on FreeBSD.

    Adriaan has been focusing on improvements for the KDE continuous integration system for FreeBSD and has pushed Weston and the Qt5-Wayland port to the Area51 repository that provides the bleeding-edge KDE packages for FreeBSD users.

FreeBSD 11.1 RC2 Released

Filed under
BSD

FreeBSD developers have announced the second release candidate of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.1.

FreeBSD 11.1 changes since the previous release candidate include VM subsystem fixes, a gpart issue with systems using an SD card as the primary driver, some network fixes, the ena driver has been added, and various other fixes/alterations.

Read more

Also: [REVISED] FreeBSD 11.1-RC2 Now Available

Defending GPL, Bashing GPL

Filed under
GNU
OSS
BSD
Legal
  • Permissive and Copyleft Are Not Antonyms

    Using the term “permissive” as an antonym to “copyleft” – or “restrictive” as its synonym – are unhelpful framing. Describe license reciprocity instead.

    Some open source licenses implement a clever hack invented by Richard Stallman where, as a condition of the copyright license, anyone creating derived versions has to agree they will license the new version the same way as the original. In a play on words, this concept is called “copyleft” and many open source licenses implement this hack.

    In its strongest form, the “copyleft” idea can place a condition on the licensing of all the other code compiled together to make the eventual binary executable program. Complying with this requirement can prevent use of business models that deny software freedom to the end user; as a consequence, many commercial software developers avoid the strongest forms of copyleft licensing.

    There are less stringent forms of copyleft. Licenses like the MPL (Mozilla Public License) only require individual files that are modified to be licensed under the same license as the original and don’t extend that requirement to other files used to build the executable. The Eclipse Public License (EPL) has a copyleft provision that’s triggered by distribution of the source code. These scope-restricted variants are all described as “weak copyleft.”

    In discussing these licensing approaches with clients, I’ve often found that these terms “strong copyleft” and “weak copyleft” lead to misunderstandings. In particular, developers can incorrectly apply the compliance steps applicable to one “weak” license to code under another license, believing that all such licenses are the same. As a consequence, I prefer to use different terms.

  • Should the Fair License Replace the GPL?

    Read the full license, and if you find yourself thinking, “That sounds impossible to enforce,” you aren’t alone. To me, the Fair Source License looks like another one of the many attempts I’ve seen to come up with something that looks like a free or open source license, but really isn’t.

FreeBSD 11.1 Release Candidate 1

Filed under
BSD

The first release candidate for FreeBSD 11.1 is now available for testing.

FreeBSD 11.1 RC1 shipped this morning with build toolchain fixes, NTPD leap-seconds file added, VM subsystem fixes, memory leak fixes, and other changes.

Read more

Also: FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE Release Notes

Lumina 1.3.0 Released

Filed under
BSD

FreeBSD 11.1 BETA3

Filed under
BSD

OpenBSD Development News

Filed under
Development
BSD
  • OpenBSD now has Trapsleds to make life harder for ROPers
  • Historical: My first OpenBSD Hackathon

    I was a nobody. With some encouragement, enough liquid courage to override my imposter syndrome, and a few hours of mentoring, I'm now doing big projects. The next time you're sitting at a table with someone new to your field, ask yourself: how can you encourage them? You just might make the world better.

    Thank you Dale. And thank you Theo.

  • Finish the link-kit job

    We've had the linkkit components in the tree for a while, but it has taken nearly 20 rounds between rpe/tb/myself to get the last few bits finished. So that the link kit is cleanly used at reboot, but also fits in with the practices kernel developers follow.

NetBSD Image for Raspberry Pi Updated to Improve Raspberry Pi 3 Boot Support

Filed under
Linux
BSD

Jun Ebihara of the Japan NetBSD Users' Group is reporting today on Twitter that he managed to release an updated version of the Raspberry Pi image for the NetBSD (evbarm) operating system.

Read more

That's random: OpenBSD adds more kernel security

Filed under
Security
BSD

OpenBSD has a new security feature designed to harden it against kernel-level buffer overruns, the "KARL" (kernel address randomised link).

The changes are described in this note to an OpenBSD developer list penned by founder and lead developer Theo de Raadt.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Android Leftovers

Our Favourite Apps for Ubuntu

We enjoy using Ubuntu mainly for gaming, writing, listening to music and browsing the web. (Lots and lots of browsing the web.) There are other apps that we would love to have on Ubuntu like Affinity Photo, a stunning image editor that’s on par with Adobe’s Photoshop that’s available on Windows and Mac as well as Bear, a beautifully designed note taking app that we do most of our writing on that’s only available for macOS. However, the Ubuntu platform has moved forward in leaps and bounds in recent years when it comes to the official availability of popular apps and we are confident that this trend will continue. What’s your favourite Ubuntu apps? Read more

Kernel Space: Plans for Linux 4.16, 4.15 Likely Out Shortly