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BSD

FreeBSD: 10 Things to Do After Fresh Installation of FreeBSD, Second FreeBSD 10.4-Beta Available

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BSD

Lumina desktop – Show me the light

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Reviews
BSD

The good thing about Qt (as a framework and technology) is that it powers so many interesting products seamlessly, quietly, unassumingly. The bad thing is, sometimes you may use something that has Qt DNA, and yet, you wouldn’t know it unless explicitly told. Such is the case with the Lumina desktop.

This less-known desktop environment powers mostly BSD operating systems, but it does not seem to have caught on in the Linux world that much. At the moment, you are most likely to find it gracing TrueOS, which uses it as its default interface. And yet, with modern architecture under the hood, it could be a suitable alternative to other mainstream desktop environments. Let’s see what gives.

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Swift/BSD/LLVM

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Development
BSD

BSD: LLVM, Clang “Absolute FreeBSD”

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BSD
  • LLVM's Clang C/C++ Compiler Is Still Having Problems With ~5% Of Debian Packages

    Debian developer and LLVM/Clang enthusiast Sylvestre Ledru has provided an update regarding the build results for trying to compile the Debian archive using this GCC compiler alternative.

  • Rebuild of Debian using Clang 3.9, 4.0 and 5.0

    tldr: The percentage of failure is decreasing, Clang support is improving but there is a long way to go.

    The goal of this initiative is to rebuild Debian using Clang as a compiler instead of gcc. I have been doing this analysis for the last 6 years.

    Recently, we rebuilt the archive of the Debian archive with Clang 3.9.1 (July 6th), 4.0.1 (July 6th) and 5.0 rc2 (August 20th).

    For various reasons, we didn't perform a rebuild since June 2016 with version 3.8. Therefor, we took the opportunity to do three over the last month.

  • ARC Backend Merged In LLVM

    LLVM 6.0 SVN/Git now has landed a Synopsys DesignWare ARC processor back-end.

  • AF3e status, 22 August 2017

    Your irregular “Absolute FreeBSD” status report!

    It’s at 123,700 words. 12 of 26 chapters exist as first drafts. (Yes, the last report said 7 of 24. I can’t count.) Two more chapters are partially done. One of those partially-done chapters, on “Pre-Install Considerations,” won’t be done until I finish the whole book. I keep going back to add tidbits to it. It’s complete, except when I find something else I have to add to it.

BSD: DragonFly, LLVM, and Kernel Syspatches

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BSD
  • Next DFly release will have an initial HAMMER2 implementation

    The next DragonFly release (probably in September some time) will have an initial HAMMER2 implementation.  It WILL be considered experimental and won't be an installer option yet.  This initial release will only have single-image support operational plus basic features.  It will have live dedup (for cp's), compression, fast recovery, snapshot, and boot support out of the gate.

  • Next DragonFlyBSD Release Will Offer Experimental HAMMER2

    After the HAMMER2 file-system was announced back in 2012, the next DragonFlyBSD release likely to be released in September will offer experimental support for this next-generation HAMMER file-system.

    A few days back I reported on HAMMER2 looking like it was getting ready for its debut and DragonFlyBSD/HAMMER lead developer Matthew Dillon has now announced it will indeed be an experimental feature in the next release of this BSD operating system.

  • Cortex-A75 and Cortex-A55 Now Supported By LLVM

    ARM's latest big.LITTLE cores are now supported by LLVM, the Cortex A75 and A55.

  • RISC-V Support Continues Advancing For LLVM

    For those interested in the RISC-V open-source, royalty-free RISC-V instruction set architecture, the LLVM compiler support for it continues advancing.

    Alex Bradbury gas written a status update concerning the RISC-V LLVM support. At the moment the code remains out-of-tree for all the active development work. With that code, most of the GCC torture suite can compile for RV32I.

  • Kernel syspatches will soon be smaller thanks to KARL

     

    [...] the groundwork is done for having syspatch update only the kernel object files that have changed.

BSD: BSDCAN, t2k17 Hackathon, and Interview with Andrew Tanenbaum

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BSD
  • RETGUARD

    This year I went to BSDCAN in Ottawa.  I spent much of it in the 'hallway track', and had an extended conversation with various people regarding our existing security mitigations and hopes for new ones in the future.  I spoke a lot with Todd Mortimer.  Apparently I told him that I felt return-address protection was impossible, so a few weeks later he sent a clang diff to address that issue...

    The first diff is for amd64 and i386 only -- in theory RISC architectures can follow this approach soon.

  • t2k17 Hackathon Report: Ted Unangst OpenBSD with more ptys

     

    I did a bit of this and that, but the project that probably has the most interesting explanation has to do with pseudo terminals.

  • Interview with Andrew Tanenbaum

     

    Andrew Stuart Tanenbaum is an American computer scientist and professor emeritus of computer science at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam in the Netherlands. He is best known as the author of MINIX, a free Unix-like operating system for teaching purposes, and for his computer science textbooks, regarded as standard texts in the field. He regards his teaching job as his most important work. Since 2004 he has operated Electoral-vote.com, a website dedicated to analysis of polling data in federal elections in the United States.

BSD: FreeBSD 10.4 Beta, OpenBSD Foundation Receives Money From Smartisan

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BSD
  • FreeBSD 10.4 Enters Beta, Release Slated For October

    For those riding the FreeBSD 10 train and not yet prepared to jump on over to FreeBSD 11 with its recent v11.1 release, there is FreeBSD 10.4 being worked on.

    Available this weekend is the first beta for FreeBSD 10.4. This is the first beta snapshot of 10.4 while at least two more betas are coming before at least three release candidates and then in early October we should be seeing the official FreeBSD 10.4-RELEASE, per the schedule.

  • Smartisan Makes Another Iridium Donation to the OpenBSD Foundation

     

    For the second consecutive year, Smartisan (http://www.smartisan.com) has has made a donation of over CDN$100,000 to support OpenBSD and related projects.  

GCC 7.2 Release and LLVM Updates

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Development
GNU
BSD
  • GCC 7 Release Series

    The GNU project and the GCC developers are pleased to announce the release of GCC 7.2.

    This release is a bug-fix release, containing fixes for regressions in GCC 7.1 relative to previous releases of GCC.

  • GCC 7.2 Compiler Released

    Richard Biener of SUSE has just announced the release of the GNU Compiler Collection 7.2.

    GCC 7.2 is available this morning and is a point release to this year's GCC 7 stable release. This is the first point release since the GCC 7.1 release earlier this year, which was the first stable version of GCC 7.

  • More Sandy Bridge Scheduling Updates For LLVM

BSD: DragonFlyBSD and BSDCam

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BSD
  • DragonFlyBSD Finalizes Its Ryzen Workaround

    Separate from the AMD Ryzen performance marginality problem affecting Linux users, BSD users have been working on a workaround for their kernels to address problems with how their user stacks are mapped.

    A link circulating earlier this month was this FreeBSD commit to work around a guard page issue. Issues (funky behavior) can occur if code is running at the top of the user memory address space, so the workaround is to increase the guard page size. Linux has already had a large guard page while the BSDs have not, but they are now being increased for Ryzen.

  • BSDCam 2017 Trip Report: Michael Lucas

     

    BSDCam attendance is invitation only, and the facilities can only handle fifty folks or so. You need to be actively working on FreeBSD to wrangle an invite. Developers attend from all over the world. Yet, there’s no agenda. Robert Watson is the chair, but he doesn’t decide on the conference topics. He goes around the room and asks everyone to introduce themselves, say what they’re working on, and declare what they want to discuss during the conference. The topics of interest are tallied. The most popular topics get assigned time slots and one of the two big rooms. Folks interested in less popular topics are invited to claim one of the small breakout rooms.

Initial ARMv8.3-A Support Added To LLVM and LLVM 5.0 RC2 Released

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Development
BSD
  • Initial ARMv8.3-A Support Added To LLVM

    Initial enablement of the ARMv8.3-A architecture changes are now in place for the LLVM compiler infrastructure.

    The ARMv8.3-A update to the ARMv8 architecture include features pertaining to pointer authentication, nested virtualization, advanced SIMD complex number support, improved JavaScript type conversion support, changes to the memory consistency model, and an ID mechanism support for larger system-visible caches.

  • [llvm-dev] [5.0.0 Release] Release Candidate 2 tagged
  • LLVM 5.0 RC2 Released

    The second release candidate has been tagged for the upcoming LLVM 5.0 release.

    Hans Wennborg wrote that there are still "a bunch of open release blockers", but many patches have been merged since 5.0 RC1 so he is hoping for some fresh testing.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes
    Harry (Lei) Zhang, together with the CTO of HyperHQ, Xu Wang, will present “CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes” at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU 2018, May 2-4 in Copenhagen, Denmark. The presentation will clarify about more about CRI, container runtimes, KataContainers and where they are going. Please join them if you are interested in learning more.
  • Meet Gloo, the ‘Function Gateway’ That Unifies Legacy APIs, Microservices, and Serverless
    Gloo, a single binary file written in Go, can be deployed as a Kubernetes pod, in a Docker container, and now also on Cloud Foundry. The setup also requires a copy of Envoy, though the installation process can be greatly simplified through additional software developed by the company, TheTool. The user then writes configuration objects to capture the workflow logic.
  • Why is the kernel community replacing iptables with BPF?

    The Linux kernel community recently announced bpfilter, which will replace the long-standing in-kernel implementation of iptables with high-performance network filtering powered by Linux BPF, all while guaranteeing a non-disruptive transition for Linux users.

  • The developer of Helium Rain gave an update on their sales, low overall sales but a high Linux percentage
    Helium Rain [Steam, Official Site], the gorgeous space sim from Deimos Games is really quite good so it's a shame they've seen such low overall sales. In total, they've had around 14,000€ (~$17,000) in sales which is not a lot for a game at all. The good news, is that out of the two thousand copies they say they've sold, a huge 14% of them have come from Linux. It's worth noting, that number has actually gone up since we last spoke to them, where they gave us a figure of 11% sales on Linux.
  • Want to try Wild Terra Online? We have another load of keys to give away (update: all gone)
    Wild Terra Online [Steam], the MMO from Juvty Worlds has a small but dedicated following, now is your chance to see if it's for you.
  • Arch Linux Finally Rolling Out Glibc 2.27
    Arch Linux is finally transitioning to glibc 2.27, which may make for a faster system. Glibc 2.27 was released at the start of February. This updated GNU C Library shipped with many performance optimizations particularly for Intel/x86_64 but also some ARM tuning and more. Glibc 2.27 also has memory protection keys support and other feature additions, but the performance potential has been most interesting to us.
  • Installed nvidia driver
  • Stephen Smoogen: Fedora Infrastructure Hackathon (day 1-5)
  • Design and Web team summary – 20 April 2018
    The team manages all web projects across Canonical. From www.ubuntu.com to the Juju GUI we help to bring beauty and consistency to all the web projects.
  • Costales: UbuCon Europe 2018 | 1 Week to go!!
    We'll have an awesome weekend of conferences (with 4 parallel talks), podcasts, stands, social events... Most of them are in English, but there will be in Spanish & Asturian too.
  • Tough, modular embedded PCs start at $875
    Advantech has launched two rugged, Linux-ready embedded DIN-rail computers with Intel Bay Trail SoCs and iDoor expansion: an “UNO-1372G-E” with 3x GbE ports and a smaller UNO-1372G-J with only 2x GbE, but with more serial and USB ports.

OSS Leftovers

  • IRS Website Crash Reminder of HealthCare.gov Debacle as OMB Pushes Open Source
    OMB is increasingly pushing agencies to adopt open source solutions, and in 2016 launched a pilot project requiring at least 20 percent of custom developed code to be released as open source – partly to strengthen and help maintain it by tapping a community of developers. OMB memo M-16-21 further asks agencies to make any code they develop available throughout the federal government in order to encourage its reuse. “Open source solutions give agencies access to a broad community of developers and the latest advancements in technology, which can help alleviate the issues of stagnated or out-dated systems while increasing flexibility as agency missions evolve over time,” says Henry Sowell, chief information security officer at Hortonworks Federal. “Enterprise open source also allows government agencies to reduce the risk of vendor lock-in and the vulnerabilities of un-supported software,” he adds.
  • Migrations: the sole scalable fix to tech debt.

    Migrations are both essential and frustratingly frequent as your codebase ages and your business grows: most tools and processes only support about one order of magnitude of growth before becoming ineffective, so rapid growth makes them a way of life. This isn't because they're bad processes or poor tools, quite the opposite: the fact that something stops working at significantly increased scale is a sign that it was designed appropriately to the previous constraints rather than being over designed.

  • Gui development is broken

    Why is this so hard? I just want low-level access to write a simple graphical interface in a somewhat obscure language.

OpenBSD and NetBSD

Security: Twitter and Facebook

  • Twitter banned Kaspersky Lab from advertising in Jan
     

    Twitter has banned advertising from Russian security vendor Kaspersky Lab since January, the head of the firm, Eugene Kaspersky, has disclosed.  

  • When you go to a security conference, and its mobile app leaks your data
     

    A mobile application built by a third party for the RSA security conference in San Francisco this week was found to have a few security issues of its own—including hard-coded security keys and passwords that allowed a researcher to extract the conference's attendee list. The conference organizers acknowledged the vulnerability on Twitter, but they say that only the first and last names of 114 attendees were exposed.

  • The Security Risks of Logging in With Facebook
     

    In a yet-to-be peer-reviewed study published on Freedom To Tinker, a site hosted by Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy, three researchers document how third-party tracking scripts have the capability to scoop up information from Facebook's login API without users knowing. The tracking scripts documented by Steven Englehardt, Gunes Acar, and Arvind Narayanan represent a small slice of the invisible tracking ecosystem that follows users around the web largely without their knowledge.

  • Facebook Login data hijacked by hidden JavaScript trackers
     

    If you login to websites through Facebook, we've got some bad news: hidden trackers can suck up more of your data than you'd intended to give away, potentially opening it up to abuse.