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SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Operating System Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS

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SUSE

Linux kernel 4.14 LTS is the latest and greatest kernel for GNU/Linux distributions, and now that it's ready for mass deployments, it will arrive in the software repositories of more distros, and Tumbleweed users are among the first to get it as OpenSuSE Project's Douglas DeMaio reports today.

"The past week brought new features to openSUSE Tumbleweed with a snapshot that included Linux kernel 4.14," said DeMaio. "New features like HDMI Consumer Electronics Control support for Raspberry Pi and the merging of Heterogeneous Memory Management to the mainline this long-term support kernel are promising."

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GeckoLinux Beta Does openSuse Better

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Linux
Reviews
SUSE

GeckoLinux is an ideal option for switching to a new distro experience. I particularly like how the Cinnamon desktop works. Since I favor the Cinnamon environment in Linux Mint, changing over to GeckoLinux came with no difficulties. All the settings and features played out as expected.

Kudos to the developer for making GeckoLinux such a solid alternative computing platform. I did not expect a developing early beta to be so glitch-free.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Latest KDE Plasma 5.11.2 Desktop and Mesa 17.2.3

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SUSE

No less than seven snapshots have been released to the OpenSuSE Tumbleweed repositories during this week, which means it's at its highest capacity, bringing users some of the recent software updates and technologies. First off, users can now update to the latest KDE Plasma 5.11.2 desktop environment and KDE Frameworks 5.39.0 stack.

openSUSE Tumbleweed is now powered by the Linux 4.13.10 kernel and Mesa 17.2.3 graphics stack, and it also looks like latest SQLite 3.21.0 database engine and Mono 5.4.0 open-source .NET Framework implementation arrived as well, along with Ethtool 4.13, Postfix 3.2.4, Apparmor 2.11.1, SuSEfirewall2 3.6.369, libXfont 1.5.3, libxslt 1.1.30, Glib2 2.54.2, glib-networking 2.54.1, and appstream-glib 0.7.3.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Latest KDE Plasma 5.11.2 Desktop and Mesa 17.2.3

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SUSE

Back to publishing weekly reports about the latest updates landing in the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system, Dominique Leuenberger is reporting on the contents of the newest snapshots.

No less than seven snapshots have been released to the OpenSuSE Tumbleweed repositories during this week, which means it's at its highest capacity, bringing users some of the recent software updates and technologies. First off, users can now update to the latest KDE Plasma 5.11.2 desktop environment and KDE Frameworks 5.39.0 stack.

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openSUSE-Based GeckoLinux Distro Getting Smoother and More Reliable Startup

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SUSE

The developer of GeckoLinux, a GNU/Linux distribution based on both openSUSE Leap and Tumbleweed operating systems, announced the release of a beta preview of the next stable GeckoLinux Static series.

It's been quiet lately for GeckoLinux, and it has to do with the merging of SUSE Studio with the Open Build Service (OBS) distribution development platform, which forced the developer to find an alternative build method of his distro. After a long search, it appears that Kiwi on VPS is the best method for GeckoLinux.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed to Soon Switch to OpenSSL 1.1 by Default, Samba 4.7 Lands

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SUSE

Another week has passed, and OpenSuSE Tumbleweed users received no less than seven snapshots, which brought numerous of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source applications, including the Linux 4.13.9 kernel, KDE Plasma 5.11.1 desktop environment, and KDE Applications 17.08.2 software stack.

The LibreOffice office suite has been updated to version 5.4.2, the Qt and Samba stacks were bumped to newer releases, namely 5.9.2 and 4.7.0 respectively. On top of that, LLVM4 has been reworked into a single libLLVM library, and Display Manager is no longer resolved through /etc/sysconfig/displaymanager.

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SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Beta 1 open source operating system available for download

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SUSE

Linux powers the most popular mobile operating system, Android. It is also what many of the world's servers run. Despite this, people still think Linux is merely a hobby or niche project -- sorry, folks, it isn't. Even Microsoft has seen the light regarding Linux -- Bill Gates runs Android and the Windows Store hosts popular Linux distributions.

True, Linux does not have significant market share on consumer desktops, but it is extremely important to the enterprise -- arguably more important. This is why Red Hat Inc is so successful with its Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating system. RHEL isn't the only game in town, however; SUSE Linux Enterprise is a viable alternative for servers, workstations, and more. Today, version 15 of the operating system gets its first beta, and you can begin testing it immediately.

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Servers: PaaS, Containers, SUSE, and Fedora

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Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • Platform-as-a-Service: The Key to Running a Continuous Deployment Pipeline

    A six-year veteran of continuously deploying swarms of microservices to various Platform-as-a-Service environments, Ben Dodd kicked off a recent London Continuous Delivery Meetup by asking: What is the relationship you want to have with your Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS)?

    Using the following metaphor of “Pizza-as-a-Service,” he says you’re only supposed to concentrate on what you want to accomplish, only focusing on the immediate task at hand: “Only care about our pizza, everything else is someone else’s concern.”

  • But I don't know what a container is

    I've been speaking about security in DevOps—also known as "DevSecOps"*—at a few conferences and seminars recently, and I've started to preface the discussion with a quick question: "Who here understands what a container is?" Usually I don't see many hands going up,**  so I've started briefly explaining what containers*** are before going much further.

    To be clear: You can do DevOps without containers, and you can do DevSecOps without containers. But containers lend themselves so well to the DevOps approach—and to DevSecOps, it turns out—that even though it's possible to do DevOps without them, I'm going to assume that most people will use containers.

  • A World without Open Source? [Ed: SUSE never heard of GNU and Free software. History started in 1991.]

    Open source opens a space for bright ideas and the accomplishment of projects – together. The most impressive example is probably the history of Linux. Starting in 1991 as the invention of Finnish student Linus Torvalds, today Linux is the foundation for many of our everyday tools: from operating systems for PCs and servers (such as SUSE or Debian) to smart-phones (Android) and other mobile devices.

  • IBM Cloud to get SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications
  • Fedora 27 Isn't Ready For Release, Fedora Modular Server Pushed Back To December

    Open blocker bugs are preventing Fedora 27 from being released next week.

    Even after the Fedora 27 Beta delays, developers were trying hard to get F27 out on time, but that simply isn't going to happen this cycle. At today's Go/No-Go meeting, they decided it will be delayed at least one week.

    There are still a few open blocker bugs and as such will have another meeting next Thursday to see if it's ready for release at that point.

  • Bodhi 3.0.0 released.

SUSE and Red Hat News

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Red Hat
SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux OS Patched Against WPA2 KRACK Bug, GCC 6 Now Removed

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SUSE

If you're using the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system, you should know that one of the latest snapshots removed the GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 6 packages from the default install and patched it against the WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability.

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Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.

First Renesas based Raspberry Pi clone runs Linux

iWave’s “iW-RainboW-G23S” SBC runs Linux on a Renesas RZ/G1C, and offers -20 to 85°C support and expansion headers including a RPi-compatible 40-pin link. iWave’s iW-RainboW-G23S is the first board we’ve seen to tap the Renesas RZ/G1C SoC, which debuted earlier this year. It’s also the first Renesas based SBC we’ve seen that features the increasingly ubiquitous Raspberry Pi 85 x 56mm footprint, layout, and RPi-compatible 40-pin expansion connector. The board is also notable for providing -20 to 85°C temperature support. Read more Also: GameShell Is An Open Source And Linux-powered Retro Game Console That You’ll Love

Games: SuperTuxKart, Tannenberg, Observer