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SUSE

Latest Tumbleweed Snapshot Brings Major Versions of Flatpak, qemu, Thunderbird, Nano

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SUSE

Since the last openSUSE Tumbleweed update, three snapshots have been released and the latest snapshot has brought two new major versions of both Flatpak and qemu.

On the heels of the Libre Application Summit last week, which is a conference focusing on sandboxing and application distribution, a new major version of Flatpak was released in Snapshot 20180911. Flatpak 1.0 marks a significant improvement in performance and reliability, and includes a big collection of bug fixes with a collection of new features. Naturally, libostree 2018.8 was updated with Flatpak and added a new feature that provides an auto-update-summary config option for repositories. Full-system emulation with qemu 3.0.0 isn’t necessarily significant. The changelog states not to “read anything into the major version number update. It’s been decided to increase the major version number each year.” Yet there is improved support for nested Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) guests running on Hyper-V. The project did emphasized that ongoing feature deprecation is tracked at both http://wiki.qemu-project.org/Features/LegacyRemoval and in Appendix B of the qemu-doc.* files installed with the qemu package. Mesa 18.1.7 had a handful of fixes and once again added wayland to egl_platforms. The Linux Kernel 4.18.7 added support for Intel Ice Lake microarchitecture in the snapshot. There were several other minor updates in the snapshot, but the nodejs10 update to version 10.9.0 brought a few Common Vulnerability and Exposure (CVE) fixes and upgraded dependencies to OpenSSL 1.0.2.

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My open source career (by Cornelius Schumacher, SUSE)

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SUSE

My learning experience in the free software community went beyond technology. I also learned a lot about people, about how they work together, about organization, about leadership. I became a member of the board of KDE e.V., the foundation behind the KDE community, and this was the ideal place to learn about a lot of the non-technical aspects.
I’m an engineering manager and distinguished engineer at SUSE today. My free software work was essential in developing the technical skills which make me a distinguished engineer and the leadership skills which make me a manager. I’m still contributing to free software. It’s part of my job. It still is a way to learn, and it keeps me grounded.

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Also: openSUSE.Asia Summit

SUSE Continues Working On Transactional Updates With Btrfs

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SUSE

While Red Hat and several other Linux vendors have either deprecated Btrfs support or at least not embraced it like they originally talked up this "next-gen file-system" years ago, SUSE has continued supporting Btrfs both with openSUSE and SUSE Linux Enterprise.

SUSE continues shipping openSUSE/SLE with Btrfs on the root file-system and through that have been offering up some nifty features, including support for transactional updates.

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SUSE Touts Financial Growth, Hints at Future Acquisitions

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SUSE

SUSE will soon have a new owner, but it remains focused on easing the cloud native migration path for enterprise customers. In an interview with SDxCentral at this week’s Open Source Summit event in Vancouver, British Columbia, SUSE CTO Thomas Di Giacomo said the company plans to invest more into its core operations, but will also look at new acquisitions.

That investment push comes on the heels of Swedish private equity fund EQT VIII announcing plans to acquire SUSE for $2.5 billion. SUSE has been owned by Micro Focus since late 2014 where it has operated as a semi-independent business under CEO Nils Brauckmann.

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GeckoLinux 150 Static Plasma review - Not quite

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Reviews
SUSE

GeckoLinux 150 was supposed to be the cure to all openSUSE Leap 15 ailments. It is not. I was expecting flawless results on all fronts, but then there were big issues with multimedia playback and associated performance, visual glitches, imperfect smartphone support, and of course, the graphics driver bomb. This hardly warrants the effort. I also didn't mention various crashes - the kgreeter crash on logout, every time - but they were there, too. Samba issues, printing issues, and the list goes on. The good things are nice and commendable, but there must be a stable base.

However, the real dealbreaker is the Nvidia setup. This is supposed to just work. If it works in a dozen other distros on this same box, then it should continue working. And I'm certain this has nothing to do with Nvidia drivers but with how the repo contents were compiled and packaged. Then, no easy rescue, none of that SUSE enterprise-like resilience. Finally, you do gain some, but not enough to justify the experience. I will sample Gecko sometime in the future again, but the bad karma around openSUSE remains. So long.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.18, Introduces AV1 Support

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SUSE

Even though it's the holidays season and most developers take a break from all the heavy work they do all year, the OpenSuSE Tumbleweed operating system continues to receive some of the freshest updates, and this week it received a major kernel bump with the latest Linux 4.18 kernel series, which brings lots of new features.

"The most recent snapshot, 20180818, updated the kernel to version 4.18.0, which brought many changes for KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine)," said Douglas DeMaio. "Netfilter project nftables was restored as the default backend with firewalld 0.6.1 and now nftables and iptables can co-exist after a bug fix with the 'nat' table form the [Linux] 4.18 kernel."

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Tumbleweed Snapshots Bring Changes for KVM, QEMU, Xen

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SUSE

The most recent snapshot, 20180818, updated the kernel to version 4.18.0, which brought many changes for KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine). Mozilla Firefox 61.0.2 improved website rendering with the Retained Display List feature enabled and also fixed broken DevTools panels. The ffmpeg 4.0.2 package in the snapshot added conditional package configuration and AOMedia Video 1 (AV1) support. Netfilter project nftables was restored as the default backend with firewalld 0.6.1 and now nftables and iptables can co-exist after a bug fix with the ‘nat’ table form the 4.18 kernel. The Command Line Interface configuration utility for wireless devices known as iw added support in its 4.14 for all new kernel features of kernel 4.14. The HTTP client/server library for GNOME, libsoup 2.62.3, now uses an atomic-refcounting in classes that are not using GObject-refcounting. The Linux Kernel 4.16 or higher is needed for the strace 4.24 package, which implemented decoding of KVM vcpu (virtual central processing unit) exit reason as an option, and yast2-http-server 4.1.1 fixed PHP support by dropping php5 and using php7.

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SUSE is Still Working for Microsoft

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Microsoft
SUSE

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Operating System Support Extended Until June 30, 2019

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SUSE

Launched on July 26, 2017, the OpenSuSE Leap 42.3 operating system is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack (SP) 3 and the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series. Like previous openSUSE Leap 42 point releases, openSUSE Leap 42.3 was supposed to receive 18 months of support, until January 2019.

However, both the openSUSE Project and parent company SUSE decided to give users more time to upgrade to the latest openSUSE Leap 15 release, which is based on the SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15 operating system series, by continuing to deliver updates to the openSUSE Leap 42.3 release, and the openSUSE Leap 42 series, for six more months.

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OpenSUSE/SUSE: openSUSE Leap 42.3 and Kubic's Change of Heart

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Leap 42.3 Operating System Support Extended Until June 30, 2019

    The openSUSE Project announced this week that they'd extended support for the openSUSE Leap 42.3 operating system with six more months to allow more users to upgrade to the latest openSUSE Leap 15 release.

    Launched on July 26, 2017, the openSUSE Leap 42.3 operating system is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack (SP) 3 and the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series. Like previous openSUSE Leap 42 point releases, openSUSE Leap 42.3 was supposed to receive 18 months of support, until January 2019.

  • An Exciting New Direction

    It’s been over a year since we started the Kubic project, and it’s worth looking back over the last months and evaluating where we’ve succeeded, where we haven’t, and sharing with you all our plans for the future.

  • OpenSUSE Kubic Shifts Focus Following Self-Reflection

    OpenSUSE's Kubic project that has been home to their container-related technologies as well as the atomicly-updated openSUSE "MicroOS" will be making some changes.

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More in Tux Machines

What’s New in Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS is the latest release of Ubuntu budgie. As part of Ubuntu 18.04 flavor this release ships with latest Budgie desktop 10.4 as default desktop environment. Powered by Linux 4.15 kernel and shipping with the same internals as Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), the Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS official flavor will be supported for 3 years, until April 2021. Prominent new features include support for adding OpenVNC connections through the NetworkManager applet, better font handling for Chinese and Korean languages, improved keyboard shortcuts, color emoji support for GNOME Characters and other GNOME apps, as well as window-shuffler capability. Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS also ships with a new exciting GTK+ theme by default called Pocillo, support for dynamic workspaces, as well as a “minimal installation” option in the graphical installer that lets users install Ubuntu Budgie with only the Chromium web browser and a handful of basic system utilities. Read more

Red Hat: Boston, US Government, OpenShift Route, VirtualBox and More

  • BU Spark! teams up with Red Hat, hosts software design workshop
    Students traveled across Boston to its Fort Point neighborhood to attend a BU Spark! workshop about interaction design Friday. There they delved into interaction design and explored how to develop user-friendly software. BU Spark! and Red Hat Inc. hosted the Interaction Design Bootcamp jointly at Red Hat’s Boston office. BU students and Spark! Interaction design fellows attended. Red Hat is a software company that specializes in information technology and has a research relationship with Boston University that includes educational elements. The programs taught by Red Hat focus on user experience design, one of Red Hat’s specializations, according to their website.
  • Open source can spark innovative business transformation in government, Red Hat leaders say
    The federal government, largely hamstrung by legacy systems, is in need of a major digital transformation. Open source technology can be the spark that sets off that revolution, leaders from open-source software company Red Hat said Tuesday. “The types of technologies that you choose matter,” said Mike Walker, global director of Open Innovation Labs at Red Hat. “It will influence the way your business operates and open new doors to new business process, and ultimately allow you to become a software company that can achieve some of those innovations and reductions in cost and time.”
  • Kubernetes Ingress vs OpenShift Route
    Although pods and services have their own IP addresses on Kubernetes, these IP addresses are only reachable within the Kubernetes cluster and not accessible to the outside clients. The Ingress object in Kubernetes, although still in beta, is designed to signal the Kubernetes platform that a certain service needs to be accessible to the outside world and it contains the configuration needed such as an externally-reachable URL, SSL, and more. Creating an ingress object should not have any effects on its own and requires an ingress controller on the Kubernetes platform in order to fulfill the configurations defined by the ingress object. Here at Red Hat, we saw the need for enabling external access to services before the introduction of ingress objects in Kubernetes, and created a concept called Route for the same purpose (with additional capabilities such as splitting traffic between multiple backends, sticky sessions, etc). Red Hat is one of the top contributors to the Kubernetes community and contributed the design principles behind Routes to the community which heavily influenced the Ingress design.
  • VirtualBox DRM/KMS Driver Proceeding With Atomic Mode-Setting Support
    The "vboxvideo" DRM/KMS driver for use by VirtualBox guest virtual machines that has been part of the mainline Linux kernel the past several cycles will soon see atomic mode-setting support. Hans de Goede of Red Hat, who has been stewarding this driver into the Linux kernel after Oracle has failed to do so, is tackling the atomic mode-setting as his latest advancement to this driver important for a VirtualBox desktop VM experience. Published today were initial patches preparing the move to atomic mode-setting but not yet the full migration to this modern display API that offers numerous benefits.
  • A Roadblock Ahead? – Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Ingersoll-Rand Plc (IR)
  • Red Hat Shares Have Even Upside-Downside Profile, JPMorgan Says In Downgrade
  • Earnings Preview: Red Hat poised to deliver earnings growth for Q2
  • J.P. Morgan Securities Slams Red Hat Stock With Downgrade Before Earnings
  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Moves Lower on Volume Spike for September 18

IBM Looking to Distract From Recent Reports That it Helped Police Racially Profile the Public (by Openwashing)

Linux, the Linux Foundation and Graphics

  • Linux Patches Surface For Supporting The Creative Sound BlasterX AE-5
    Last year Creative Labs introduced the Sound BlasterX AE-5 PCI Express gaming sound card while finally there are some patches pending for supporting this high-end sound card in Linux. Connor McAdams who most recently got the Creative Recon3D support into good shape on Linux has now been working on getting the Sound BlasterX AE-5 working well on Linux.
  • Blockchain Training Takes Off
    Meanwhile, job postings related to blockchain and Hyperledger are taking off, and knowledge in these areas is translating into opportunity. Careers website Glassdoor lists thousands of job posts related to blockchain.
  • AMD Picasso Support Comes To The RadeonSI OpenGL Driver
    Last week AMD sent out initial support for yet-to-be-released "Picasso" APUs with the Linux AMDGPU kernel graphics driver. Today on the user-space side the support was merged for the OpenGL RadeonSI Gallium3D driver. Picasso details are still fairly light but they are expected to be similar to Raven Ridge and for the AM4 processor socket as well as an edition for notebooks. On the same day as publishing the Picasso AMDGPU kernel patches, AMD also went ahead and published the Linux patches for the "Raven 2" APUs too.
  • The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Arrives For Linux Benchmarking
    It looks like NVIDIA has their launch-day Linux support in order for the GeForce RTX 2080 "Turing" graphics cards slated to ship later this week as arriving today at Phoronix was the RTX 2080 Ti. The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti is NVIDIA's new flagship desktop GPU with the Turing GPU architecture, 4352 CUDA cores, a 1635MHz boost clock speed rating for this Founder's Edition model, 11GB of GDDR6 video memory yielding a 616 GB/s memory bandwidth rating, and designed to suit real-time ray-tracing workloads with their RTX technology. Pricing on the RTX 2080 Ti Founder's Edition is $1,199 USD. Last week NVIDIA published more details on the Turing architecture for those interested as well as on the new mesh shader capability.