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SUSE

SUSE and Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Skuba on SUSE CaaS Platform 4

    With SUSE CaaS Platform 4 we heard our customers feedback and decided to change what the lifecycle of the platform looks like.

    Previous versions of SUSE CaaS Platform included an administrator node that despite being useful for managing the whole platform, was another component to take care of, and an extra machine to take into account when deploying the platform.

    This administrator node used Salt to set up and maintain the Kubernetes cluster among the different nodes comprising your cluster.

    During this time, your feedback has been that a little more flexibility on the deployment was appreciated, so you could experiment with slightly different setups, even if they were for proof of concepts while you were fleshing out the details of production clusters.

  • Kubernetes Rolling Update Strategy in our production infra

    Kubernetes rolling update strategy means suppose we are running pod (containers) in our live infra and we want to update new changes into our running pod like build update, confrontational changes etc. While deployment new pod with new changes suppose our containers got stuck or failed due to any reason.

    So, we have to redeploy old pod with old changes again to avoid downtime of our application. This complete process is called rolling update strategy in Kubernetes.

    Kubernetes rolling update strategy

    Before moving to next we should aware about new pod deployment strategy of Kubernetes means how many new pods it will deploy at a time without taking downtime. Because high availability of our website is our first priority. So, while deploying new pod Kubernetes will deploy 25% or you can say one fourth of the total pod. Suppose we are running four pods first it will terminate 25% of total pod means one pod. Then it will launch 25% new pod and so on.

  • Tackle OpenStack networking woes with SUSE OpenStack Cloud Crowbar

    By far, the most difficult aspect of successfully deploying OpenStack is getting the networking right, a challenge that has caused many a well-intentioned IT team to throw up its hands and toss in the towel. Fortunately, SUSE OpenStack Cloud removes much of that pain by automating most of the network deployment and dramatically simplifying custom network set-ups.

  • Grow your virtualization environments without breaking the bank

    An IT director at a large financial services company shares the benefits and cost reductions they’ve experienced by switching to Red Hat Virtualization. In just three years, it’s paved the way for an efficient, stable and cost-effective virtualization environment.

  • How to Handle OpenShift Worker Nodes Resources in Overcommitted State

    One of the benefits in adopting a system like OpenShift is facilitating burstable and scalable workload. Horizontal application scaling involves adding or removing instances of an application to match demand. When OpenShift schedules a Pod, it’s important that the nodes have enough resources to actually run it. If a user schedules a large application (in the form of Pod) on a node with limited resources , it is possible for the node to run out of memory or CPU resources and for things to stop working!

    It’s also possible for applications to take up more resources than they should. This could be caused by a team spinning up more replicas than they need to artificially decrease latency or simply because of a configuration change that causes a program to go out of control and try to use 100% of the available CPU resources. Regardless of whether the issue is caused by a bad developer, bad code, or bad luck, what’s important is how a cluster administrator can manage and maintain control of the resources.

    In this blog, let’s take a look at how you can solve these problems using best practices.

  • How the new Quarkus extension for Visual Studio Code improves the development experience

    Earlier this year, we were introduced to Quarkus, the next-generation, container-first framework for Java applications. As expected, such new frameworks and technologies make way for new developer tools focused on making the development experience even better.

    The recent Quarkus extension for Visual Studio Code release aims to do just that, by bringing features specific to Quarkus project development within VS Code. The new VS Code extension is dependent on a couple of Java extensions for VS Code, so it is recommended that you have the Java Extension Pack installed. This article outlines what the Quarkus extension for VS Code has to offer: convenient features for an already convenient Java framework.

Firefox, Graphene, Krita update in Tumbleweed

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SUSE

Two openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week.

The snapshots furnished the update for KDE Applications 19.08.1 and updated several libraries including Intel’s Graphene library OS.

Snapshot 20190917 delivered four packages. The Graphene package updated to 1.10.0 and now uses an ancillary library called (micro) µTest for its test suite, which makes possible to build and run the test suite without depending on GLib. Mozilla Firefox 69.0 provided Enhanced Tracking Protection (ETP) with stronger privacy protections and added support for receiving multiple video codecs to makes it easier for WebRTC conferencing services to mix video from different clients. The other two package updates in the snapshot were icecream 1.3, which takes compile jobs from a build and distributes it among remote machines allowing a parallel build, and the HTTP client/server library for GNOME libsoup 2.66.3. The update of icecream 1.3 improved the speed of creating compiler tarballs. The snapshot is trending at a moderately stable rating of 87, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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Server: Ubuntu 19.10 Release Schedule, IBM LinuxONE III with Ubuntu and SUSE on Cloud Foundry Foundation and More LF

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Server
SUSE
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 19.10 Release Schedule and Expected Features

    This is a continually updated article to inform you about Ubuntu 19.10 release date, features and other important things associated with it.

    The development for Ubuntu 19.10 is nearing its end and it’s time to look at what new features and improvement this new release brings.

    Ubuntu 19.10 is an important release because it will set the course of development for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (long term support). I have always felt that the LTS version release takes a lot of features from its predecessor.

    In other words, Ubuntu 19.10 will be a glimpse of the features you would be getting in Ubuntu 20.04.

  • Announcing the new IBM LinuxONE III with Ubuntu

    Enterprises today need the most secure, and flexible system to support their initiatives, and for that system to grow and evolve for tomorrow. The latest LinuxONE system was designed to support mission-critical initiatives and allow enterprises to be innovative as they design and scale their environment. LinuxONE III provides features for advanced data protection and privacy, enterprise resiliency and scalability, and cloud enablement and integration.

    Reliability and continuity are critical to the success of any business. With this release, they’ll benefit from up to 10:1 consolidation for key workloads, and up to 190 cores and 40TB of memory. And with 99.999%* availability and up to 7.4x better resilience, enterprises can confidently run and scale their business-critical workloads. The new LinuxONE III provides the highest levels of availability and scalability, so business-critical workloads run flawlessly, recover quickly, and grow seamlessly.

  • Project Quarks: Native Cloud Foundry for Kubernetes

    At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit EU in the Netherlands, Vlad Iovanov of SUSE gave a keynote demo of Project Quarks, the project that integrates Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes, by packaging the Cloud Foundry Application Runtime as containers instead of virtual machines. Vlad explains the current capabilities of Quarks, with a look at its future as a Kubernetes Operator. It’s a fairly technical topic, but Vlad uses creative diagrams and an understandable demo to show the power of Quarks.

    Cloud Foundry Foundation has posted all recorded talks from CF Summit EU on YouTube. Check them out if you want to learn more about what is happening in the Cloud Foundry world! I’ll be posting more SUSE Cloud Application Platform talks here over the coming days. Watch Vlad’s talk below...

  • Broad Deployment Of Cloud Foundry Almost Double In Just 2 Years

    As businesses embark on their digital transformation journey, developers are driving innovation across cloud native environments for building into the future. According to a recently released report by Cloud Foundry Foundation, 45 percent of user respondents describe their Cloud Foundry use as “broad” compared to 30 percent in 2018 and 24 percent in 2017. The report also revealed that 39 percent of developers are deploying applications in less than one day.

    What points out towards a healthy and growing community of developers is the fact that almost one in five respondents started using Cloud Foundry in just the last 12 months.

  • The Linux Foundation to Host Open Source Project for Drone Aviation Interoperability

    The Linux Foundation today announced it will host the InterUSS Platform Open Source Project to enable trusted, secure and scalable interoperability between UAS Service Suppliers (USSs) that advances safe, equitable and efficient drone operations. Initial contributors include both industry and regulatory organizations Wing, AirMap, Uber and the Swiss Federal Office of Civil Aviation (FOCA).

    Similar to the evolution of cities, our skies are becoming busier with traffic. In an effort to unleash innovation and ensure safety, aviation regulators around the world are implementing UAS Traffic Management (UTM, also referred to as U-Space) to support rapidly increasing and highly diverse drone operations. Under UTM, a set of USSs (also known as U-Space Service Providers orUSPs) assist drone operators to conduct safe and compliant operations. USSs can provide service in overlapping airspace and share data when required to support services such as a strategic deconfliction of flight plans and remote identification and industry is developing standards for this data sharing through organizations such as ASTM International. The InterUSS Project provides a forum for collaboration and development of standards-compliant, open source implementations that facilitate communication in the UTM/U-Space environment.

SUSE: Containers, IBM, Predictions and Openwashing SAP

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SUSE
  • Demystifying Containers – Part III: Container Images

    This series of blog posts and corresponding talks aims to provide you with a pragmatic view on containers from a historic perspective. Together we will discover modern cloud architectures layer by layer, which means we will start at the Linux Kernel level and end up at writing our own secure cloud native applications.

    Simple examples paired with the historic background will guide you from the beginning with a minimal Linux environment up to crafting secure containers, which fit perfectly into todays’ and futures’ orchestration world. In the end it should be much easier to understand how features within the Linux kernel, container tools, runtimes, software defined networks and orchestration software like Kubernetes are designed and how they work under the hood.

  • Announcing the new IBM LinuxONE III – Combined with SUSE for One of the Most Secure Platforms on the Planet

    Our guest blog writer is Kara Todd, Director of Linux at IBM with an exciting announcement from IBM – with SUSE Linux Enterprise playing an integral role!
    Announcing the new IBM LinuxONE III – the system you need for the most secure, flexible system to support your initiatives today, and you need that system to grow and evolve with you for tomorrow. The latest LinuxONE system was designed to support your mission-critical initiatives and allow you to be innovative as you design and scale your environment. LinuxONE III provides features for advanced data protection and privacy, enterprise resiliency and scalability, and cloud enablement and integration. These tools set the foundation to enable you to build with flexibility, deliver with confidence, and protect the future.

  • Top 10 Technology Predictions for 2019 Revisited – Here’s my Personal Performance Appraisal

    Open source continues to play a key role in all these other dominant technology trends. That’s why 82% of large organizations are more receptive to open source than they were 5 years ago, and 83% of hiring managers are looking for open source talent as a priority.

    So, how did I do overall with my predictions?

    Based on my own appraisal, I scored a creditable 9/10, and I’m feeling pretty good about that. However, I guess I wasn’t taking a huge risk. By way of full disclosure, I track all of these trends as part of my role at SUSE, and as a leading technology partner, SUSE works very closely with all its customers.

  • Introduction to SUSE Linux Enterprise is now available on openSAP

SUSE: YaST Development Sprint 84 and SUSE 'in Space'

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SUSE
  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 84

    The YaST Team finished yet another development sprint last week and we want to take the opportunity to let you all glance over the engine room to see what’s going on.

    Today we will confess an uncomfortable truth about how we manage the Qt user interface, will show you how we organize our work (or at least, how we try to keep the administrative part of that under control) and will give you a sneak peak on some upcoming YaST features and improvements.

    Let’s go for it!

  • Lunar Vacation Planning

    HPE, one of SUSE’s most important partners in High-Performance Computing and the advancement of science and technology, is now building NASA’s new supercomputer named “Aitken” to support Artemis and future human missions to the moon. HPE’s “Aitken” supercomputer will be built at NASA’s Ames Research Center and will run SUSE Linux Enterprise HPC (co-located where the Pleiades supercomputer – also SUSE-based – has been advancing research for several years). Aitken will run extremely complex simulations for entry, descent and landing on the moon as part of the Artemis program. The missions include landing the next humans on the lunar south polar region by 2024 (on the rim of the Shackleton crater, which experiences constant indirect sunlight for a toasty -300 degrees Fahrenheit).

SUSE CaaS

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SUSE
  • The Next SUSE CaaS Platform is Here!

    The SUSE CaaS Platform team is excited to announce the availability of our new version 4 – a container management solution that is easier to deploy and manage at scale, richer than ever in security and control, and ready with the latest innovations!

  • SUSE Bolsters Security, Advanced Networking in SUSE CaaS Platform 4

    SUSE has revamped its SUSE CaaS Platform with a wide range of updates, including advanced networking for Kubernetes that will make it easier to configure networking with the platform, and has also bolstered its SUSE Cloud Application Platform with refinements such as improved user interface features.

    The biggest improvement to SUSE Container as a Service (CaaS) Platform 4, which is built for application developers, DevOps teams and Kubernetes container platform operators, is the new advanced networking for Kubernetes which is being brought in via the Cilium open source project, according to SUSE. Cilium works to transparently secure network connectivity between application services deployed using Linux container management platforms like Docker and Kubernetes.

Applications, PostgreSQL, Zypper Packages Update in Tumbleweed

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SUSE

The snapshots brought an update of KDE Plasma and Applications along with an update for the input framework ibus, two PostgreSQL versions and the command line package manager zypper.

KDE Applications 19.08.1 improvements to Kontact, Dolphin, Kdenlive, Konsole, Step, and more arrived in snapshot 20190909. Several regressions in Konsole’s tab handling were fixed and olphin again starts correctly when in split-view mode. The updated of the anti-virus package clamav 0.101.4 address two Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures. The GNOME web browser package epiphany 3.32.5 fixed a memory corruption and broken web process extension connection when using WebKit trunk. An update of links 2.20.1 brought stability improvements and also addressed a bug when connected with tor would send real dns requests outside the tor network when the displayed page contains link elements with rel=dns-prefetch. The Plasma desktop received a minor update to 5.16.5 and fixed KWayland-integration builds with recent frameworks and Qt 5.13. Some notifications were changed in the new minor version and the some functionality was improved for current weather conditions. The qrencode 4.0.2 package improved support for cmake. The snapshot was trending at a rating of 84, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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Server: Red Hat, Intel and SUSE

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Linux
Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • Introduction to virtio-networking and vhost-net

    In this post we have scratched the surface of the virtio-networking ecosystem, introducing you to the basic building blocks of virtualization and networking used by virtio-networking. We have briefly covered the virtio spec and the vhost protocol, reviewed the frontend and backend architecture used for implementing the virtio interface and have taken you through the vhost-net/virtio-net architecture of vhost-net (host kernel) communicating with virtio-net (guest kernel).

    A fundamental challenge we had when trying to explain things was the historical overloading of terms. As one example, virtio-net refers both to the virtio networking device implementation in the virtio specification and also to the guest kernel front end described in the vhost-net/virtio-net architecture. We attempted to address this by explaining the context of terms and using virtio-net to only describe the guest kernel frontend.

    As will be explained in later posts, there are other implementations for the virtio spec networking device based on using DPDK and different hardware offloading techniques which are all under the umbrella of the virtio-networking.

    The next two posts are intended to provide a deeper understanding of the vhost-net/virtio-net architecture. One post will be intended for architects providing a technical deep dive into the vhost-net/virtio-net and explaining how in practice the data plane and control planes are implemented. The other post intended for developers will be a hands on session including Ansible scripts to enable experimenting with the vhost-net/virtio-net architecture.

    If you prefer high level overviews we recommend you keep an eye out for the virtio-networking and DPDK introductions, to be published in the upcoming weeks.

  • Intel Issues Second Release Of Its Rust-Written Cloud-Hypervisor For Modern Linux VMs

    Intel's open-source crew has released version 0.2 of its primarily Rust-developed Cloud Hypervisor and associated firmware also in Rust.

    The Intel Cloud Hypervisor is their experimental VMM running atop KVM designed for modern Linux distributions and VirtIO para-virtualized devices without any legacy device support.

  • Announcing SUSE CaaS Platform 4

    SUSE CaaS Platform 4 raises the bar for robust Kubernetes platform operations with enhancements that expand platform scalability options, strengthen application security, and make it easier to keep pace with technology advancements. Integrating the latest releases of Kubernetes and SUSE Linux Enterprise, SUSE CaaS Platform 4 continues to provide industry leading application delivery capabilities as an enterprise-ready solution.

  • A new era in Cloud Native Application Delivery is here
  • 3 Infrastructure Compliance Best Practices for DevOps

    For most IT organizations, the need for compliance goes without saying. Internal corporate policies and external regulations like HIPAA and Sarbanes Oxley require compliance. Businesses in heavily regulated industries like healthcare, financial services, and public service are among those with the greatest need for strong compliance programs.

Multiple YaST Packages, Major Versions of Gawk, Swig Update in Tumbleweed

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SUSE

The snapshots brought two new major versions and two Linux Kernel updates.

Snapshot 20190902 brought the second Linux Kernel update for the week with an update of kernel 5.2.11; the new kernel brought several fixes for ASoC audio drivers. The snapshot also provided an updated version of Ceph to address a Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures.The IRC Client irssi 1.2.2 version fixed a crash and libreoffice 6.3.1.1 removed some patches. The updated libsolv 0.7.6 fixed repository priority handling for multiversion packages and the network discovery and security auditing utility nmap 7.80 resolved a compatibility issue with OpenSSL library configured with security level 2. Qt4 support was removed with the polkit-qt5-1 version 0.113.0. MicroOS integration tests and an added required cryptomount coding for EFI boot were added with core appliance builder python-kiwi 9.18.12. The interface compiler connecting programs written in C and C++ with scripting languages, Swig, received the 4.0 update in the snapshot; the new major version improves support for parsing C++11 and C++14 code and removes php5 support. Several YaST packages updated the name type X-SuSE-YaST-AutoInstResource. The snapshot is trending at a rating of 88, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190829 updated three packages. The three package updates were freeipmi 1.6.4, texlive-specs-m and texlive-specs-n. The snapshot recorded a moderate rating of 90, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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Also: Want to quickly connect OpenStack and Ceph? SUSE OpenStack Cloud has you covered

SUSE and Red Hat: Gerald Pfeifer, SUSE Selling SAP, Red Hat on Sysadmins

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • openSUSE Is A Community Of Communities: Gerald Pfeifer

    Gerald Pfeifer, a seasoned open source developer and CTO of SUSE EMEA, has been appointed the new chair of the openSUSE board. We talked to Pfeifer to better understand the role of the openSUSE board, the relationship between the company and the community, and the status of the openSUSE Foundation.

  • Linux And Kubernetes Support The Intelligent Enterprise

    The concept of the intelligent enterprise has arrived in SAP user companies. Now, they need intelligent infrastructures. Linux and Kubernetes can help.
    SAP has been focusing a lot of its efforts on introducing the intelligent enterprise to its customers – and it has succeeded. Many user companies are currently trying to become intelligent.

    The concept of the intelligent enterprise serves as an aspiration, a favorable goal on their digitalization path. Various SAP solutions promise to get them there: S/4, in-memory database Hana, SAP Cloud Platform (SCP), C/4 Hana, SAP Cloud Analytics, SAP Data Hub, cloud solutions like Qualtrics or SuccessFactors, or Leonardo.

  • A guide to human communication for sysadmins

    Not too long ago, I spoke at a tech event in the Netherlands to an audience mostly made up of sysadmins. One of my topics was how sysadmins can increase the value they deliver to the organization they work for. I believe that among the most important factors for delivering value is for everyone to know the overall organization's priorities and goals, as well as the priorities and goals of the organization's development teams.

    This all sounds obvious, but in many organizations, silos almost completely block the inter-team communication needed to understand each other's priorities. Even in large organizations that pat themselves on the back for having gone full DevOps (or aspire to go full DevOps), knowledge of the priorities and goals of other teams is not ubiquitous. When I asked the couple hundred people in my audience whether they knew their development teams and what drives those teams, very few hands came up.

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Older Broadwell Graphics Performance Is Looking Good With The New Intel Gallium3D OpenGL Linux Driver

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