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SUSE

openSUSE Jump will likely land in openSUSE Leap 15.3

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SUSE

During the openSUSE + LibreOffice Virtual Conference, there were 2 presentations on what’s next for openSUSE Leap. These presentations also touched on Closing the Leap Gap. This is a project which tries to resolve / minimize the differences in packages between openSUSE Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE), by unifying the code base and the development process. More details on this project can be found here.

On the 20th October, there was a Go-No Go decision to be made. This decision is documented here. The outcome is also described in the Engineering Meeting Minutes that can be found here. There was a Conditional No Go given on the proposal to create an in-between release called openSUSE Leap 15.2.1. That means that the Jump and Leap unification will most likely happen in Leap 15.3. I think that this is a reasonable decision, which provides a better timeline for the openSUSE and SUSE teams to work out all of the outstanding issues.

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SUSE/OpenSUSE YaST, Tumbleweed and USE Linux Enterprise Server 15 SP2 (Desktop Mode)

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SUSE

Modern Computer in a Commodore 64 Shell

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OS
Hardware
SUSE

This Commodore 64 retro computer case plus openSUSE Linux with a little mix of DIY is a perfect mixture of Linux and vintage tech enthusiasm with a dash of my almost unhealthy obsession of openSUSE Linux. It just all comes together here.

I have often heard from some people that standards aren’t fun or standards restrict too much. I think this idea is rather absurd as it is the “restriction” of standards that give us the framework to support the freedom to create new and interesting things. Everything from this “Modern” Commodore 64 case to house standard components is cost effective because of the standard interfaces. I think we can see evidence of this everywhere. This can be everything from programming languages to graphical widget toolkits. Not to say that standards need to be static but having a solid foundation from which to build allows for wonderful and interesting creations. The Commodore 64 Retro Case is just one example of it.

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Thunderbird, grep, systemd Update in Tumbleweed

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SUSE

Systemd 246.6, grep 3.5 and Mozilla Thunderbird 78.3.1 became available in openSUSE Tumbleweed this week.

Four snapshots have been released so far this month.

The most recent snapshot, 20201007, brought a new version update of the general purpose parser bison 3.7.2, which fixed all known Bison Common Vulnerabilities and Exposure related to the bison program itself, but not the generated code. The GNU C Library, glibc, 2.32 corrected the locking and cancellation cleanup in syslog functions; the update also deprecated the header and removed the sysctl function. The snapshot was released a couple of hours ago and started trending at a stable rating of 96, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Email client Alpine was the only other package besides the several RubyGem packages there were updated in snapshot 20201005. The alpine 2.23.2 version added a shortcut to broaden or narrow searches and also expanded the configuration screen for XOAUTH2 so it can include the username and tenant. Many of the action/active packages of RubyGem updated from version 5.2.4.2 to 5.2.4.4, which fixed multiple CVEs. The 0.7.0.1 version of rubygem-bundler-audit fixed an issue with Bundler parsing. Some enhancements were made in the update of rubygem-fluentd from version 1.10.3 to version 1.11.2; the package also refactored the of code in it’s latest release. There were two major RubyGem packages updated in the snapshot. One of those was the Sept. 17 release of rubygem-puma 5.0.0; the package provides new experimental commands and options as well as allowing compiling without OpenSSL and dynamically loading files needed for SSL, add ‘no ssl’ Continuous Integration. The other major update was rubygem-vagrant_cloud 3.0.0. The snapshot is trending stable at a 91 rating.

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Tumbleweed Gets New KDE Frameworks, systemd

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SUSE

KDE Frameworks 5.74.0 and systemd 246.4 became available in openSUSE Tumbleweed after two respective snapshots were released this week.

Hypervisor Xen, libstorage-ng, which is a C++ library used by YaST, and text editor vim were also some of the packages update this week in Tumbleweed.

The most recent snapshot released is 20200919. KDE Frameworks 5.74.0 was released earlier this month and its packages made it into this snapshot. KConfig introduced a method to query the KConfigSkeletonItem default value. KContacts now checks the length of the full name of an email address before trimming it with an address parser. KDE’s lightweight UI framework for mobile and convergent applications, Kirigami, made OverlaySheet of headers and footers use appropriate background colors, updated the app template and introduced a ToolBarLayout native object. Several other 5.74.0 Framework packages were update like Plasma Framework, KTestEditor and KIO. Bluetooth protocol bluez 5.55 fixed several handling issues related to the Audio/Video Remote Control Profile and the Generic Attribute Profile. A reverted Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures patch that was recommended by upstream in cpio 2.13 was once again added. GObject wrapper libgusb 0.3.5 fixed version scripts to be more portable. Documentation was fixed and translations were made for Finnish, Hindi and Russian in the 4.3.42 libstorage-ng update. YaST2 4.3.27 made a change to hide the heading of the dialog when no title is defined or the title is set to an empty string. Xen’s minor updated reverted a previous libexec change for a qemu compatibility wrapper; the path used exists in domU.xml files in the emulator field. The snapshot is trending stable at a 99 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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Feature Requests, Submit Requests for openSUSE Jump Take Shape

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SUSE

The openSUSE Project is progressing with the state of openSUSE Jump, which is the interim name given to the experimental distribution in the Open Build Service.

openSUSE Leap Release Manager Lubos Kocman sent an email to the project titled “Update on Jump and Leap 15.3 and proposed roadmap for the next steps” that explains the progress that has been made with Jump 15.2.1.

“We have some exciting news to share about the openSUSE Jump effort!” Kocman wrote. “We will have a Jira partner setup (coming) for openSUSE this week!”

Access to Jira will allow openSUSE Leap contributors to see updates on community feature requests and be able to comment on requested information or allow them to request information. The process will be tested initially by one of the community members to see if it works properly.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed vs. Leap 15.2 vs. Jump Alpha Benchmarks

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SUSE

Following the recent alpha debut of the openSUSE Jump distribution for testing that is working to synchronize SUSE Linux Enterprise with openSUSE Leap, there was an inquiry made about the performance of it. So for addressing that premium member's question, here are some benchmarks carried out recently of the latest openSUSE Leap 15.2 against the openSUSE Jump in its early state against the rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed.

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SUSE/OpenSUSE: OpenSUSE + LibreOffice Conference, ZeroLogon, YaST and More

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SUSE
  • Conference organizers announce schedule and platform registration

    Organizers of the online openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference are pleased to announce that the schedule for the conference is published.

    All times on the schedule are published in Coordinated Universal Time. The conference will take place from live Oct. 15 to Oct. 17 using the oslo.gonogo.live platform.

    There are more than 100 talks scheduled, covering the openSUSE and LibreOffice projects. There are talks about open-source projects, cloud and container technologies, embedded devices, community development, translations, marketing, documentation, Future Technologies, Quality Assurance and more.

  • SUSE Addresses “ZeroLogon” Vulnerability

    On September 11, Secura research published a new software vulnerability called “ZeroLogon”, which exploits a protocol weakness in the SMB Netlogon protocol. This vulnerability may affect users of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server running Samba servers in older or non-standard configurations. Attackers could use it to bypass access control to the domain controller.

  • Digest of YaST Development Sprint 108

    In our previous post we reported we were working in some mid-term goals in the areas of AutoYaST and storage management. This time we have more news to share about both, together with some other small YaST improvements.

  • Johann Els on running SUSE Linux Enterprise Server on SAP

Tumbleweed Snapshots bring updated Inkscape, Node.js, KDE Applications

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SUSE

Four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released since the last article.

KDE’s Applications 20.08.1, Node.js, iproute2 and inkscape were updated in the snapshots throughout the week.

The 20200915 snapshot is trending stable at a rating of 97, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer. Many YaST packages were updated in this snapshot. The 4.3.19 yast2-network package forces a read of the current virtualization network configuration in case it’s not present. The Chinese pinyin character input package libpinyin updated to 2.4.91, which improved auto correction.

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IBM and SUSE/OpenSUSE

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • IBM Z and Linux Innovation: 20 Years and Counting

    IBM was ahead of its time in relationship to the upstart Linux operating system in the mid-1990s. Twenty years later and a huge amount of innovation later, IBM and the open source system are partners in thousands of systems globally.

  • OpenPOWER Foundation Introduces IBM Hardware and Software Contributions at OpenPOWER Summit 2020

    A2O POWER processor core, an out-of-order follow-up to the A2I core, and associated FPGA environment

  • Conference Organizers Announce Schedule, Platform Registration

    Organizers of the openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference are pleased to announce the schedule for the conference is published.  

    All times on the schedule are published in Coordinated Universal Time. The conference will take place live Oct. 15 through Oct. 17 using the https://oslo.gonogo.live/ platform.

    There are more than 100 talks scheduled that range from talks about the openSUSE and LibreOffice projects to talks about documentation. There are talks about open-source projects, cloud and container technologies, embedded devices, community development, translations, marketing, future technologies, quality assurance and more. 

    There will be multiple sessions happening at the same time, so some talks might overlap. Attendees have an option to personalize a schedule so that they are reminded when the live talk they would like to see begins. 

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  • openSUSE Projects Support Hacktoberfest Efforts

    The openSUSE community is ready for Hacktoberfest, which is run by Digital Ocean and DEV that encourages people to make their first contributions to open source projects. The openSUSE + LibreOffice Virtual Conference will take place during Hacktoberfest and is listed as an event on the website. The conference will have more than 100 talks about open source projects ranging from documentation to the technologies within each project.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora 33 To Be Released Next Week

Fedora 33 will manage to ship on-time per its back-up target date of next week Tuesday. While Fedora 33 wasn't ready to ship this Tuesday per its "preferred" target date, Fedora 33 has been cleared by to ship next week on its "Final Target date #1" for this major update to the Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to Use Sudo Command in Linux? – Linux Hint

    Among the different concepts of an operating system, the most crucial one is access control, which specifies the level of access that is granted to each user of that operating system. The access control policies ensure that no user is allowed to perform those activities for which he has not been granted any privileges. The two most common types of users in any operating system are the root user (has administrative level privileges) and the guest user (only has a limited set of privileges).

  • Settings to Try with Firefox

    There are various stories about Firefox not respecting user privacy. Some suggest certain settings to reduce the information Firefox sends out (such as this one from Mozilla). Over time, I have collected a lot of them into a user.js file. For those who do not know, a user.js file may be dropped into a Firefox profile directory as a convenient way to force certain settings every time Firefox starts up. This can reset changes made by the user during a previous session, but is also a convenient way to initialize desired settings in a fresh profile.

    In an IRC discussion, Martyb suggested I share the settings I have collected. Below is a sample user.js that I sometimes use as a template for disabling many potential privacy and/or security holes in Firefox. Some, like HTML pings, are probably features that most privacy-minded individuals do not want (and may not have even known about). Others, like disabling cookies and/or javascript, can break how sites work (sometimes, amusingly, they only break the advertisements). Others, like disabling tracker protection, are double-edged in that disabling them exposes you to being tracked by known trackers, while enabling them might cause Firefox to phone home to get updated lists of known trackers. The comments in the user.js point out some, but definitely not all, of the potential pitfalls. The settings are definitely not set the way everybody should use them, but having them listed out at least provides a convenient starting point. I highly recommend against dropping them directly into your main Firefox profile, as they may undo changes you have made for yourself. Instead, either try them in a fresh profile and copy over things that work for you, or research the settings and only copy over the ones you want that will not break your browser.

  • How To check LXD container BTRFS disk usage on Linux

    Find LXD container disk size and how much space they are using when storage back end set to BTRFS.

  • How to Install Perl Modules on Debian Linux? – Linux Hint

    Perl is a very popular high-level programming language. It is a scripting language, in fact, whose syntax resembles closely with C and C++. A Perl module is defined as a collection of related functions. It is very much similar to the concept of libraries is C++ and Java. This means that if you intend to run a function in Perl, you must have the respective module for that function installed on your system. That is why in this article, we will be learning the method of installing Perl modules on Debian 10.

  • How to Format a Drive in Linux – Linux Hint

    Formatting a drive is necessary whenever you are trying to erase data on a drive or partition or to create a new partition. Before formatting a partition or drive, it is strongly recommended to make sure that there is nothing important there, as formatting may erase the data for good.

  • How to Install and Configure OpenVPN Server in CentOS 8/7

    In this article, we will explain how to set up a VPN server using OpenVPN with two remote clients (a Linux box and a Windows machine) on an RHEL/CentOS 8/7 box.

  • How to set up a Kubernetes cluster in Ubuntu 20.04 > Tux-Techie

    In this tutorial, we are going to set up a Kubernetes cluster with two Ubuntu 20.04 servers. Learn how to set up for master and worker nodes.

  • How to find Linux distribution name and Version? – Linux Hint

    While you are working on new Linux distribution, you might not know which Linux version is installed on your system. Sometimes, you need to meet a few system requirements while running an application on your system. However, different ways are available to check the Version of installed Linux distribution. Linux Mint 20 is the most growing Linux distribution and has a number of available graphical user interfaces that may vary from one user to the other. Hence, each user may also have a different running procedure. For this purpose, the recommended solution is to access and open the terminal command-line application.

  • How To Safely Remove PPA Repositories in Ubuntu – Linux Hint

    PPA is popularly known as Personal Package Archives, it provide Ubuntu users to get new and updated software regularly. Some are officials and provided by Ubuntu developers.

  • How to Change or Reset Root Password in Linux – Linux Hint

    If you have not logged in as a root user for a long time and have not saved the login information anywhere, there is a chance that you may lose access to the credentials for your system. It is not an unusual occurrence, but rather, a common issue, which most Linux users have probably encountered before. If this happens, you can easily change or reset the password via the command-line or the GUI (Graphical User Interface). But what do you do if the root password must be modified or reset? This article shows you how to change the root password for your Linux Mint 20 system via three different methods.

  • Use mobile numbers for user authentication in Keycloak - Red Hat Developer

    Use Keycloak's authentication service provider interface to develop a custom MobileAuthenticator class that you can run in your JBoss EAP container.

  • How to List All Users in a Linux System – Linux Hint

    At any given time, multiple users can operate a single computer system. However, with such shared systems, a system administrator must take the proper security measures so that one user cannot breach the privacy of another by, for example, applying an access control mechanism that specifies the privileges of each user. At times, a change in user privileges might be necessary. For example, a user might need his or her privileges extended for a certain task, or a ability of a certain user to access the system may have to be revoked entirely. In such scenarios, it is important for the system administrator to have complete knowledge of all users of the system. In this article, we explore the methods used to list the users of a Linux system. Both graphical user interface (GUI)-based methods and command line interface (CLI)-based methods can be used for this task; however, this article focuses on four terminal-based methods.

  • iSH Shell app lets you locally run a Linux shell environment on iPhone and iPad - 9to5Mac

    If you always wanted to have a fully functional Terminal on your iPhone or iPad, now you can. Today the new iSH Shell app was officially released on the App Store to let iOS users locally interact with a Linux shell environment. The iSH project started a few months ago with a beta app, but now the developer was able to release it on the App Store for everyone. iSH Shell runs on usermode x86 emulation, and it uses syscall translation so it can run locally on iOS.

  • How to Merge PDF Files on the Command Line? – Linux Hint

    PDF is the most frequently used file format all over the world. This file format is not only used for personal documents but also for professional documents. At times, you might have multiple inter-related PDF files, and you wish to integrate them all as a single PDF file. Therefore, today we will be explaining to you the different methods of merging PDF files on the command line.

  • Making Docker Work in Your Computer Infrastructure | Mind Matters

    By itself, Docker makes great use of filesystem space. Because each container only holds the changes from the images, a little bit of image bloat doesn’t directly impact the server adversely. However, this doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t worry about bloat at all. Not only should we not waste space without reason, images that are too big cause other problems that you need to be aware of. The most important consideration is attack surface. Every program that you have on your image is a potential hole for a hacker to exploit. Keeping unneeded software off of your container is the easiest first step to maintaining secure containers. However, in more general terms, everything on your container will wind up needing maintenance at some point. The more software you have installed, the more maintenance you will be subject to. You might think, “If I don’t use it, how does it cause maintenance issues?” Well, most software is written by a software team, not just a single individual. I have noticed that, if something is available to use, some member of the team will eventually find an excuse to use it. So, the more software that you leave on your container, the more tools your team will eventually make use of. Additionally, those team members may not even remember to document which operating system tools they are using. Therefore, it is best to start off with the most minimal set of tools you can, and then only add when absolutely necessary. Then your team will think twice before adding something, and— more importantly—it will be added explicitly to your Dockerfile, which makes it easier to spot.

  • What is LVM (Logical Volume Management), and what are its Benefits? – Linux Hint

    Logical Volume Management or LVM is a framework of the Linux operating system that has been introduced for the easier management of physical storage devices. The concept of logical volume management is very much similar to the concept of virtualization, i.e. you can create as many virtual storage volumes on top of a single storage device as you want. The logical storage volumes thus created can be expanded or shrunk according to your growing or reducing storage needs.

  • How to Search for Files on Linux from the Command Line? – Linux Hint

    In any computer system, you have got tons of different files. Some of them are system files that are there since the very beginning, whereas some of them are user files that you create on your own as per your needs. However, when there is a large bulk of files, and you only wish to search for a particular file or set of files for any specific task, then the process of looking for that file or files manually can be extremely tedious as you have to go to each and every directory in search of that file or files that you need. And even then, it is not assured that you will be effectively able to find all those files. Thankfully, our operating systems these days are efficient enough that they present us with different ways in which we can automate this task and make it more speedy. Like other operating systems, Linux also enables us to search for files automatically via terminal commands. Therefore, today, our discussion will revolve around exploring the different methods of searching for files on Linux from the command line.

New open source project crowdsources internet security

CrowdSec is a new security project designed to protect servers, services, containers, or virtual machines exposed on the internet with a server-side agent. It was inspired by Fail2Ban and aims to be a modernized, collaborative version of that intrusion-prevention framework. CrowdSec is free and open source (under an MIT License), with the source code available on GitHub. It is currently is available for Linux, with ports to macOS and Windows on the roadmap. Read more

KDE Neon vs Kubuntu: What’s the Difference Between the Two KDE Distribution?

I know it is often confusing especially if you have never used either of them but got them as recommendations for usage. Hence, to help you make a decision, I thought of compiling a list of differences (and similarities) between KDE Neon and Kubuntu. Let’s start with getting to know the similarities and then proceed with the differences. Read more