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SUSE

Release Team to have retrospective meeting about openSUSE Leap 15.2

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SUSE

Members of the openSUSE community will have two retrospective meeting on the release of openSUSE Leap 15.2 after receiving feedback from the recent survey.

The meetings are scheduled for tomorrow, Thursday, at 06:00 - 08:00 UTC and 15:00 - 17:00 UTC.

Release Manager Luboš Kocman provided a short summary about the feedback received and information about the meeting in an email this week to the project.

“Thanks to everyone who participated in our openSUSE Leap 15.2 release retrospective that took place on survey.opensuse.org,” Kocman wrote. “The survey was fully anonymous and questions were: What went well and What didn’t go too well.

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Also: SUSE Documentation Survey 2020 – Second Take. Your Call to Action to Help Us Improve.

OpenSUSE: Election Campaign and Leap 15.2 Install Party

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SUSE

  • Stasiek Michalski answers Richard Brown's questions as the openSUSE election campaign progresses

    Community members are welcome to ask the candidates questions about their views on the project and to comment on some of the pertinent matters within the community. Richard Brown, former Chairman of openSUSE, put a few questions to Stasiek Michalski about his views on conflict resolution, the board structure and the project's key sponsor SUSE.

    Stasiek expressed his views as he answered Richard on the project mailing list.

  • Leap 15.2 Install party @ GOLEM - A quick report

    Ah, the event was also recorded, but they still have to let me know whether that worked well or not.

    I decided to do a live install as I think our installer is great, and wanted to show it off a bit. Smile In fact, I’ve heard a few times people saying that installing openSUSE is difficult, and I wanted to give it a shot to busting that myth.

    I showed how it is possible to install the distro with just a few clicks, which is the opposite of difficult. After that, I went back and explained all the various possible customizations that one can make – but only if she wants to– at each stage.

    Feedback on this was extremely good, and I think I’m going to reuse this same approach for other similar occasions.

    While the installer was copying packages, there was the time to talk a bit about the characteristics of Leap such as its goals, release cycle, development process, relationship with SLE, etc.

    I quickly mentioned the maintenance process, taking advantage of some slides kindly provided by Marina (thanks to you again as well!), and this also was perceived as very interesting.

    After the system was ready, I had the time to showcase YaST a little, to explain how to add Packman repos for the codecs and to introduce BTRFS snapshots, snapper and demo a reboot into a previous snapshot and the rollback.

SUSE/OpenSUSE Leftovers

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SUSE

openSUSE 15.2 Is The Mercedes-Benz of Linux Distributions

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Reviews
SUSE

The openSUSE DVD comes with a large collection of software packages, which include the GNOME, KDE, Xfce, MATE desktops and much more. The installer will allow you to select the desktop environment you want during the installation, beside any other packages you may desire.

[...]

Overall, the openSUSE 15.2 distribution is a good release, as it ever was. We recommend upgrading to the new version or installing it on a fresh hardware if you are willing to transfer to the openSUSE world.

One can also give a word about how awesome the available documentation for openSUSE is; You can search in their wiki, for any information you desire and you’ll probably find it in no time.

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New GeckoLinux Rolling Editions Are Out Now, Based on openSUSE Tumbleweed

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Linux
SUSE

After announcing the latest versions of the GeckoLinux Static and GeckoLinux NEXT KDE Plasma editions, the developer also refreshed the GeckoLinux Rolling editions, which are based on the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system.

Therefore, as you an imagine these new GeckoLinux Rolling editions are the most up-to-date ISO releases of the openSUSE-based distribution. GeckoLinux Rolling is available in seven variants with the KDE Plasma 5.19, GNOME 3.36, Xfce 4.14, Cinnamon 4.4, MATE 1.24, and LXQt 0.15 desktop environments, as well as BareBones flavor with the IceWM window manager.

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GeckoLinux ROLLING 999.200729 released

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OS
Linux
News
SUSE

GeckoLinux is pleased to announce the 999.200729 update to its ROLLING editions, thus completing the current refresh cycle of the entire GeckoLinux lineup. GeckoLinux ROLLING spins are generated directly from unmodified openSUSE Tumbleweed and Packman repositories, and the installed system can be updated directly from those official sources. This design decision has allowed GeckoLinux ROLLING users to install and update their systems in a constant rolling fashion over the past two years from the cutting edge and highly stable openSUSE Tumbleweed distribution. Now, GeckoLinux users that need an installation ISO to support very new hardware will find what they need in the GeckoLinux ROLLING 999.200729 set of updated spins.

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10 Years of OpenStack – Alan Clark at SUSE

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OSS
SUSE

Happy 10 years of OpenStack! Millions of cores, 100,000 community members, 10 years of you.

Storytelling is one of the most powerful means to influence, teach, and inspire the people around us. To celebrate OpenStack’s 10th anniversary, we are spotlighting stories from the individuals in various roles from the community who have helped to make OpenStack and the global Open Infrastructure community successful.

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GeckoLinux NEXT Plasma 152.200726 update

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OS
KDE
Linux
News
SUSE

Hi everyone, I'm pleased to announce another update to the GeckoLinux NEXT Plasma edition. The purpose of this edition is not to replace the regular GeckoLinux STATIC Plasma release, but rather as an alternative for those who want the latest Plasma and KDE packages on top of a stable openSUSE Leap base. This is achieved thanks to some additional openSUSE OBS repositories, together with the polished GeckoLinux configuration for the Plasma desktop.

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SUSE/OpenSUSE: Tumbleweed, SUSE Training Credits, Containers

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SUSE

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/30

    Due to a packaging change in a low-level package (krb5), I decided to trigger a full rebuild of openSUSE:Factory. Quite a lot of packages reference krb5-config to find the correct locations, but I could not get a conclusive list. The risk of not doing a full rebuild and having all packages follow the changes of krb5 could lead to devastating results, which I did not want to risk. This in turn meant OBS was busy for a bit longer and we only released two snapshots (0717 and 0720). The next one to be published (0721) will be the one with the full rebuild.

  • SUSE Introduces Training Credits to Help Enterprises Thrive Today and in the Future

    Now, SUSE is making it easier for enterprise customers to ensure their IT staff have the know-how they need to help their businesses thrive today and in the future. With the addition of SUSE Training Credits, customers can buy prepaid credits that can be redeemed for public or private instructor-led training and certification exam vouchers.

  • Setup secure private Docker registry in SUSE Linux Enterprise server 15Sp2

    Containerized application delivery has become the latest trend in today’s IT environment. These container images are distributed by respective Organizations/Communities through their official Docker container registries hosted online. Docker container registries are applications that manages storing and delivering of container images.

    Container images can be pulled from any online registry you can access to ,and you will also able to push your images to online registries. These online registries are public (unless you pay for online space ) and can be accessed by anyone else . It is important to setup an offline / private docker registry so that images can be securely stored offline. A private Docker registry allows you to share your custom images within your organization, keeping a consistent, private, and centralized source of building blocks of your architecture. A private Docker registry gives you better performances for big clusters and high-frequency roll-outs, plus added features like access authentication.

Events: DebianDay, GUADEC 2020 and OpenSUSE + LibreOffice

Filed under
GNOME
Debian
SUSE
  • Let's celebrate DebianDay 2020 around the world

    We encourage our community to celebrate around the world the 27th Debian anniversary with organized [DebianDay][1] events. This year due to the COVID-19 pandemic we cannot organize in-person events, so we ask instead that contributors, developers, teams, groups, maintainers, and users promote The Debian Project and Debian activities online on August 16th (and/or 15th).

    Communities can organize a full schedule of online activities throughout the day. These activities can include talks, workshops, active participation with contributions such as translations assistance or editing, debates, BoFs, and all of this in your local language using tools such as [Jitsi][2] for capturing audio and video from presenters for later streaming to YouTube.

    If you are not aware of any local community organizing a full event or you don't want to join one, you can solo design your own activity using [OBS][3] and stream it to YouTube. You can watch an OBS tutorial [here][4].

    Don't forget to record your activity as it will be a nice idea to upload it to [Peertube][5] later.

  • GUADEC 2020 Kicks Off Today as GNOME’s First Virtual Conference

    The GUADEC 2020 (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) event kicks off today until July 28th as GNOME’s first online conference in the coronavirus era.

    The time has come for the summer Linux conferences to open their doors to virtual visitors, and GUDEC 2020 is the first major Linux conference to switch to an online format. The event was supposed to take place in Zacatecas, Mexico, but as you can imagine, everyone is adapting every day to respond to the needs created by the COVID-19 crisis, which affects us all.

    GUADEC 2020 is the place where GNOME users and developers from all over the world gather together to share knowledge and discuss upcoming features of the next major release of the GNOME desktop environment, which is used by numerous Linux-based operating systems, including Ubuntu, Debian, openSUSE, Fedora, and many others.

  • openSUSE + LibreOffice Virtual Conference Extends Call for Papers

    Organizers of the openSUSE + LibreOffice Virtual Conference are extending the Call for Papers to August 4.

    Participants can submit talks for the live conference past the original deadline of July 21 for the next two weeks.

    The conference is scheduled to take place online from Oct. 15. - 17.

    The length of the talks that can be submitted are either a 15-minute short talk, a 30-minute normal talk and/or a 60-minute work group session. Organizers believe shortening the talks will keep attendees engaged for the duration of the online conference.

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today's howtos and leftovers

  • Linux commands for user management
  • CONSOOM All Your PODCASTS From Your Terminal With Castero
  • Install Blender 3D on Debian 10 (Buster)
  • Things To Do After Installing openSUSE Leap 15.2
  • GSoC Reports: Fuzzing Rumpkernel Syscalls, Part 2

    I have been working on Fuzzing Rumpkernel Syscalls. This blogpost details the work I have done during my second coding period.

  • Holger Levsen: DebConf7

    DebConf7 was also special because it had a very special night venue, which was in an ex-church in a rather normal building, operated as sort of community center or some such, while the old church interior was still very much visible as in everything new was build around the old stuff. And while the night venue was cool, it also ment we (video team) had no access to our machines over night (or for much of the evening), because we had to leave the university over night and the networking situation didn't allow remote access with the bandwidth needed to do anything video. The night venue had some very simple house rules, like don't rearrange stuff, don't break stuff, don't fix stuff and just a few little more and of course we broke them in the best possible way: Toresbe with the help of people I don't remember fixed the organ, which was broken for decades. And so the house sounded in some very nice new old tune and I think everybody was happy we broke that rule.