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SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

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Reviews
SUSE

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu.

I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want.

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Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Huawei and SUSE Announce SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Support for KunLun RAS 2.0

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SUSE
  • Huawei and SUSE Announce SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Support for KunLun RAS 2.0

    Huawei and SUSE have announced SUSE Linux Enterprise Server as the preferred standard operating system (OS) for Huawei’s KunLun RAS 2.0. Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack 2, the OS supports the unique Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability (RAS 2.0) features of Huawei’s KunLun Mission Critical Server.

    The RAS 2.0 features enable customers to add or remove CPU and memory resources without shutting down the system. These features combine to make KunLun ‘Always Online’. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server provides broad support for mission-critical workloads such as databases and middleware.

  • Huawei and SUSE Announce SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Support for KunLun RAS 2.0

    Huawei and SUSE today announced SUSE Linux Enterprise Server as the preferred standard operating system (OS) for Huawei's KunLun RAS 2.0. Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack 2, the OS supports the unique Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability (RAS 2.0) features of Huawei's KunLun Mission Critical Server. The RAS 2.0 features enable customers to add or remove CPU and memory resources without shutting down the system. These features combine to make KunLun "Always Online." SUSE Linux Enterprise Server provides broad support for mission-critical workloads such as databases and middleware.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Linux Kernel 4.10.3, GNOME 3.24 Coming Soon

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SUSE

Dominique Leuenberger from the openSUSE Project is informing the Tumbleweed community about the latest updates brought by a total of five snapshots during the week that passed.

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SUSE acquires HPE's cloud assets

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SUSE

HPE and SUSE, a top Linux distributor, have a complex relationship. First, HPE spun and merged its non-core software assets with Micro Focus. Micro Focus owns SUSE, a major Linux provider. Now, SUSE has finished acquiring cloud assets of HPE's OpenStack Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS), Cloud Foundry Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS), and Stackato, HPE's Cloud Foundry implementation.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Rolling to Leap 42.3

    The bits and pieces needed for a rolling development phase of Leap 42.3 are now up and running!

  • OpenSUSE Leap 42.3 Will Be Developed In A Rolling Manner

    Ubuntu dropped their official alpha/betas long ago, Fedora 27 is dropping their alphas, and openSUSE is also shifting their development approach and will get rid of alpha and beta releases. OpenSUSE Leap 42.3 will be developed in a "rolling" manner although the release will not be a rolling-release post-release, unlike openSUSE Tumbleweed.

  • YaST development during Hack Week 15

    During this Hack Week, some of our team members invested quite some time working in YaST related projects. But, what’s even better, some people from outside the team worked also in YaST projects. Thank you guys!

openSUSE.Asia Summit and openSUSE Tumbleweed

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SUSE
  • Committee Accepting Proposals for openSUSE.Asia Summit

    The openSUSE.Asia organization committee is accepting proposals to host the openSUSE.Asia Summit during the second half of 2017. The openSUSE.Asia Summit is the largest annual openSUSE conference in Asia and is attended by contributors and enthusiasts from all over Asia.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.10, Users Get Mesa 17

    Good news for users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system, as openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio informed the community about the latest updates that landed in the repositories in the last week of February 2017.

    It would appear that only four snapshots were released for openSUSE Tumbleweed users last week, but they brought a bunch of goodies that many will adore, starting with the recently released Linux 4.10.1 kernel. openSUSE Tumbleweed is also proudly powered by the newest Mesa 17.0 3D Graphics Library, for a better gaming experience.

Tumbleweed Gets Kernel 4.10.1, Mesa 17, Python 3.6

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SUSE

The joy and experimentation of Hack Week didn’t keep openSUSE Tumbleweed from continuing to roll.

Since the last news article on Tumbleweed two weeks ago, there have been eight snapshots featuring new software packages.

The most recent snapshot to land in the repositories was snapshot 20170228, which provided less than a handful of packages.

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Also: OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Now Running On Linux 4.10, Updated Flatpak & More

Events: g2k16 Hackathon, SUSE Hackweek, LinuxFest Northwest 2017

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OSS
SUSE
  • g2k16 Hackathon Report: Matthieu Herrb on xenodm

    I started the hackathon by upgrading a number of packages in Xenocara. The most noteworthy being the XCB (X protocol C-language Bindings) suite updated to the most recent 1.12 version.

  • Hackweek projet: Let's Encrypt DNS-01 validation for acme.sh with Gandi LiveDNS

    Last week was SUSE Hackweek and one of my projects was to get Let's Encrypt configured and working on my NAS.

    Let's Encrypt is a project aimed at providing SSL certificates for free, in an automated way.

  • openSUSE at LinuxFest Northwest 2017

    LinuxFest Northwest 2017, coming up the first weekend in May, promises to continue its tradition of providing a unique, active, fun experience for open-source enthusiasts at all experience levels. openSUSE continues its long-term sponsorship of the event, and we are looking forward to having a lot of fun! Submit your session proposals by March 1, 2017!

    LinuxFest Northwest, if you’re not familiar, is one of the largest community-centric conferences in the USA, and a free+libre event (no attendance fees and registration is optional) promoting open source, open hardware, and community involvement. Now in its 16th year, with an audience rapidly approaching 2,000 people, the event continues to grow, attract a broader audience, and redefine the experience of a weekend conference. With a Linux Game Den, a Robotics Lab, a Job Fair (new this year), community mini-summits, as well as the expo hall and 8 – 10 parallel tracks of sessions, LFNW is a week of conference stuffed into a weekend.

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • OBS got the power!

    Old build workers, rack mounted

    Old build workers, rack mounted

    One year after introducing a new kind of Open Build Service worker machines, the “lambkins”, the openSUSE Build Service got a big hardware refresh. The new machines, sponsored by SUSE, are equipped with:

    2,8GHz AMD Opteron Processors (6348)
    256 GB RAM
    one 120 GB SSD

    Four of them are located in a chassis with a height of 2 units and run 12-16 workers on them (virtual machines, that are building packages).

    That new build power allowed us to remove some of old machines from the pool. The unified hardware makes the management of the machines a lot easier now, even if there are still the most powerful old machines left.

  • openSUSE Heroes December meeting – final results

    While we had some fun and good food and drinks, we also managed to discuss a lot during the three days in the Nuremberg headquarter. This was needed because this was the first time that the Heroes came together in their current form. In the end, we managed to do no coding and even (nearly) no administration – but instead we started to discuss our (internal and external) policies and work flows – and did some decisions regarding the next steps and the future of the openSUSE infrastructure.

  • New and improved Inqlude web site

    During last year's Summer of Code I had the honor of mentoring Nanduni Indeewaree Nimalsiri. She worked on Inqlude, the comprehensive archive of third party Qt libraries, improving the tooling to create a better structured web site with additional features such as categorization by topic. She did an excellent job with it and all of her code ended up on the master branch. But we hadn't yet made the switch to change the default layout of the web site to fully take advantage of all her work. As part of SUSE's 15th Hack Week, which is taking place this week, I took some time to change that, put up some finishing touches, and switch the Inqlude web site to the new layout. So here we are. I proudly present the new improved home page of Inqlude.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Powered by Linux Kernel 4.9.9 and Mesa 13.0.4, Update Now

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Linux
SUSE

openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio reports today, February 16, about the latest software updates and technologies that landed in the stable repositories during last week and the beginning of this one via a total of six snapshots.

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Red Hat News

Samsung Z4 gets WiFi Certified with Tizen 3.0 onboard, Launching soon

Today, the next Tizen smartphone, which should be the named the Samsung Z4, has received its WiFi certification (certification ID: WFA70348) – Model number SM-Z400F/DS with firmware Z400F.001 on the 2.4Ghz band. WiFi certification is usually one of the last steps before a mobile device gets released and means a launch is coming real soon as we have already seen the Z4 make its debut appearance at the FCC. For the previous model, the Samsung Z2, we saw it get WIFi certified on 7 July and then launched on 23 August, a mere 6 weeks. Read more

Linux 4.10.6

I'm announcing the release of the 4.10.6 kernel. All users of the 4.10 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.10.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.10.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more Also: Linux 4.9.18 Linux 4.4.57

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

  • Mux Controller Subsystem Proposed For Linux 4.12
    A new subsystem has been proposed for staging in the Linux 4.12 kernel. Peter Rosin has requested Greg KH pull in the mux controller subsystem for the Linux 4.12 kernel. He explained of this new subsystem, "This adds a new mux controller subsystem with an interface for accessing mux controllers, along with two drivers providing the interface (gpio and adg792) and two consumers (iio and i2c). This is done in such a way that several consumers can independently access the same mux controller if one controller controls several multiplexers, thus allowing sharing."
  • Marek Looking To Tackle Large RadeonSI Performance Bottleneck
    Prolific Mesa developer Marek Olšák is looking to tackle what he thinks is the "biggest performance bottleneck at the moment" for the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver.
  • Shader Variants Support For Etnaviv Gallium3D