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SUSE

Announcing the SUSE Linux for Raspberry Pi LinkedIn group

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Linux
SUSE

We have supported SUSE Linux on various models of Raspberry Pi systems since 2018. Although we have seen a variety of use cases for SUSE Linux on Raspberry Pi devices, we really did not have a good forum for people to share technical information for using SUSE Linux on the Raspberry Pi.

To address this limitation, I have created a LinkedIn group to foster sharing of technical information about using SUSE Linux on Raspberry Pi and other Single Board Computers (SBC) based on Arm processors. This new group can be found at https://cutt.ly/rpisuse

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Stasiek Michalski wins the race for the openSUSE Board

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SUSE

The openSUSE Ad-hoc Board Election is now concluded.

Stasiek Michalski has been elected to join the openSUSE Board. The complete result is as follows:

Stasiek Michalski — 160 votes
Pierre Böckmann — 70 votes
234 out of 510 eligible members have cast their vote in this election. We recorded 4 blank votes.

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OpenSUSE/Tumbleweed Updates and SUSE 'Cloudwashing'

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SUSE
  • Alpha Prototype Jump is Available, Tumbleweed gets systemd, curl Updates

    The prototype project openSUSE Jump is now available for Alpha phase testing. Jump is an interim name given to the experimental distribution in the Open Build Service as developers have been trying to synchronize SUSE Linux Enterprise binaries for openSUSE Leap. The efforts are trying to bring the codes of Leap and SLE closer together, which was previously mentioned in an article titled New Prototype Builds Bringing Leap, SLE Closer Will be Available Soon.

    The past week produced three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots.

    The snapshots brought some interesting packages including one used by NASA and one package fixed a ancient bug. A full rebuild of Tumbleweed was done with Build20200825, but the build doesn’t appear good enough to be released in a snapshot.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/35

    This week we have published a few snapshots less than normal. To ‘compensate’, the next one will be huge to download though. On August 25, I merged the change for libexecdir == /usr/libexec and since then I’m fighting to QA after effects to get you a snapshot out that won’t break in all corners. There will likely be some rough patches here and there though.

  • Live Patching And SUSE Lifecycle Manager On SLES For SAP On-Demand In The Public Cloud
  • Adapting for Hybrid Cloud – Part 1 of 3: The Market

SUSE: Kubernetes 1.19.0 and SUSE Digital Partner Summit

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SUSE

  • What’s new in Kubernetes 1.19

    Thanks to Sascha Grunert for the technical content of this post. In addition to being a member of the Containers Squad of the SUSE CaaS Platform team, Sascha is Technical Lead in the Kubernetes Release Engineering Subproject, which is part of SIG Release. He participated in many Kubernetes release cycles from different roles and is thrilled to give you an update about the next version.
    SUSE congratulates the Kubernetes Project on another evolution of the most popular container orchestration and management platform, which forms the basis of our SUSE CaaS Platform. You can expect to see Kubernetes 1.19 supported in a future SUSE release.

    [...]

    Two Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) will be fixed in Kubernetes v1.19.0.
    The first one is CVE-2020-8559, which allows a privilege escalation from a node inside the cluster. This means if it is possible to intercept certain requests to the Kubelet, then an attacker could send a redirect response that may be followed by a client request using the credentials from the original request. This can lead to compromise of other nodes inside the cluster.

    The other fixed vulnerability is CVE-2020-8557. This CVE allows a Denial of Service (DoS) via a mounted /etc/hosts file inside a container. If a container writes a huge set of data to the /etc/hosts file, then it could fill the storage space of the node and cause the node to fail. Root cause for this issue was that the kubelet does not evict this part of the ephemeral storage.

  •        

  • SUSE plots edgier Kubernetes with Linux behind the wheel

    SUSE has had a busy year, with a switch of CEO, the ditching of OpenStack, and the buy of Kubernetes darling Rancher Labs.

    The Register spoke to the veteran Linux flinger's president of Engineering and Innovation, Thomas Di Giacomo, and CTO and openSUSE chair Gerald Pfeifer, about cars, Kubernetes, open source and life free from the clutches of its previous owner.

    Last month's Rancher Labs slurp highlighted the freedom SUSE now enjoys after it was jettisoned from Micro Focus in 2018.

  • The Dog days of Summer means we are that much closer to SUSE Digital Partner Summit

    Two weeks – we’ll be firmly in September with kids in some form of school AND the SUSE Digital Partner Summit beginning its first day (hint: register!). As mentioned in an earlier post day, 1 features a keynote from Melissa Di Donato and Paul Devlin and the announcement of the SUSE One Partner Program and why the program is evolving to the specializations of INNOVATE, BUILD, SELL, MANAGE, SERVICE and TRAIN to be covered by Rachel Cassidy. Rachel will be joined by Julie Baldwin as they discuss how one of our partners have found ways to stay relevant in a cloud-first world.

Tumbleweed Snapshots bring Kernel 5.8, Hypervisor FS Support with Xen Update

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SUSE

This week openSUSE Tumbleweed delivered four snapshots that brought in a new mainline kernel for the distribution as well as a package for Xen that removes previous requirements of parsing log data or writing custom hypercalls to transport the data, and custom code to read it.

The latest snapshot, 20200810, brought the 5.8.0 Linux Kernel that had a fix for missing check in vgacon scrollback handling and an additional commit from the previous version improves load balancing for SO_REUSEPORT, which can be used for both TCP and UDP sockets. The GNU Compiler Collection 10 update includes some Straight Line Speculation mitigation changes. GNOME had a few package updates in the snapshot with updates to accerciser 3.36.3, web browser epiphany 3.36.4 and GNOME games gnome-mines 3.36.1 and quadrapassel 3.36.04. The snapshot is trending at a rating of 84, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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SUSE: OBS, 'Cloud' and Chat With Linux Kernel Developer at SUSE

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SUSE
  • OBS NDI™ Plugin on openSUSE

    The NDI plugin offers a fairly easy way to send OBS video signal (presumably other applications can take advantage of this too) to another OBS instance on another machine. This can come in handy for numerous reasons such as splitting up workloads between machines by capturing output from one machine, such as gaming computer, to stream with a dedicated unit that interfaces with YouTube. This has advantages in that you can move the machine doing the heavy lifting into another room or across the room as to not hear the fans and so forth. In my case, my primary machine is getting long in the tooth. I prefer the setup I have as far as the screen layout and height of the computer as well as the location. I use my AMD Desktop / server / workstation machine to talk to YouTube or Twitch directly with that OBS instance and record locally in effect freeing up my laptop from quite a bit of the workload.

  • Data Explosion – Is the Cloud Your Silver Bullet?
  • Women in Tech: “Aptitude has nothing to do with gender or inborn capabilities”

    Women are underrepresented in the tech sector —myth or reality? Three years ago, we launched a diversity series aimed at bringing the most inspirational and powerful women in the tech scene to your attention. Today, we’d like you to meet Jessica Yu, Linux Kernel Developer at SUSE.
    A research study by The National Center for Women & Information Technology showed that “gender diversity has specific benefits in technology settings,” which could explain why tech companies have started to invest in initiatives that aim to boost the number of female applicants, recruit them in a more effective way, retain them for longer, and give them the opportunity to advance. But is it enough?

    Three years ago, we launched a diversity series aimed at bringing the most inspirational and powerful women in the tech scene to your attention. Today, we’d like you to meet Jessica Yu, Linux Kernel Developer at SUSE.

New Prototype Builds Bringing Leap, SLE Closer Will be Available Soon

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SUSE

The release manager for openSUSE Leap, Lubos Kocman, has updated openSUSE’s develop community on efforts to bring the codes of Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise closer together.

In an email to the openSUSE-Factory mailing list, Kocman explained that the prototype project openSUSE Jump should become available for early testing soon and that contributions to the project could become available in the next five weeks.

“First, I’d like to announce that we’ll start publishing images and FTP trees for openSUSE Jump, so people can get their hands on [it],” Kocman wrote. “Please be aware that Jump is still in Alpha quality. I expect data to be available later this week as there is still pending work on pontifex by Heroes.

The Alpha quality state of Jump is gradually progressing.

Jump is an interim name given to the experimental distribution in the Open Build Service as developers try to synchronize SLE binaries for openSUSE Leap.

Kocman explained how feature requests will work, the process for how contributions will be handled and and he also explained how the submissions will lead to greater transparency.

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SUSE/OpenSUSE: Tumbleweed, YaST and Corporate Stuff

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SUSE
  • Skopeo, xxHash, GCC 10.2 are Among Updates in Tumbleweed

    openSUSE Tumbleweed had continuous daily snapshots with a handful of software package updates this week.

    Many minor-version updates and one major-version update became available to Tumbleweed users and the newest snapshot, 20200804, updated the iso-codes package, which lists country, language and currency names; the new 4.5.0 version updated translations and the subdivision names for Belarus. The Greybird Geeko theme was updated to improve contrast of gtk2 selection background color. The desktop calculator qalculate was updated to version 3.12.0 and improved exact simplification of roots. The fast hash algorithm xxhash 0.8.0 stablized the XXH3. Both libyui-ncurses and ncurses had minor updates. The snapshot is trending stable with a rating of 97, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

  • Digest of YaST Development Sprint 105

    Although a significant part of the YaST Team is enjoying their well deserved summer vacations, the development wheel keeps turning. During the latest two weeks we have fixed quite some bugs in several parts of (Auto)YaST. But listing fixed bugs it’s quite boring, so let’s focus on more interesting stuff we have also achieved.

  • Open Source for the Edge at IoT World

    As technologies converge to drive new innovation at the edge, organizations are working together more than ever to pave the road forward by combining the likes of 5G, AI/ML, Embedded Systems, High Performance Computing, Kubernetes, private/public environments and more. Companies are bringing specific domain expertise to the table, and SUSE is uniquely positioned with 28 years of Linux and open source expertise to serve as the foundation for developing, distributing and managing edge systems and the critical workloads they will support.

  • SUSE Partner Summit – Coming to a digital platform in mid-September!

Release Team to have retrospective meeting about openSUSE Leap 15.2

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SUSE

Members of the openSUSE community will have two retrospective meeting on the release of openSUSE Leap 15.2 after receiving feedback from the recent survey.

The meetings are scheduled for tomorrow, Thursday, at 06:00 - 08:00 UTC and 15:00 - 17:00 UTC.

Release Manager Luboš Kocman provided a short summary about the feedback received and information about the meeting in an email this week to the project.

“Thanks to everyone who participated in our openSUSE Leap 15.2 release retrospective that took place on survey.opensuse.org,” Kocman wrote. “The survey was fully anonymous and questions were: What went well and What didn’t go too well.

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Also: SUSE Documentation Survey 2020 – Second Take. Your Call to Action to Help Us Improve.

OpenSUSE: Election Campaign and Leap 15.2 Install Party

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SUSE

  • Stasiek Michalski answers Richard Brown's questions as the openSUSE election campaign progresses

    Community members are welcome to ask the candidates questions about their views on the project and to comment on some of the pertinent matters within the community. Richard Brown, former Chairman of openSUSE, put a few questions to Stasiek Michalski about his views on conflict resolution, the board structure and the project's key sponsor SUSE.

    Stasiek expressed his views as he answered Richard on the project mailing list.

  • Leap 15.2 Install party @ GOLEM - A quick report

    Ah, the event was also recorded, but they still have to let me know whether that worked well or not.

    I decided to do a live install as I think our installer is great, and wanted to show it off a bit. Smile In fact, I’ve heard a few times people saying that installing openSUSE is difficult, and I wanted to give it a shot to busting that myth.

    I showed how it is possible to install the distro with just a few clicks, which is the opposite of difficult. After that, I went back and explained all the various possible customizations that one can make – but only if she wants to– at each stage.

    Feedback on this was extremely good, and I think I’m going to reuse this same approach for other similar occasions.

    While the installer was copying packages, there was the time to talk a bit about the characteristics of Leap such as its goals, release cycle, development process, relationship with SLE, etc.

    I quickly mentioned the maintenance process, taking advantage of some slides kindly provided by Marina (thanks to you again as well!), and this also was perceived as very interesting.

    After the system was ready, I had the time to showcase YaST a little, to explain how to add Packman repos for the codecs and to introduce BTRFS snapshots, snapper and demo a reboot into a previous snapshot and the rollback.

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