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SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Latest KDE Goodies, LibreOffice 6.1 Office Suite

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SUSE

The openSUSE Project announced today that users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system series received all the latest Open Source software releases and GNU/Linux technologies.

Dominique Leuenberger reports that a total of eight snapshots have been released for OpenSuSE Tumbleweed users in the past two weeks, bringing the recently released KDE Plasma 5.13.3 desktop environment, as well as the KDE Applications 18.04.3 and KDE Frameworks 5.48.0 software suites.

Under the hood, openSUSE Tumbleweed is now powered by Linux kernel 4.17.9, X.Org Server 1.20.0 display server, PulseAudio 12.2 sound server, and Mesa 18.1.4 graphics stack. The default system compiler has been upgraded to the first GCC 8.2 Release Candidate, though the final release is already out so it should be available soon.

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Windows scores a win over Linux as another state decides to switch

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Microsoft
SUSE

The authority reasons that many of its field workers and telephone support services already use Windows, so standardisation makes sense. An upgrade of some kind would in any case be necessary soon, as the PCs are running OpenSuse versions 12.2 and 13.2, neither of which is supported anymore.

According to the Lower Saxony's draft budget, €5.9m is set aside for the migration in the coming year, with a further €7m annually over the following years; it's not yet clear how many years the migration would take.

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Five Reasons Businesses Should Consider Migrating to Linux

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GNU
Linux
SUSE

Linux has long-since established itself as a mainstream system for enterprises. If your company needs further convincing, here are five reasons for moving, according to SUSE’s Sabine Söllheim

Open source operating system, Linux, has positively impacted the world of technology since Linus Torvalds created it over 25 years ago. SAP is heralding it as the operating system of the future – a vote of confidence cemented by the fact the company has chosen to run its enterprise suite SAP HANA exclusively on Linux. It looks like 2018 is the year in which companies seriously start migrating to Linux.

Linux has long-since established itself as a mainstream system for enterprises, which in itself is enough to seriously consider the idea of switching. However, if your company needs further convincing, here are five reasons for moving.

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SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Bridges Barriers Between openSUSE and SLE

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SUSE

The SUSE Linux Enterprise is a multimodal operating system that is designed to handle business-critical workloads with an efficient and secure IT infrastructure. The latest release is designed to make it easier for openSUSE Linux community or development subscription users to upgrade their systems to the SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 with full functionality through the openSUSE Leap Linux distribution.

OpenSUSE Linux is an open source community project that is freely available for download and use. This version of the operating system is built atop the open source Linux kernel, and it consistently receives updates for its framework as well as the many tools and applications that the open source SUSE Linux community develops. OpenSUSE benefits all SUSE projects and releases by being the testing ground for many features that are later employed into commercial editions of the product. SUSE Linux Enterprise, for example, derives directly from openSUSE’s tested features. This operating system is a more stable and commercial server-oriented version of openSUSE that is often employed by businesses and corporations to manage their computer systems and data. SUSE Linux Enterprise products consist of the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES), SUSE Linux Enterprise Real Time (modified SLES), SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop (desktop client), and SUSE Linux Enterprise Thin Client (SLETC). Taking advantage of the fact that SLE derives from the testing and development of features in openSUSE, the latest release of the operating system, the SUSE Linux Enterprise 15, allows openSUSE community users of the operating system to upgrade to the more stable and concrete version from within their own OS. This does not however entail a new free download; the privilege is up for grabs for existing openSUSE users only.

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Also: SUSE launches new enterprise Linux to help the move to software-defined infrastructure

openSUSE Tumbleweed: a Linux Distro review

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Reviews
SUSE

The bittersweet result: I may be free of the operating system release cycle, but have spent far more time fussing over my rolling distro than I ever would have fussed to upgrade from point release A to point release B. openSUSE impresses, but I probably should have (sigh …) adopted their point release distro Leap instead, or stood pat with Mint. (Although I’ll likely Tumble from here on in, now that I’ve hacked my way through the worst of the Tumbleweed learning curve.)

If also tempted by the Tumbleweed bleeding edge: Dost thou know how to make and restore a disk image, either via the fabulous free Clonezilla or a commercial equivalent? Canst thou partition a disk, and, perhaps, fix a broken boot loader? I’ll dare to name these skills as entry bars for Tumbleweed adoption, especially the first one. I figured out how to do this stuff, still judge my knowledge as barely adequate to drive Tumbleweed daily. (Although one can install the Tumbleweed ISO in a virtual machine, fiddle to one’s heart’s content.)

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get LibreOffice 6.1, Mozilla Firefox 61, and FFmpeg 4

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SUSE

The month of July 2018 was pretty busy for the openSUSE Tumbleweed development team, and the first two weeks of the month already delivered dozens of updates and security fixes.

openSUSE developer Dominique Leuenberger reports that a total of nine snapshots have been released in July 2018 for the openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux operating system series, which follows a rolling release model where users install once and receive updates forever. As expected, these 9 snapshots bring numerous updates and bugfixes.

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SUSE 'Stealing' the News With M&A

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SUSE

SUSE at Large Scale

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SUSE
  • ​SUSE Linux Enterprise Server takes a big step forward

    SUSE doesn't get the ink that Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) or Canonical Ubuntu does, but it's still a darn fine Linux server distribution. Now, SUSE takes another step forward in the server room and data center with the mid-July release of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 15.

    SLES 15 will be available on x86-64, ARM, IBM LinuxONE, POWER, and z Systems in mid-July. So, no matter what your preferred server architecture, SUSE can work with you.

  • SUSE Announces Release of SUSE Linux Enterprise 15, SUSE Manager 3.2 and SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing 15

    Today, SUSE announced the release of SUSE Linux Enterprise 15, SUSE Manager 3.2 and SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing 15 with a focus on helping customers innovate in this era of rapid digital transformation while meeting the needs of multimodal IT.

  • SUSE Updates Enterprise Linux for the Multi-Cloud Era

    SUSE announced its Enterprise Linux 15 and SUSE Manager 3.2 updates on June 25, ushering in the next generation of enterprise Linux technologies from the Germany-based Linux vendor.

    SUSE Enterprise Linux 15 is the first time since 2014 that SUSE has changed the major version for its flagship platform. While SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 was announced back in 2014, SUSE never released a version 13 or 14, deciding instead to skip ahead to version 15 for the new update.

    "In various cultures, both 13 and 14 are unlucky numbers," Matthias Eckermann, director of SUSE Linux Enterprise product management, told eWEEK. "We were asked to not use these by partners and customers, so here we are at 15."

SUSE Linux Enterprise turns 15: Look, Ma! A common code base

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SUSE

SUSE today announced the impending release of SUSE Linux Enterprise 15, featuring a boatload of new toys and a leap in version numbering.

The new release, which is based on version 4.12 of the Linux kernel and allows the use of a wider variety of hardware (such as new AMD and Intel chipsets, Arm SOCs, NVDIMM, crypto cards and network devices), sees the adoption of a common code base over all flavours of the suite.

SUSE hopes that will make life easier for developers to transition applications over multimodal IT environments, where traditional infrastructure, software-defined infrastructure and a combination of both exist in an uneasy truce.

SUSE Linux Enterprise has been around for 17 years or so, with the last major release being version 12 in 2014, and the latest service pack (SP3) released last September. In March SUSE emitted a port of the suite for Arm, and the diminutive Raspberry Pi 3 Model B computer.

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Also: SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 delivers multimodal operating system to bridge traditional data center technologies with software-defined infrastructure

SUSE Paves the Way for IT Transformation in the Software-Defined Era

SUSE releases enhancements to CaaS platform

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SUSE

Germany-based SUSE Linux has released SUSE CaaS Platform 3, the third iteration of its container as a service platform.

A statement from the company said the platform included changes in Kubernetes to provide an enterprise-class container management solution that would allow application development and DevOps teams to deploy, manage and scale container-based applications and services.

In March, Peter Lees, SUSE's chief technologist for the Asia-Pacific region, told iTWire that containers would be the major focus for the company as it looked to consolidate its position in the region.

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OSS Leftovers

  • First results of the ROSIN project: Robotics Open-Source Software for Industry
    Open-Source Software for robots is a de-facto standard in academia, and its advantages can benefit industrial applications as well. The worldwide ROS-Industrial initiative has been using ROS, the Robot Operating System, to this end. In order to consolidate Europe’s expertise in advanced manufacturing, the H2020 project ROSIN supports EU’s strong role within ROS-Industrial. It will achieve this goal through three main actions on ROS: ensuring industrial-grade software quality; promoting new business-relevant applications through so-called Focused Technical Projects (FTPs); supporting educational activities for students and industry professionals on the one side conducting ROS-I trainings as well as and MOOCs and on the other hand by supporting education at third parties via Education Projects (EPs).
  • Baidu To Launch World’s First Intelligent Vehicle Infrastructure Cooperative Systems Open Source Solution By End Of 2018
    Baidu Inc. has announced it will launch the Apollo Intelligent Vehicle Infrastructure Cooperative Systems (IVICS) open-source solution by the end of 2018, leveraging its capabilities in autonomous driving to bring together intelligent vehicles and infrastructure to form a “human-vehicle-roadway” interplay – an important step toward developing future intelligent transportation.
  • Versity Open Sources Next Generation Archiving Filesystem
    The ScoutFS project was started in 2016 to address the rapidly growing demand for larger POSIX namespaces and faster metadata processing. The design goal for ScoutFS includes the ability to store up to one trillion files in a single namespace by efficiently distributing metadata handling across a scale out cluster of commodity compute nodes.
  • Moving from Wordpress
  • Epic Clock Clocks The Unix Epoch
    Admit it: when you first heard of the concept of the Unix Epoch, you sat down with a calculator to see when exactly 2³¹-1 seconds would be from midnight UTC on January 1, 1970. Personally, I did that math right around the time my company hired contractors to put “Y2K Suspect” stickers on every piece of equipment that looked like it might have a computer in it, so the fact that the big day would come sometime in 2038 was both comforting and terrifying. [Forklift] is similarly entranced by the idea of the Unix Epoch and built a clock to display it, at least for the next 20 years or so. Accommodating the eventual maximum value of 2,147,483,647, plus the more practical ISO-8601 format, required a few more digits than the usual clock – sixteen to be exact. The blue seven-segment displays make an impression in the sleek wooden case, about which there is sadly no detail in the build log. But the internals are well documented, and include a GPS module and an RTC. The clock parses the NMEA time string from the satellites and syncs the RTC. There’s a brief video below of the clock in action.
  • 3 top Python libraries for data science
    Python's many attractions—such as efficiency, code readability, and speed—have made it the go-to programming language for data science enthusiasts. Python is usually the preferred choice for data scientists and machine learning experts who want to escalate the functionalities of their applications. (For example, Andrey Bulezyuk used the Python programming language to create an amazing machine learning application.) Because of its extensive usage, Python has a huge number of libraries that make it easier for data scientists to complete complicated tasks without many coding hassles. Here are the top 3 Python libraries for data science; check them out if you want to kickstart your career in the field.
  • PortableCL 1.2 Still Coming While POCL 1.3 Will Further Improve Open-Source OpenCL
    It's been a number of months since last having any major news to report on POCL, the "PortableCL" project providing a portable OpenCL/compute implementation that can run on CPUs, select GPUs, and other accelerators. POCL 1.1 from March remains the current stable release while POCL 1.2 has been in the release candidate stage. The POCL 1.2 release candidates began last month with a few highlights like LLVM 7.0 support, device-side printf support, and HWLOC 2.0 library support.

New CloudBees Suite Addresses DevOps Gaps in Software Delivery

CloudBees is bringing a set of products into a new CloudBees Suite that it said will help companies of all sizes streamline the software development process. The new software is set to be announced Sept. 18 at the company’s DevOps World / Jenkins World conference in San Francisco. Jenkins is the open-source version of CloudBees, which is a commercial offering. A central piece of the CloudBees Suite is the CloudBees Core for unified governance of continuous delivery operations and processes used in DevOps. Software pipelines can also use Core to run software pipelines more efficiently in a self-managed way in the cloud or on-premises. Read more Also: CloudBees Announces Availability of Support for Jenkins Open Source

Chrome's Latest

Everything Is File In Linux - Part 1

Divided into 2 parts, in this first part I will introduce the concept that everything is file and present the special devices / dev / null, / dev / zero, / dev / random and / dev / full. Part 2 will be to present didactically interesting features about this, for example, how to turn a file into a partition! Read
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