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SUSE

SUSE Partners with Supermicro for OpenStack Cloud Hardware

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SUSE

Server vendor Supermicro has entered into a global partnership with Linux vendor SUSE that will benefit customers with new integrated OpenStack cloud hardware.

Patrick Quairoli, SUSE director of Alliance and Embedded Technology, told ServerWatch this is the first Supermicro SuperServeralliance agreement between SUSE and Supermicro.
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Events: OpenSUSE and Fedora in Germany and Peru

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • OpenSuSE Conference 2017 Nuremberg, Germany

    The event has grown and I felt a relaxed yet productive atmosphere when entering the venue. Just a few minutes after I arrived I hooked up with interesting people with even more interesting discussions. It was very nice to get together with all the Free Software friends I made over the last years. It was also pleasent to see the event becoming bigger and bigger. I take that as a sign that our community grows although it might also just be consolidation of events.

  • Fedora and GNOME at the Marine

    Our local Linux community “LinuXatUNI = Fedora + GNOME”  have received an invitation to do a talk regarding Linux security at the “THE MARINA OF WAR OF PERU”.

  • Closing the GNOME Peru Challenge 2017

    It’s been three months since a group of students from different universities decided to learn more about GNU/Linux in a local community. This idea started while LinuXatUNI had been organized and powered by Fedora and the GNOME project.

Linux Kernel 4.12 Coming Soon to openSUSE Tumbleweed, KDE Plasma 5.10.3 Is Here

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KDE
Linux
SUSE

openSUSE Project's Dominique Leuenberger is reporting today on the latest updates that landed in the main software repositories of the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system.

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Fujitsu, SUSE, and the YaST Development Sprint

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SUSE
  • Fujitsu and SUSE unveil ‘SUSE Business Critical Linux’ support
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 37

    We got a bug report about YaST not responding when a very long package changelog was displaying in the package manager. It turned out that some packages have a huge change log history with several thousands entries (almost 5000 for the kernel-default package). That produces a very long table which takes long time to parse and display in the UI.

    The solution is to limit the maximum number of displayed items in the UI. You cannot easily read that very long text anyway, for such a long text you would need some search functionality which the YaST UI does not provide.

    Finding the limit, that magic number, was not easy as we want to be backward compatible and display as much as possible but still avoid that pathological cases with a huge list.

Fujitsu and SUSE, Packages Updates in Tumbleweed

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SUSE
  • Fujitsu and SUSE Unveil 'SUSE Business Critical Linux' Support Service to Meet Industry Demand for Highly Reliable Support

    "SUSE Business Critical Linux" will be provided jointly by Fujitsu and SUSE to address customers' evolving needs with a highly reliable, 24/7 support framework that significantly extends current support periods, from five years to up to eight years per SUSE service pack.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Latest Mesa 17.1.3 Release for Better Gaming, More

    It's been only a week since our last report on the latest package updates that landed in the stable repositories of the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system, and Douglas DeMaio is back with some fresh info.

    According to his report, only three snapshots saw the light of day since last week, but they brought some major package updated to the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling distribution. First off, the graphics stack was updated to the latest Mesa 17.1.3 3D Graphics Library, which should add an extra layer of performance improvements for better gaming with AMD Radeon or Intel GPUs.

  • GStreamer, Mesa Packages Updated in Tumbleweed

    Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week brought a few major release packages and a clear example for how the automated testing tool openQA can prevents a snapshot from being released.

    The unicode character map Gucharmap, which uses the gtk+ toolkit and runs on any platform that gtk+ supports, was updated to version 10.0.0 in the repositories in the 20170625 snapshot. The GNOME project updated translations and support of editors like Bluefish as well as many others. Other major release were also in the 20170625 snapshot. An update of net-tools to version 2.0 dropped the network statistics (netstat) Extended Internet Daemon (xinetd) service to phase out xinetd. Users of the proc file-system get cgroup namespaces with the arrival of the psmisc 23.0 package.

openSUSE Leap Is Now 99.9% Enterprise Distribution

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SUSE

Two years ago when openSUSE decided to move the base of openSUSE Leap to SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE), they were entering uncharted territory. SLE is a tightly controlled enterprise ship that runs on mission critical systems. On the other hand openSUSE has been a community-driven project that, despite sponsorship from SUSE, is relatively independent.

It became clear, though, that moving to SLE source code would solve many problems for both members of the SUSE family. SLE would get a platform from where it can borrow the latest fully tested packages, and openSUSE Leap would get enterprise grade code base to move into CentOS and Ubuntu territory. SLE and openSUSE created a symbiotic relationship in which they were pulling content from each other.

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SUSE CaaS Platform

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SUSE

There are a lot of decisions to be made before enterprises are ready for production and deployment of container apps, asserts SUSE. To help enterprises derive full value from containerized apps and not "re-create the wheel", the SUSE engineering team is busy creating the next-generation application development and hosting platform for container applications and services.

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Also: SUSE software-defined infrastructure kicks CaaS

That OpenSUSE Tablet So Far Is A Dud

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SUSE

Remember that "openSUSE Tablet" last year that was seeking crowd-funding and even advertised by the openSUSE crew for being a Linux tablet as cheap as $200 USD? Sadly, it's not a reality while the company still appears to be formulating something.

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Tumbleweed Development and Laptop Experience

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets Qt 5.9, Linux Kernel 4.11.6, and MP3 Out-Of-The-Box

    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system are getting a lot of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software applications lately as a total of seven snapshots were released this week.

    openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio is back to report that openSUSE Tumbleweed is now powered by the latest Linux 4.11.6 kernel, and the GStreamer multimedia framework was updated to the major 1.12 series, adding out-of-the-box MP3 decoding support in the distribution.

  • Tumbleweed Gets Qt 5.9, mp3 Out-Of-The Box

    A total of seven openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots featuring new software were released this week along with an upgrade to GStreamer that allows for mp3 decoding to work out-of-the box.

    The newest stable Linux Kernel 4.11.6 is also available in the latest Tumbleweed snapshot 20170620.

    Updates in the repositories from the 20170620 snapshot brought both the 52.2 versions of Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird, which fixed some critical vulnerabilities. Systemd 233 provided a package for a new systemd-umount binary and, with the update of dracut 044.1, supports the new compatibility rule. Fontconfig’s 2.12.3 version fixed the build issues with gperf 3.1 and on GNU Hurd. The Beta 2 version of LibreOffice 5.4 cleaned up the license string and got rid of the Oxygen theme. A removal of support for old, non-systemd distros was made available in the snapshot with libvirt 3.4.0.

  • Dell Latitude D630 Tumbleweed Refresh

    I am not quick to buy new things, though I did replace my Dell Latitude D630 about three months ago with a newer Dell latitude E6440. My plan was to deprecate the machine and put it on a "reserve only" status. In my process of setting up the E6440, I found that I used my D630 still but quite differently, it became my home station machine and my E6440 would be my mobile machine that would return back to "base" where I would have it connect as a client to the D630 for keyboard and mouse. It was a rather nice arrangement.

    Unfortunately, the hard drive died on the D630 and I needed to install openSUSE once again on it in order to continue to use my workspace as I have been. What is $50 on a new hard drive to restore my SuperCubicle, right?

    [...]

    I run KDE Plasma for my desktop. I've tried others but the customization options in KDE Plasma just fits my personal tastes best. I have also been real happy with the speed improvements of KDE Plasma in the last couple years and especially those of KDE Plasma 5.10 on Tumbleweed as of late.

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