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openSUSE Ad-hoc Board Election 2020

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SUSE

Back in February 2020 Christian Boltz resigned from the openSUSE Board explaining the reasons behind his decision on the project mailing list. His resignation came about two weeks after Sarah Julia Kriesch's resignation from the Board.

The openSUSE Board was left with two vacant seats to be filled. Sarah had been a board member for just about a few weeks after the 2019-2020 board elections. After her resignation, the openSUSE Board decided to appoint Vinzenz Vietzke on the board based on the results of the 2019-2020 board elections. Following that, only one seat remained vacant on the board. However, before the Election Committee could start discussions for an election to fill that vacant seat, about two weeks after Vinzenz's appointment, openSUSE member Pierre Böckmann called for a No-Confidence vote against the current board. It was unprecedented in the community and that put things on halt for a while.

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Leftovers: OpenSUSE, Debian, Ubuntu and Command Line Heroes (Red Hat)

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Debian
SUSE
Ubuntu

  • Release Team Asks for Feedback on openSUSE Leap "15.2"

    The openSUSE release team is would like feedback from users, developers and stakeholders about the release of the of community-developed openSUSE Leap 15.2 through a survey.

    The survey is available at https://survey.opensuse.org.

    openSUSE Leap 15.2 was released on July 2. Two weeks of people installing the release and using it is a good timeframe to capture fresh ideas and thoughts about how people felt about the release. The survey centers on these two questions: what went well and what didn’t go well?

    That is the question the release team is asking of those who installed and used openSUSE Leap 15.2.

    The team hopes the feedback will provide enough information to help improve the release processes and other elements people found important.

    The survey will close on August 4.

  • DebConf Videoteam Sprint Report -- DebConf20@Home

    DebConf20 starts in about 5 weeks, and as always, the DebConf Videoteam is working hard to make sure it'll be a success. As such, we held a sprint from July 9th to 13th to work on our new infrastructure.

    [...]

    For DebConf20, we strongly encourage presenters to record their talks in advance and send us the resulting video. We understand this is more work, but we think it'll make for a more agreeable conference for everyone. Video conferencing is still pretty wonky and there is nothing worse than a talk ruined by a flaky internet connection or hardware failures.

    As such, if you are giving a talk at DebConf this year, we are asking you to read and follow our guide on how to record your presentation.

    Fear not: we are not getting rid of the Q&A period at the end of talks. Attendees will ask their questions — either on IRC or on a collaborative pad — and the Talkmeister will relay them to the speaker once the pre-recorded video has finished playing.

  • Abhijith PA: Workstation setup

    Recently I’ve seen lot of people sharing about their home office setup. I thought why don’t I do something similar. Not to beat FOMO, but in future when I revisit this blog, it will be lovely to understand that I had some cool stuffs.

    There are people who went deep down in the ocean to lay cables for me to have a remote job and I am thankful to them.

    Being remote my home is my office. On my work table I have a Samsung R439 laptop. I’ve blogged about it earlier. New addition is that it have another 4GB RAM, a total of 6GB and 120GB SSD. I run Debian testing on it. Laptop is placed on a stand. Dell MS116 as external mouse always connected to it. I also use an external keyboard from fingers. The keys are very stiff so I don’t recommend this to anyone. The only reason I took this keyboard that it is in my budget and have a backlit, which I needed most.

  • Best practices for an effective remote team in the world of cloud delivery

    Effective communication between customers, engineers, and project managers is the most critical element of successful cloud delivery. This has always been the case, but it is doubly important in the absence of regular, face-to-face contact.

    For remote teams, instant messaging is an invaluable tool. Internally, we use instant messaging both to keep in touch with one another and to coordinate on projects. However, it’s important to keep these two purposes separate. Maintaining one social channel and one business-focused channel prevents casual conversation from disrupting work.

    For communication with customers, the use of email is the standard tool. Indeed, official design decisions should not be made lightly and need to be documented. In order to avoid delays and have everyone stick to action points, we make sure to chase up through phone or message, but always need to communicate through email. This helps ensure that both parties stay up-to-date on a project’s status and that we have written confirmations.

  • Canonical Lets Global SIs Resell, Integrate Entire Portfolio

    An enhanced partner program from Canonical, publisher of the Ubuntu open-source operating system, will enable global systems integrators to resell and integrate the company’s entire portfolio of products and services for data centers, multicloud environments, the edge, and the Internet of Things (IoT).

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S13E17 – Knitting outside

    This week we’ve been filling in forms and doing kitchen renovations. We discuss popularity contest being removed from Ubuntu, 19.10 going EOL, KDEs cross-platform storefront and Linux adopting inclusive language. We also round up our picks from the wider tech news and share an event; remember those!

    It’s Season 13 Episode 17 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Command Line Heroes - Season 5, episode 1: Becoming a coder

    Saron Yitbarek and Clive Thompson start the season by exploring some ways coders start their tech careers—some common, many unexpected. You might be surprised who answers the call to code, where they come from, and how much they’ve already accomplished.

GNOME, KDE, libvirt Packages Update in Tumbleweed

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KDE
GNOME
SUSE

The desktops had a big week of updates in openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week.

Among the packages updated for the desktops this week were GNOME’s 3.36.4 version and the July 7 release of KDE’s Plasma 5.19.3, Applications 20.04.3 and the July 4 release of Frameworks 5.72.0.

Tumbleweed snapshots are trending stable this week and snapshot 20200714 is trending at a 99 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer. Both Frameworks and Applications were in the most recent snapshot. Applications had updates for the open-source video editing software Kdenlive. Fixes were made to new clips that could possibly crash and/or make clips disappear. The Akonadi storage framework had a server fix for the fetching of attributes with empty data; the topic need to be revisited, according to the commit. Frameworks 5.72.0 added a new DAV protocol implementation with KJobs. KDE’s input/output system library KIO and the user interface builder Kirigami had multiple updates. The Kirigami update provided better collapsing handling for UI and better presentation for list header items. The virtualization package Xen had a small update for its 4.13.1 version to fix incorrect error handling in event channel port allocation; A few patches were added and a handful of Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures were addressed. The hxtools collection of tools and scripts updated to 20200712 and added a new utility for arpeggio/polyphonic mixing of bsvplay/qplay outputs. Rubygem also had several different packages updated in the snapshot.

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openSUSE Board Non-Confidence Petition result announced

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SUSE

Two weeks ago the openSUSE Election Committee set up an electronic petition to measure whether 20% of the community members are in favour of a re-election of the current elected Board Members. Let me remind that a non-confidence vote was called by openSUSE member Pierre Böckmann. He explained his reasoning in the email he addressed to community members.

[...]

Out of the 509 eligible voters on Helios, 59 voted "Yes" for a re-election of the openSUSE Board. This result indicates that only 11.6% of the community voted in favour of a re-election.

Since the result is less than the 20% required for the complete Board's re-election, the Election Committee will proceed with an election to fill the current vacant seats only.

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openSUSE 15.2 Leap

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Reviews
SUSE

In my opinion openSUSE is a distribution which does a lot of things right. The project offers a lot of download options, covering a range of CPU architectures and desktop environments without its download options becoming overwhelming. The project's documentation is usually easy to find and read.

The project has an unusual style and its installer, menu layouts, and YaST administration panel are all a little alien when coming from other Linux distributions. This is not to say that openSUSE does things in a way that is better or worse, but it does have a distinct style that can take a little adjustment.

I think the project has a great set of configuration modules and YaST is a gem of a tool. I especially like that it integrates with Btrfs to automatically take snapshots whenever we make a configuration change in case we need to undo an action. This makes openSUSE virtually bullet-proof. In fact, openSUSE appears to be one of the only Linux distributions making use of Btrfs and its powerful features like snapshots and multi-disk volumes.

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Linux company SUSE outbids competitors for fast-growing start-up Rancher Labs

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SUSE

  • Linux company SUSE outbids competitors for fast-growing start-up Rancher Labs

    SUSE, a Linux distribution company controlled by private equity firm EQT, has agreed to acquire Rancher Labs, a start-up with technology that helps organizations run software in virtual containers across many servers.

    The companies announced the deal Wednesday but didn't disclose the terms. Two people familiar with the deal said SUSE is paying $600 million to $700 million.

    The transaction suggests that even during a recession, demand remains high for technology that can enable companies to operate more efficiently.

    Talks between the companies began in the spring, and the process became competitive with additional bids, Ursheet Parikh, a partner at Rancher backer Mayfield Fund, told CNBC on Tuesday. There were "lots of Zoom calls," Parikh said.

    In the past few years, with the rise of start-ups such as Docker, containers became a trendy alternative to more traditional virtualization technology for running applications on each computer server in a company data center. Amazon, Microsoft and other cloud providers came out with services that developers can use to place code in containers, and in 2017 SUSE introduced its own service for managing containers. The companies haven't finalized integration plans as the deal still faces regulatory approval.

  • SUSE to Acquire Rancher Labs, Creating World’s Largest Organization Exclusively Dedicated to Powering Digital Transformation With Open Source and Cloud Native Solutions

    Today, SUSE embarks on a new chapter in our incredible 28-year journey. I am thrilled to share that, SUSE has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Rancher Labs, a market-leading, Enterprise Kubernetes Management vendor based in Cupertino, California.   

    This is an incredible moment for SUSE and for our industry, as two open source leaders join forces to create the world’s largest independent organization dedicated exclusively to powering digital transformation with open source and cloud native solutions.

    I want to share my perspective on why we chose Rancher, and how this acquisition will benefit our customers, partners, and communities.

Review of the HP Pavilion 14-ce0830nd

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Hardware
Reviews
SUSE

Would I recommend the HP Pavilion 14-ce0830nd? To be honest, its a mixed bag on openSUSE. Installation of openSUSE Leap 15.2 was very easy. And installation of a dual boot system with Windows 10 was easy as well. The laptop has an attractive look and feel. The display, speakers, keyboard and external ports are all good. The touchpad is too sensitive. The machine has enough RAM, enough storage and the hard drives are performant. The Intel CPU/GPU is great. Which means that this is a great machine for multitasking. The gaming performance on the Intel GPU on openSUSE Leap 15.2 is good enough to play various open source games on medium/high settings.

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OpenSUSE Leap 15.2 Released

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SUSE

  • openSUSE Leap "15.2" Release Brings Exciting New Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning, and Container Packages

    The openSUSE release team is proud to announce the availability of community-developed openSUSE Leap 15.2. Professional users, from desktops and data-center servers to container hosts and Virtual Machines (VM), will be able to use Leap 15.2 as a high-quality, easy-to-use, enterprise-grade Linux operating system.

  • OpenSUSE Leap 15.2 Released With AI/ML Packages Added, YaST Improvements

    OpenSUSE Leap 15.2 is out today as the Linux distribution built from the same sources as SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 sources.

    OpenSUSE Leap 15.2 adds a number of new packages, particularly on the machine learning and artificial intelligence front. Tensorflow, PyTorch, ONNX, and other popular AI/ML solutions are finally packaged up for openSUSE Leap. Leap 15.2 also has Kubernetes support available as an official package for the first time. There are also a variety of other container additions to Leap 15.2 in catching up to the other Linux distributions catering to container workloads.

  • OpenSUSE Leap 15.2 released

    The openSUSE Leap 15.2 release is now available; see the announcement for a long list of new features. "In general, software packages in the distribution grew by the hundreds. Data fusion, Machine Learning and AI aren't all that is new in openSUSE Leap 15.2; a Real-Time Kernel for managing the timing of microprocessors to ensure time-critical events are processed as efficiently as possible is available in this release."

  • openSUSE Leap 15.2 Released With Focus on Containers, AI and Encryption

    openSUSE Leap 15.2 has finally landed with some useful changes and improvements.

    Also, considering the exciting announcement of Closing the Leap Gap, the release of openSUSE Leap 15.2 brings us one step closer to SLE (SUSE Linux Enterprise) binaries being integrated to openSUSE Leap 15.3 next.

    Let’s take a look at what has changed and improved in openSUSE Leap 15.2.

  • openSUSE Leap 15.2 Officially Released, Here’s What’s New

    The openSUSE Project released today openSUSE Leap 15.2, the second major installment in the latest openSUSE Leap 15 operating system series, based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP2.

    openSUSE Leap 15.2 comes more than a year after openSUSE Leap 15.1 to bring you not only software updates and security fixes, but also new applications and technologies. Most specifically, it brings exciting new Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML), and Deep Learning (DL) technologies.

    Among these, there’s Tensorflow, a deep learning framework used by data scientists for numerical computations and data-flow graphs, PyTorch, a machine learning library, ONNX, a program that provides interoperability in the AI tool space, as well as the Grafana and Prometheus tools for creating interactive visual analytics.

OpenSUSE Leap 15.2 set for release

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SUSE

OpenSUSE Leap 15.2 is complete and ready for a planned release on July 2. Leap is the version based on SUSE Linux Enterprise, but with many updated packages; see the 15.2 features page for an overview of what's coming. "Leap 15.2 is filled with several containerization technologies like Singularity, which bring containers and reproducibility to scientific computing and the high-performance computing (HPC) world. Singularity first appeared in the Leap distribution in Leap 42.3 and provides functionality to build smallest minimal containers and runs the containers as single application environments. Another official package in Leap 15.2 is libcontainers-common, which allows the configuration of files and manpages shared by tools that are based on the github.com/containers libraries, such as Buildah, CRI-O, Podman and Skopeo. Docker containers and tooling make building and shipping applications easy and fast."

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Also: openSUSE Leap 15.2 is Gold!

Tumbleweed Gets LibreOffice "7", New Breezy Features

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LibO
SUSE

LibreOffice 7 beta 2 was updated in snapshot 20200622. The new major version improves the usage of quotation marks and an apostrophe in several languages with autocorrect. LibreOffice 7 adds support for exporting to new versions of Open Document Format, available via Tools > Options > Load/Save > General > ODF format version: “ODF 1.3” and “ODF 1.3 Extended”; the latter is the default, unless the user has previously changed the version in the configuration. Another new (experimental) feature is to make documents more accessible: an accessibility check tool to review common accessibility problems in documents, and support for PDF/UA specifications in the PDF export dialog. To enable the accessibility check tool and the PDF/UA export, go to: Tools > Options… > LibreOffice > Advanced > Optional Features > Enable experimental features (may be unstable). Then restart LibreOffice. A handful of libraries were updated in the snapshot including libzip 1.7.1, which restore LIBZIP_VERSION_{MAJOR,MINOR,MICRO} symbols, and gnome-desktop 3.36.3.1 had some clock and translation updates. The general-purpose scripting language php7 updated to version 7.4.7 fixed a regression in the previous version when yielding an array based generator and fixed a bug that involved hangs when an invalid value was encountered. The microcode updates for Intel x86/x86-64 CPUs, ucode-intel, reverted some code for the processor microarchitecture Skylake in the snapshot that caused some stability issues. The snapshot is trending moderately stable with a rating of 78, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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Also: User defined color for symbols in LibreOffice Math formulas

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