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SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed and 'Cloud'

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get KDE Plasma 5.10.5 and KDE Applications 17.08

    If you're wondering why you haven't received any snapshots lately for your openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system, you should know that the openSUSE Linux devs had a hard time last week fixing various things and integrate the DNF package manager.

    openSUSE Project's Dominique Leuenberger recently informed the Tumbleweed community that the main reason behind the single snapshot released last week for the GNU/Linux distribution was that the DNF integration created metadata in the repository that was only valid for Tumbleweed systems, not Leap.

  • openSUSE Leap 42.3 Cloud Images Debut for Google Compute Engine, Microsoft Azure

    If you want to use the latest openSUSE Leap 42.3 open-source computer operating system on the cloud, you should know that the openSUSE Project released a set of cloud images for various of the most popular cloud services on the market.

    openSUSE Leap 42.3 launched for 64-bit and 32-bit platforms at the end of July 2017, based on the commercial SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack (SP) 3 operating system, and it's currently the latest stable release of the popular RPM-based Linux OS. It ships with the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel and up-to-date packages.

OpenSUSE Leap 42.3 Plasma - No Linux, No Love

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SUSE

So what do we have here? Well, in the end, I have a working system, with 95% of all my original issues and woes fixed. It took me a single day to do all this. Which means the devs and the QA can do so much more. OpenSUSE Leap 42.3 in its default form is not usable. It has terrible hardware support - all the basics are screwed, wonky package management with conflicts and issues, codec problems, bad customization, performance issues, battery issues, filesystem misbehaving, etc. Completely unusable in this form really.

I managed to overcome all these, because I had a free day and I wanted to see what I can do. But then, my version of SUSE has little with the original. A new kernel, different looks, tons of extra software, lots of configuration changes and fixes. Except the name, it's not really a Leap, now is it. Just a Linux with Plasma and such. Thus, my sad summary is that while my games with openSUSE 42.3 were fun, the core product is not suitable for day to day use. You're better off with Kubuntu or even Fedora. Or anything. The amount of problems here was among the biggest in years. Very sad, because SUSE will always have that special place in my heart. Grade 3/10. With my changes 9/10. And lights.

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Also: SUSE Pulls ‘Game of Thrones’ Parody From YouTube to Foil FOSS Force

Linux pioneer SUSE marks 25 years in the field

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SUSE

The Germany-based SUSE Linux marked a milestone over the last few days: on Friday, 2 September, the company turned 25, a remarkable achievement in an industry where the remains of software companies litter the landscape around the world.

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KDE's Leaner Experience On openSUSE Tumbleweed vs. Ubuntu 17.04

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KDE
SUSE
Ubuntu

With the Power Use, RAM + Boot Times With Unity, Xfce, GNOME, LXDE, Budgie and KDE Plasma tests this week, many expressed frustration over the heavy KDE packaging on Ubuntu leading to the inflated results for the Plasma 5 desktop tests. For some additional reference, here is how KDE Plasma (and GNOME Shell) compare when running on Ubuntu 17.04 vs. openSUSE Tumbleweed.

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SUSE Vs Funny People Wearing Red Hats

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Red Hat
SUSE

Watching this video from SUSE, you might be excused for thinking you’re watching a trailer for a new Netflix original which looks suspiciously like “Game of Thrones.” To paraphrase an old Dodge commercial: “You can tell they’re bad guys because they all wear Red Hats.”

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Did SUSE Linux Just Take a Dig at Red Hat Linux?

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Did SUSE Linux Just Take a Dig at Red Hat Linux?

    I am a huge fan of SUSE Linux…. parody videos. I even call SUSE the coolest Linux enterprise for the awesome Linux parody songs they make. I mean, who can forget the catchy Uptime Funk. Even today I sing ‘don’t reboot it just patch’.

  • Video: SUSE Game of Thrones Parody

    More competition is good, right?

  • Red Hat announces latest version of enterprise-grade Kubernetes container application platform

    Red Hat, Inc. has announced the general availability of Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 3.6, the latest version of Red Hat’s enterprise-grade Kubernetes container application platform.

    Organizations across the globe, like Copel Telecom, are turning towards cloud-native applications as a pathway to digital transformation, but critical IT needs like greater application security, compliance and service consistency must still be answered. Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 3.6 helps to address these challenges with a new PCI-DSS applicability guide and fine-grained network policy and control, as well as the introduction of new features designed to deliver consistent applications across hybrid and multi-cloud deployments.

SUSE Studio - Mix it up

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SUSE

It's been a long time since I played with SUSE Studio. Eight years to be exact. That's a fairly hefty stretch of time, which means another review is due. Before you ask, no it's not a German alternative rock band, nor a night club. And yes, it is an online portal that lets you create custom SUSE images. Very clever.

In my original review, I focused on the simplicity and difficulty of use of the portal, assembling different packages into a working image, the testing, and the complexity of this whole deal. I built on my earlier experience with Kiwi and then Product Creator, and back in 2009, this was an amazing, revolutionary concept. Let's see what gives now.

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SUSE Policy on Btrfs and Kubic

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SUSE
  • SUSE pledges endless love for btrfs, says Red Hat's dumping irrelevant

    SUSE has decided to let the world it has no plans to step away from the btrfs filesystem and plans to make it even better.

    The company's public display of affection comes after Red Hat decided not to fully support the filesystem in its own Linux.

    Losing a place in one of the big three Linux distros isn't a good look for any package even if, as was the case with this decision, Red Hat was never a big contributor or fan of btrfs.

  • SUSE Remains Committed To The Btrfs File-System

    While Red Hat is backing away from Btrfs support in favor of their next-gen Stratis project and mature Linux file-systems like EXT4 and XFS, SUSE is reaffirming their support for Btrfs.

    SUSE was the first to significantly back Btrfs by making it the default file-system in SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12. While other major distributions haven't been following in that same direction and Red Hat recently deprecating their Btrfs support, SUSE has made it clear they will continue investing in Btrfs.

  • In riposte to Red Hat, SUSE affirms support for Btrfs

    Germany-based SUSE Linux has reacted to Red Hat's recent announcement that it would be deprecating the Btrfs filesystem by affirming that it would continue to be the default option for its enterprise Linux distribution.

  • Introducing Kubic: a community-driven container-as-a-service platform

    MicroOS is SUSE's modern and slightly different take on cluster computing for containers and microservices. This is what you ought to know about it.

Butter bei die Fische!

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SUSE

If Brazil, one of the world biggest producers of beef, would announce to stop producing fish: would you wonder, whether Peru, one of the world biggest producers of fish, would stop producing fish?

You probably wouldn’t.

If one of the rather small contributors to the btrfs filesystem announced to not support btrfs for production systems: should you wonder, whether SUSE, strongest contributor to btrfs today, would stop investing into btrfs?

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SUSE Now Offers Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications on the Google Cloud

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Linux
SUSE

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications is now available as the operating system for SAP solutions on the Google Cloud Platform (GCP), allowing enterprise customers to become more agile and reduce operating costs by only paying for what they use

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FATHOM releases Crystallon

  • FATHOM releases Crystallon, an open-source software for lattice-based design
    Lattice structures are integral to 3D printed designs, and Aaron Porterfield, an industrial designer at additive manufacturing service bureau FATHOM, has developed Crystallon, an open source project for shaping them into structures.
  • FATHOM Introduces Open Source Software Project for Generating 3D Lattice Structures
    California-based FATHOM, which expanded its on-site managed services and announced important partnerships with Stratasys and Desktop Metal last year, is introducing a fascinating new open source project called Crystallon, which uses Rhino and Grasshopper3D to create lattice structures. FATHOM industrial designer Aaron Porterfield, also an Instructables member, developed the project as an alternative to designing lattices with commercially available software. He joined the company’s design and engineering team three years ago, and is often a featured speaker for its Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) Training Program – and as the project developer, who better to explain the Crystallon project?

Kernel and Graphics: Machine Learning, Mesa, Wayland/Mir, AMDGPU

  • AI-Powered / Machine Learning Linux Performance Tuning Is Now A Thing
    A year and a half ago I wrote about a start-up working on dynamically-tuned, self-optimizing Linux servers. That company is now known as Concertio and they just launched their "AI powered" toolkit for IT administrators and performance engineers to optimize their server performance. Concertio Optimizer Studio is their product making use of machine learning that aims to optimize Linux systems with Intel CPUs for peak performance by scoping out the impact of hundreds of different tunables for trying to deliver an optimal configuration package for that workload on that hardware.
  • Pengutronix Gets Open-Source 3D Working On MX8M/GC7000 Hardware
    We've known that Pengutronix developers had been working on i.MX8M / GC7000 graphics support within their Etnaviv open-source driver stack from initial patches posted in January. Those patches back at the start of the year were for the DRM kernel driver, but it turns out they have already got basic 3D acceleration working.
  • SDL Now Disables Mir By Default In Favor Of Wayland Compatibility
    With Mir focusing on Wayland compatibility now, toolkits and other software making direct use of Mir's APIs can begin making use of any existing Wayland back-end instead. GTK4 drops the Mir back-end since the same can be achieved with the Wayland compatibility and now SDL is now making a similar move.
  • Mesa 18.1 Receives OpenGL 3.1 With ARB_compatibility For Gallium3D Drivers
    Going back to last October, Marek of AMD's open-source driver team has been working on ARB_compatibility support for Mesa with a focus on RadeonSI/Gallium3D. Today that work was finally merged. The ARB_compatibility support allows use of deprecated/removed features of OpenGL by newer versions of the specification. ARB_compatibility is particularly useful for OpenGL workstation users where there are many applications notorious for relying upon compatibility contexts / deprecated GL functionality. But ARB_compatibility is also used by a handful of Linux games too.
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.17 Exposes WattMan Features, GPU Voltage/Power Via Hwmon
    AMD's Alex Deucher today sent in the first pull request to DRM-Next of AMDGPU (and Radeon) DRM driver feature material that will in turn be merged with the Linux 4.17 kernel down the road. There's some fun features for AMDGPU users coming with this next kernel! First up, Linux is finally getting some WattMan-like functionality after it's been available via the Windows Radeon Software driver since 2016. WattMan allows for more fine-tuning of GPU clocks, voltages, and more for trying to maximize the power efficiency. See the aforelinked article for details but currently without any GUI panel for tweaking all of the driver tunables, this WattMan-like support needs to be toggled from the command-line.

Wine and Ganes: World of Warcraft, Farm Together, Madcap Castle, Cityglitch

Security Leftovers