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Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • How a service mesh helps manage distributed microservices

    A service mesh brings security, resiliency, and visibility to service communications, so developers don’t have to

  • RHEL 8: 'the foundation for digital transformation'
  • 7 infrastructure performance and scaling tools you should be using

    Sysadmins, site reliability engineers (SREs), and cloud operators all too often struggle to feel confident in their infrastructure as it scales up. Also too often, they think the only way to solve their challenges is to write a tool for in-house use. Fortunately, there are options. There are many open source tools available to test an infrastructure's performance. Here are my favorites.

  • Future of CRDs: Structural Schemas

    Authors: Stefan Schimanski (Red Hat)

    CustomResourceDefinitions were introduced roughly two years ago as the primary way to extend the Kubernetes API with custom resources. From the beginning they stored arbitrary JSON data, with the exception that kind, apiVersion and metadata had to follow the Kubernetes API conventions. In Kubernetes 1.8 CRDs gained the ability to define an optional OpenAPI v3 based validation schema.

    By the nature of OpenAPI specifications though—only describing what must be there, not what shouldn’t, and by being potentially incomplete specifications—the Kubernetes API server never knew the complete structure of CustomResource instances. As a consequence, kube-apiserver—until today—stores all JSON data received in an API request (if it validates against the OpenAPI spec). This especially includes anything that is not specified in the OpenAPI schema.

  • Redis 5 now available on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

    Red Hat Software Collections supply the latest, stable versions of development tools for Red Hat Enterprise Linux via two release trains per year. As part of the latest Software Collections 3.3 release, we are pleased to announce that Redis 5 is now generally available and supported on RHEL 7.

    The new Red Hat Software Collection includes Redis 5.0.3. Redis 5 is an open source in-memory data structure store, used as a database, cache and/or message broker. This version provides multiple enhancements and bug fixes over version 3.2 distributed with an earlier Red Hat Software Collections release. Most notably, the redis-trib cluster management tool has been implemented in the Redis command-line interface.

    The primary addition in Redis 5 is Streams—a new log-like data structure for storing multiple fields and string value with automatic sequencing. For detailed changes in Redis, see the upstream release notes for version 4.0 and version 5.0.

  • Mentoring new system administrators

    While this article is geared toward senior system administrators taking a more active role in the development of newer team members, those readers who are new might find interest in a different view of the world of working with newer systems administrators.

    As a system administrator who has been in the role for a long time, it’s easy to shake a proverbial cane at those newer team members who bother you with inane questions lacking the technical detail needed to provide a complete answer. It would be so easy to gruffly utter a few words to get them to go away, or point out the lack of specificity of the question in such a way as to make them feel so small that they won't talk to you again. I’ve been there, and—being frank—done exactly that.

    I was recently reading a discussion forum where there was an administrator who appeared inexperienced and, apparently, all on his or her own to figure things out. That caused me to think back to my first system administration job, and realize how thankful I am that when I started, I had someone senior who was willing to invest time in helping me become better. This better didn’t come in the form of drilling me with commands or syntax, but with a more Socratic method to help me develop skills that I use almost every day.

    When I first started with the group, whenever I hit an issue, I would go down to Chris’ office with my notepad and pencil and ask him about the problem (sometimes multiple times a day). After about a week of this, I came into his office, as usual, to ask about a system call or something. He didn’t look at me and put his hand up, signaling me to stop.

    After he finished whatever it was he was working on, he turned to me and said, “What research have you done about this question? Man pages? Google searches? -h output?”

    I said, “No, I just came down here to ask you.”

  • SUSE now member of iRODS, Sponsor of User Group Meeting

    This month, SUSE became a member of the iRODS (integrated Rule-Oriented Data System) consortium which is an open source data management software used by research organizations and government agencies worldwide.

    [...]

    iRODS UGM will host 25+ presentations from the user community and the core development team, including use case presentations, live demonstrations, and open discussions about requested iRODS features. They anticipate an audience of 150 participants representing dozens of academic, government, and commercial institutions.

Renaming openSUSE

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SUSE

At the 2019 openSUSE Conference, the openSUSE board discussed governance options at length. There will evidently be an official statement on its conclusions in the near future, but that has not been posted as of this writing. It would appear, though, that the board chose a foundation structure over the other options. A German registered association (e. V.) would have been easier to set up than a foundation, but an association has weaker restrictions so it could potentially shift its focus away from the openSUSE mission. Joining another umbrella group seemingly lacked appeal from the beginning, as did the option of doing nothing and leaving things as they are now.

The stated purpose of the foundation is to make it easier for openSUSE to accept donations and manage its own finances — things that are hard for the project to do now. The foundation structure, in particular, allows the project to enshrine its core objectives (such as support for free software) into the DNA of the organization, making it hard to divert the foundation toward some other goal. A foundation also allows openSUSE to retain its current governing board and membership structure.

In the absence of an official statement from the board, details on the decision and the reasoning behind it can be had by watching this YouTube video of a question-and-answer session with the board at the openSUSE Conference.

One motivation for the change that wasn't highlighted in the board session, but which was an undercurrent in the discussions leading up to it, is a desire for more independence from SUSE in general driven by concerns about what the company might do in the future. Such worries are not entirely irrational, even though by all accounts SUSE management is fully supportive of openSUSE now. A company's attitude can change quickly even in the absence of external events like a change of ownership. If SUSE were to be sold yet again, the new owners could take a rather dimmer view of the openSUSE project.

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OpenSUSE/SUSE: Leap 15.1 Update Experience, Btrfs in YaST, SUSECON and SUSE GSI Partner Forum

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SUSE
  • The openSUSE Leap 15.1 update experience

    My desktop is a HP Pavilion Power 580-146nd. This is a midsize PC with an AMD Ryzen 5 1400 CPU, an AMD Radeon RX 580 GPU, 16 GB of RAM, a 128 GB M.2 SSD and a 1 TB 7200rpm HDD.

    I used the same USB thumbstick. After selecting ‘Update’ from the boot menu, the whole screen went black. And then nothing happened. Since I have installed openSUSE many times before, I quickly realized that this must be a graphics issue. I used ‘nomodeset’ in the past to get around that issue. This causes the installer to go back to the most basic graphics settings but it also means I could finish the update.

    It used to be a lot easier to edit the boot options. However, this is now hidden. This post on Stack Exchange (2) gives a great explanation how to enable nomodeset, both as a one-time option and as a permanent option.

    For the permanent enablement of nomodeset I know an easier way: in YaST look for the module ‘Boot Loader’ and in the Kernel Parameters tab, you can edit the boot command. This was the route that I took to make nomodeset a permanent boot setting.

  • Getting further with Btrfs in YaST

    Since the YaST team rewrote the software stack for managing the storage devices, we have been adding and presenting new capabilities in that area regularly. That includes, among other features, the unpaired ability to format and partition all kind of devices and the possibility of creating and managing Bcache devices. Time has come to present another largely awaited feature that is just landing in openSUSE Tumbleweed: support for multi-device Btrfs file systems.

    As our usual readers surely know, Btrfs is a modern file system for Linux aimed at implementing advanced features that go beyond the scope and capabilities of traditional file systems. Such capabilities include subvolumes (separate internal file system roots), writable and read-only snapshots, efficient incremental backup and our today’s special: support for distributing a single file system over multiple block devices.

  • openSUSE's YaST Now Supports Multi-Device Btrfs Setups

    For those wanting to install openSUSE Tumbleweed on a system where a single Btrfs file-system spans multiple block devices, that's now easily possible with the latest YaST. This includes the abilities for just a simple file-system spanning multiple devices to data duplication to the various RAID levels natively supported by Btrfs.

  • An application a year to an application a week on AWS

    At the recent SUSECON conference in Nashville, Ryan Niksch from AWS discussed how shifting the focus from writing code to deploying applications to production has become more critical as business agility tops the list of customer requirements. He then introduces the benefits of Cloud Foundry in general, and SUSE Cloud Application Platform specifically, including the AWS service broker; its benefits are that it is a containerized distribution of Cloud Foundry that can very quickly and easily be deployed to AWS using a Quick Start template.

  • THE Forum exclusively for GSI Partners!

    This year’s SUSE GSI Partner Forum will feature all these – you won’t want to miss it!

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Are DevOps certifications valuable? 10 pros and cons
  • Kubernetes 1.15: Enabling the Workloads

    The last mile for any enterprise IT system is the application. In order to enable those applications to function properly, an entire ecosystem of services, APIs, databases and edge servers must exist. As Carl Sagan once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.”

    To create that IT universe, however, we must have control over its elements. In the Kubernetes universe, the individual solar systems and planets are now Operators, and the fundamental laws of that universe have solidified to the point where civilizations can grow and take root.

    Discarding the metaphor, we can see this in the introduction of Object Count Quota Support For Custom Resources. In English, this enables administrators to count and limit the number of Kubernetes resources across the broader ecosystem in a given cluster. This means services like Knative, Istio, and even Operators like the CrunchyData PostgreSQL Operator, the MongoDB Operator or the Redis Operator can be controlled via quota using the same mechanisms that standard Kubernetes resources have enjoyed for many releases.

    That’s great for developers, who can now be limited by certain expectations. It would not benefit the cluster for a bad bit of code to create 30 new PostgreSQL clusters because someone forgot to add a “;” at the end of a line. Call them “guardrails” that protect against unbounded object growth in your etcd database.

  • Red Hat named HPE’s Partner of the Year at HPE Discover 2019

    For more than 19 years, Red Hat has collaborated with HPE to develop, deliver and support trusted solutions that can create value and fuel transformation for customers. Our work together has grown over these nearly two decades and our solutions now include Linux, containers and telecommunications technologies, to name just a few. As a testament to our collaboration, HPE has named Red Hat the Technology Partner of the Year 2019 for Hybrid Cloud Solutions.

  • Demystifying Containers – Part II: Container Runtimes

    This series of blog posts and corresponding talks aims to provide you with a pragmatic view on containers from a historic perspective. Together we will discover modern cloud architectures layer by layer, which means we will start at the Linux Kernel level and end up at writing our own secure cloud native applications.
    Simple examples paired with the historic background will guide you from the beginning with a minimal Linux environment up to crafting secure containers, which fit perfectly into todays’ and futures’ orchestration world. In the end it should be much easier to understand how features within the Linux kernel, container tools, runtimes, software defined networks and orchestration software like Kubernetes are designed and how they work under the hood.

  • Edge > Core > Cloud: Transform the Way You Want

    For more than 25 years, SUSE has been very successful in delivering enterprise-grade Linux to our customers. And as IT infrastructure has shifted and evolved, so have we. For instance, we enabled and supported the move to software-defined data centers as virtualization and containerization technologies became more prevalent and data growth demanded a new approach.

  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud Technology Preview Takes Flight

    We are pleased to announce that as of today we are making a technology preview of a containerized version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud available that will demonstrate a future direction for our product. The lifecycle management for this technology preview is based on an upstream OpenStack project called Airship, which SUSE has been using and contributing to for some time. This follows our open / open policy of upstream first and community involvement.

SUSE: SLE 12 Service Pack 5 Beta 1 and More

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SUSE
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 5 Beta 1
  • A demo based introduction to SUSE Cloud Application Platform

    At the recent SUSECON conference in Nashville, Peter Andersson and Peter Lunderbye from SUSE demonstrated SUSE Cloud Application Platform, including pushing your first app, buildpacks: what are they and how they can be utilised, scaling and how easy the platform makes it, and how to improve resiliency and availability of your app.
    SUSE has posted all recorded talks from SUSECON on YouTube. Check them out if you want to learn more about what SUSE has to offer. We’re not just Linux anymore! I’ll be posting more SUSE Cloud Application Platform talks here over the coming days.

  • Enabling Discoveries with AI and HPC (and the Rise of Helium)

    This week I am attending the International Supercomputing conference in Frankfurt, and I am in awe of the scientists and researchers that are here and their ability to dig in and understand super complex problems in very specialized areas.  While I am humbled by the world-changing work represented at a conference like this, I am also honored to be playing a small part in their success.  With the next iteration of SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing 15 SP1, we’ve expanded and refreshed our bundle of popular HPC tools and libraries that we make available along with every subscription to our SLE HPC operating system.

New node.js LTS, GNU Debugger, libvirt Updates Arrive in Tumbleweed Snapshots

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SUSE

One of those key packages was an update of the GNU Debugger, gdb 8.3, which was released in the 20190607 snapshot. The debugger enabled ada tests on ppc64le and riscv64; multitarget builds for riscv64 were also enabled. The snapshot also added unit test for Logical Volume Manager (LVM) over Modular Disk (MD) with the update of libstorage-ng 4.1.127. Several patches and bug fixes were applied with the update of libvirt 5.4.0, which also made an improvement to avoided unnecessary static linking that results in both the disk and memory footprint being reduced. Libvirt also introduced support for the md-clear CPUID bit. The python-libvirt-python 5.4.0 package added all new Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) and constants in libvirt 5.4.0. Text editor vim 8.1.1467 had multiple fixes, but the Tumbleweed snapshot introduced some new bugs and is currently trending at an 86 rating, according to the snapshot reviewer.

The two previous snapshots recorded an exceptional stable rating of 98 according to the snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190606 updated just two packages. The nodejs10 package put out a new upstream Long-Term-Support (LTS) version with nodejs10 10.16.0, which upgraded upgrade openssl sources to 1.1.1b and libuv to 1.28.0. The other package update in the snapshot was xfdesktop 4.12.5; the package for the Xfce 4 Desktop Environment fixed icon sizes in settings, reset the desktop icon order and fixed a timer leak.

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Red Hat and SUSE: Openshift, RHEL and Cloudwashing

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Using Kubernetes Operators to Manage Let’s Encrypt SSL/TLS Certificates for Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated
  • No Downtime Upgrade for Red Hat Data Grid on Openshift

    In a blog post I wrote on the Red Hat Developer’s Blog, I wrote about multiple layers of security available while deploying Red Hat Data Grid on Red Hat Openshift. Another challenging problem I see for customer is performing a no downtime upgrade for Red Hat Data Grid images (published on Red Hat Container Catalog). That’s what we’re going to tackle in this post.

    If you’re new to it, Red Hat Data Grid is an in-memory, distributed, NoSQL datastore solution. With it, your applications can access, process, and analyze data at in-memory speed designed to deliver a superior user experience compared to traditional data stores like relational databases. In-memory Data Grids have a variety of use cases in today’s environments, such as fast data access for low-latency apps, storing objects (NoSQL) in a datastore, achieving linear scalability with data distribution/partitioning, and data high-availability across geographies.

  • World domination with cgroups in RHEL 8: welcome cgroups v2!

    One of the great things about open source development is that features can be designed and implemented organically and grow and change as needed. However, a drawback is that this methodology can sometimes lead to a hot mess and uncomfortable technical debt.

    In the case of cgroups v1, as the maintainer Tejun Heo admits, "design followed implementation," "different decisions were taken for different controllers," and "sometimes too much flexibility causes a hindrance."

    In short, not all of the controllers behave in the same manner and it is also completely possible to get yourself into very strange situations if you don’t carefully engineer your group hierarchy. Therefore, cgroups v2 was developed to simplify and standardize some of this.

    Let’s take a look at how the two versions are different. I’m going to show two different diagrams - controllers are in yellow blocks and cgroup directories have a grey background.

  • Cloud Strategies in Frankfurt
  • Are We Ready to Ditch the Data Center? [Ed: Perpetuating the myth that when you outsource all business functions to the Pentagon through its partners the servers just vanish and cease to exist]

    Over the past few decades, organizations have come to rely on their own data centers to run business applications, network their users together and for data storage. Initially, these data centers were largely hardware-centric.In the early days, a mainframe and terminals were the order of the day, before we moved onto the RISC/UNIX era, followed more recently by the server sprawl period of commodity X86 servers.
    But now, the whole concept of an organization-owned data center is going through a radical change. It started with virtualization, which separated the direct relationship between application software and the underlying hardware infrastructure. This helped improve server utilization, efficiency, and provisioning speed. The next step towards an even greater level of abstraction is the move to a software-defined infrastructure (SDI), including compute, storage and networking.

Review: openSUSE Leap 15.1

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Reviews
SUSE

openSUSE is one of those distros I have always been interested in but which I had never used for more than a few hours. Recently the project released Leap 15.1, which was a good enough reason to give the distro a proper spin.

The distro hardly needs an introduction. It is a community project sponsored by SUSE, one of the larger commercial Linux vendors. openSUSE maintains two distros: Tumbleweed is a rolling release distro and upstream to SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE). Leap is a stable (non-rolling) distro that is downstream to SLE. A new version of Leap is released roughly once a year, and each version is supported for 18 months. The Leap 15.x series as a whole is supported for three years.

openSUSE is probably best known for the Btrfs file system, Snapper and YaST. As Leap 15.1 is a relatively small, conservative upgrade from 15.0 I will mainly focus on these features. I will also have a look at where things may be heading.

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People of openSUSE: Stasiek Michalski

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I’ve been using computers for as long as I can remember, playing Solitaire, The Settlers, and other simple DOS games, because that’s what my parents and grandma liked to play. I started with Win95, 98, and 2000, before learning about Linux.

My interest in design was sparked by the original iPhone icons, which I loved. In contrast with my hatred toward the Faenza icon theme, both have fairly similar style yet widely different results. That’s how I began exploring and learned from there.

Correspondingly, my Linux journey started back in 2007 when my dad showed me Ubuntu, and just like what I did with Windows 2000 before, my pastime became installing and reinstalling Linux alongside Windows in different configurations (I apparently was consumed by the concept of installation and configuration, which might explain my YaST obsession?).

Later in 2010, I had a tough time with a machine that wouldn’t take any distro with the exception of openSUSE (although it did end up with a few Linuxrc errors). Besides, I really liked its GNOME 2 config back then; it was really user friendly yet powerful. I gave KDE a shot but to this day I never really liked it.

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Mesa, VirtualBox, Ceph, NetworkManager Packages Update in Tumbleweed

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SUSE

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots have been released in the first four days of June, which bring several minor package updates to the rolling release.

The 20190604 snapshot brought babl 0.1.64, which provided some code consistency, gitlab Continuous Integration (CI), autotools and meson build improvements. An accident in naming caused the 0.3.2 version of bubblewrap to become version 0.3.3. However, bubblewrap 0.3.3. did address a Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE), provided a few smaller fixes and added the JSON Application Programming Interface (API) that allows reading the inner process exit code. GNU Compiler Collection 8 had some updates that included a couple patches with one that makes builds without profiling reproducible. Generic Graphics Library gegl 0.4.16 also added gitlab CI and uses a custom allocator for tile data, which aligns data and groups allocations in blocks; this was achieved on Linux by using the GNU extension malloc_trim to permit forcing invocation of the glibc malloc/free allocators garbage collection function. Oracle’ virtualbox 6.0.8 had a minor maintenance release that fixed a crash when powering off a Virtual Machine without a graphics controller and xorg-x11-server 1.20.5 fixed some input. The snapshot is currently trending at a 96 rating, according to the snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190603 updated Mesa and Mesa-drivers to version 19.0.5 and took care of some core code and drivers. NetworkManager 1.16.2 fixed some wrong permissions of the /var/lib/NetworkManager/secret_key file. Ceph’s minor version update disabled Link Time Optimisation in spec when being used. GNOME 3.32.2 had several package updates and fixes including the fix of a regression that caused the fonts category to go missing. Tumbleweed skipped over the 1.3.0 series of Flatpak directly to version 1.4.0. The major changes since 1.2.4 is the improved I/O use for system-installed applications, and the new format for pre-configured remotes. Glib2 2.60.3 updated translations and provided various fixes to small key/value support in GHashTable. Scripting language php7 7.3.6 added a missing curl_version and fixed several other bugs. The snapshot is currently trending at a 95 rating, according to the snapshot reviewer.

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Android Leftovers

Linux on the mainframe: Then and now

Last week, I introduced you to the origins of the mainframe's origins from a community perspective. Let's continue our journey, picking up at the end of 1999, which is when IBM got onboard with Linux on the mainframe (IBM Z). These patches weren't part of the mainline Linux kernel yet, but they did get Linux running on z/VM (Virtual Machine for IBM Z), for anyone who was interested. Several efforts followed, including the first Linux distro—put together out of Marist College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., and Think Blue Linux by Millenux in Germany. The first real commercial distribution came from SUSE on October 31, 2000; this is notable in SUSE history because the first edition of what is now known as SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLES) is that S/390 port. Drawing again from Wikipedia, the SUSE Enterprise Linux page explains: Read more

OSS: Cisco Openwashing, GitLab Funding, Amazon Openwashing, Chrome OS Talk and More Talks

  • Why Open Source continues to be the foundation for modern IT

    Open source technology is no longer an outlier in the modern world, it's the foundation for development and collaboration. Sitting at the base of the open source movement is the Linux Foundation, which despite having the name Linux in its title, is about much more than just Linux and today is comprised of multiple foundations, each seeking to advance open source technology and development processes. At the recent Open Source Summit North America event held in San Diego, the width and breadth of open source was discussed ranging from gaming to networking, to the movie business ,to initiatives that can literally help save humanity. "The cool thing is that no matter whether it's networking, Linux kernel projects, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation projects like Kubernetes, or the film industry with the Academy Software Foundation (ASWF), you know open source is really pushing innovation beyond software and into all sorts of different areas," Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation said during his keynote address.

  • GitLab Inhales $268M Series E, Valuation Hits $2.75B

    GitLab raised a substantial $268 million in a Series E funding round that was more than doubled what the firm had raised across all of its previous funding rounds and pushed its valuation to $2.75 billion. It also bolsters the company’s coffers as it battles in an increasingly competitive DevOps space. GitLab CEO Sid Sijbrandij said in an email to SDxCentral that the new Series E funds will help the company continue to move on its goal of providing a single application to support quicker delivery of software. It claims more than 100,000 organizations use its platform. “These funds will help us to keep up with that pace and add to that with our company engineers,” Sijbrandij explained. “We need to make sure every part of GitLab is great and that CIOs and CTOs who supply the tools for their teams know that if they bet on GitLab that we’ll stand up to their expectations.”

  • Amazon open-sources its Topical Chat data set of over 4.7 million words [Ed: openwashing of listening devices without even releasing any code]
  • How Chrome OS works upstream

    Google has a long and interesting history contributing to the upstream Linux kernel. With Chrome OS, Google has tried to learn from some of the mistakes of its past and is now working with the upstream Linux kernel as much as it can. In a session at the 2019 Open Source Summit North America, Google software engineer Doug Anderson detailed how and why Chrome OS developers work upstream. It is an effort intended to help the Linux community as well as Google. The Chrome OS kernel is at the core of Google's Chromebook devices, and is based on a Linux long-term support (LTS) kernel. Anderson explained that Google picks an LTS kernel every year and all devices produced in that year will use the selected kernel. At least once during a device's lifetime, Google expects to be able to "uprev" (switch to a newer kernel version). Anderson emphasized that if Google didn't upstream its own patches from the Chrome OS kernel, it would make the uprev process substantially more difficult. Simply saying that you'll work upstream and actually working upstream can be two different things. The process by which Chrome OS developers get their patches upstream is similar to how any other patches land in the mainline Linux kernel. What is a bit interesting is the organizational structure and process of how Google has tasked Chrome OS developers to work with upstream. Anderson explained that developers need to submit patches to the kernel mailing list and then be a little patient, giving some time for upstream to respond. A key challenge, however, is when there is no response from upstream. "When developing an upstream-first culture, the biggest problem anyone can face is silence," Anderson said. Anderson emphasized that when submitting a patch to the mailing list, what a developer is looking for is some kind of feedback; whether it's good or bad doesn't matter, but it does matter that someone cares enough to review it. What the Chrome OS team does in the event that there is no community review is it will have other Chrome OS engineers publicly review the patch. The risk and worry of having Chrome OS engineers comment on Chrome OS patches is that the whole process might look a little scripted and there could be the perception of some bias as well. Anderson noted that it is important that only honest feedback and review is given for a patch.

  • Open Source Builds Trust & Credibility | Karyl Fowler

    Karyl Fowler is co-founder and CEO of Transmute, a company that’s building open source and decentralized identity management. We sat down with Fowler at the Oracle OpenWorld conference to talk about the work Transmute is doing.

  • What Is Infrastructure As Code?

    Rob Hirschfeld, Founder, and CEO of RackN breaks Infrastructure As Code (IaC) into six core concepts so users have a better understanding of it.

  • Everything You Need To Know About Redis Labs

    At the Oracle OpenWorld conference, we sat down with Kyle Davis – Head of Developer Advocacy at Redis Labs – to better understand what the company does.

Programming: Java, Python, and Perl

  • Oracle Releases Java 13 with Remarkable New Features

    Oracle – the software giant has released Java SE and JDK 13 along with the promise to introduce more new features in the future within the six-month cycle. The Java 13’s binaries are now available for download with improvements in security, performance, stability, and two new additional preview features ‘Switch Expressions’ and ‘Text Blocks’, specifically designed to boost developers’ productivity level. This gives the hope that the battle of Java vs Python will be won by the former. Remarking on the new release, Oracle said: “Oracle JDK 13 increases developer productivity by improving the performance, stability and security of the Java SE Platform and the JDK,”. [...] Speaking of the Java 13 release, it is licensed under the GNU General Public License v2 along with the Classpath Exception (GPLv2+CPE). The director of Oracle’s Java SE Product Management, Sharat Chander stated “Oracle offers Java 13 for enterprises and developers. JDK 13 will receive a minimum of two updates, per the Oracle CPU schedule, before being followed by Oracle JDK 14, which is due out in March 2020, with early access builds already available.” Let’s look into the new features that JDK 13 comes packed with.

  • 8 Python GUI Frameworks For Developers

    Graphical User Interfaces make human-machine interactions easier as well as intuitive. It plays a crucial role as the world is shifting.

  • What's In A Name? Tales Of Python, Perl, And The GIMP

    In the older days of open source software, major projects tended to have their Benevolent Dictators For Life who made all the final decisions, and some mature projects still operate that way. Guido van Rossum famously called his language “Python” because he liked the British comics of the same name. That’s the sort of thing that only a single developer can get away with. However, in these modern times of GitHub, GitLab, and other collaboration platforms, community-driven decision making has become a more and more common phenomenon, shifting software development towards democracy. People begin to think of themselves as “Python programmers” or “GIMP users” and the name of the project fuses irrevocably with their identity. What happens when software projects fork, develop apart, or otherwise change significantly? Obviously, to prevent confusion, they get a new name, and all of those “Perl Monks” need to become “Raku Monks”. Needless to say, what should be a trivial detail — what we’ve all decided to call this pile of ones and zeros or language constructs — can become a big deal. Don’t believe us? Here are the stories of renaming Python, Perl, and the GIMP.

  • How to teach (yourself) computer programming

    Many fellow students are likely in the same boat, the only difference being that the vast majority not only that don’t list computer science as one of their passions (but more as one of their reasons for not wanting to live anymore), but they get a very distorted view of what computer science and programming actually is.

    Said CS classes tend to be kind of a joke, not only because of the curriculum. The main reason why they are bad and boring is the way they are taught. I am going to address my main frustrations on this matter together with proposed solutions and a guide for those who want to start learning alone.

  • [Old] Perl Is Still The Goddess For Text Manipulation

    You heard me. Freedom is the word here with Perl.

    When I’m coding freely at home on my fun data science project, I rely on it to clean up my data.

    In the real world, data is often collected with loads of variations. Unless you are using someone’s “clean” dataset, you better learn to clean that data real fast.

    Yes, Perl is fast. It’s lightening fast.