Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Receive Important Mesa Linux Graphics Stack Update

Filed under
SUSE

Four snapshots were released this week for OpenSuSE Tumbleweed, which is a rolling release GNU/Linux distribution where users install once and receive updates forever. Probably the most important change added in these snapshots was related to the graphics stack, which was updated to Mesa 17.3.2, a release that neede to be split into two parts to improve the build performance of the distribution.

"In order to improve the distro build performance, Mesa was split into two parts to be built. Users that updated their system using “–no-recommends” did not get Mesa-dri auto-installed, resulting in the graphical system possibly not starting up. Simply install Mesa-dri for now manually (dependency chain fixes are underway)," said Dominique Leuenberger in the mailing list announcement.

Read more

Tumbleweed Update

Filed under
SUSE
  • Tumbleweed Rolls Forward with New versions of Mesa, Squid, Xen

    This week provided a pretty healthy amount of package updates for openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed.

    There were three snapshots released since the last blog and some of the top packages highlighted this week are from Mesa, Squid, Xen and OpenSSH.

    The Mesa update from version 17.2.6 to 17.3.2 in snapshot 20180116 provided multiple fixes in the RADV Vulkan driver and improvements of the GLSL shader cache. The Linux Kernel provides some fixes for the security vulnerabilities of Meltdown in version 4.14.13 and added a prevent buffer overrun on memory hotplug during migration for KVM with s390. The snapshot had many more package updates like openssh 7.6p1, which tightened configuration access rights. A critical fix when updating Flatpak packages live was made with the gnome-software version 3.26.4 update. File systems package btrfsprogs 4.14.1 provided cleanups and some refactoring while wireshark 2.4.4 made some fixes for dissector crashes. Xen 4.10.0_10 added a few patches. Rounding out the snapshot, ModemManager 1.6.12 fixed connection state machine when built against libqmi and blacklisted a few devices to include some Pycom devices.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Rolls To Mesa 17.3, Linux 4.14.13

    OpenSUSE has continued rolling in the new year with several key package updates in January.

    Exciting us a lot is that openSUSE Tumbleweed has migrated from Mesa 17.2 to now Mesa 17.3. Mesa 17.3.2 is the version currently in openSUSE's rolling-release.

SUSE: Change of Plans and Disclosure

Filed under
SUSE
  • SUSE Dropping Mainline Work On Their In-Kernel Bootsplash System

    For those that were excited over the months of ongoing work by SUSE to bring up an in-kernel boot splash system that could be better than Plymouth for at least some use-cases and was interesting many readers, unfortunately it's not panning out for mainline.

    Max Staudt who has been leading this project has sent out his latest version of the patches today, but he's decided to drop pursuing it for mainline. The German Linux developer commented, "found that it doesn't currently make sense to continue working on the splash code, given the low practical interest I've received on LKML...I'll be happy to rebase it and continue to work on it if interest arises."

  • cPanel Provides Project with Network Cards

    The hosting platform cPanel has provided the openSUSE Project with two new network cards to assist the project with its infrastructure needs.

    The network cards will soon be integrated into the openSUSE infrastructure to improve the Open Build Service.

SUSE: GCC and GSoC in OpenSUSE/SLES

Filed under
Google
SUSE
  • SLES 12 Toolchain Update Brings new Developer Tools
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Updates Its Developer Toolchain to GCC 7

    SUSE's Andreas Jaeger writes in a blog post about the updated toolchain of the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 operating system and the new developer tools it brings.

    The article notes the fact that with the release of GNU Compiler Collection 7, the GCC team brought numerous improvements for developers, including better diagnostics, DWARF 5 support, as well as support for the C++ 17 standard.

    GCC 7 also contains improved optimization passes and takes advantage of some of the features of modern processors, and now it is available to all SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 customers with an active subscription.

  • Become a Google Summer of Code Mentor for openSUSE

    The application period for organizations wanting to participate in the Google Summer of Code is now and the openSUSE project is once again looking for mentors who are willing to put forth projects to mentor GSoC students.

openSUSE-Based GeckoLinux Receives New, Revamped Releases Built with KIWI

Filed under
SUSE

The biggest change of the new GeckoLinux releases is that they are now built using the KIWI OS image builder instead of the older SUSE Studio, which was merged into SUSE's OBS (Open Build Service) last year. This gives GeckoLinux a smoother and more reliable boot process, better hardware detections, and boot splash screen support.

Additionally, this major change no longer forces users to enter passwords for the default live session user account, provides a much cleaner ISO build process and structure that's up-to-date with OpenSuSE's standards, and introduces persistence support for Live USBs, allowing users to run GeckoLinux as a portable OS.

Read more

Future Tumbleweed Snapshot to Bring YaST Changes

Filed under
SUSE

Changes to YaST are coming and people using openSUSE Tumbleweed will be the first to experience these planned changes in a snapshot that is expected to be released soon.

Those following the YaST Team blog may have been read about the implementation changes expected for libstorage-ng, which have been discussed for nearly two years. Libstorage is the component used by YaST; specially used in the installer, the partitioner and AutoYaST to access disks, partitions, LVM volumes and more.

This relatively low-level component has been a constant source of headaches for YaST developers for years, but all that effort is about to bear fruit. The original design has fundamental flaws that limited YaST in many ways and the YaST Team have been working to write a replacement for it: the libstorage-ng era has begun.

This document offers an incomplete but very illustrative view of the new things that libstorage-ng will allow in the future and the libstorage limitations it will allow to leave behind. For example, it already makes possible to install a fully encrypted system with no LVM using the automatic proposal and to handle much better filesystems placed directly on a disk without any partitioning. In the short future, it will allow to fully manage Btrfs multi-device filesystems, bcache and many other technologies that were impossible to accommodate into the old system.

Read more

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get KDE Applications 17.12, LLVM 5, and Other Goodies

Filed under
SUSE

It would appear that a total of four snapshots were released between December 15 and December 21, snapshot 20171220 being the last one available for OpenSuSE Tumbleweed. And they include a few interesting things, such as the massive KDE Application 17.12.0 software suite for KDE Plasma 5 users.

When the KDE Applications 17.12.0 packages arrived in the Tumbleweed repositories, they included a bug for the KMail email client that couldn't send out email over secure SMTP connections. However, the openSUSE Tumbleweed was quick to release a fix for this issue in the update channel.

Read more

SUSE: Etisalat Digital, OrionVM, Boot Splash Screen

Filed under
SUSE
  • Etisalat Digital to add SUSE open source solutions

    Etisalat Digital is to add Linux and open source solutions to its managed services mix after signing a partnership to on-board SUSE solutions.

  • OrionVM Broadens Cloud Offering with Open Source Enterprise Support Partner SUSE

    OrionVM, an award-winning next-gen Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) provider, today announced continued growth of the OrionVM Wholesale Cloud Platform with the addition of technology partner SUSE, the world’s first provider of an Enterprise Linux Distribution. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server represents the first open source enterprise supported Linux operating system on the OrionVM platform.

  • SUSE Rolls Out New Version Of Their In-Kernel Boot Splash Screen

    Back in October I wrote about SUSE working on a new, in-kernel bootsplash project. That work has yet to be mainlined but it looks like it's still on track for going upstream in the future with the latest version now being released that addresses issues uncovered during review.

    SUSE is developing this in-kernel bootsplash program as an alternative to the user-space Plymouth and other programs. SUSE's implementation runs off the FBCON frame-buffer console rather than DRM/KMS and they hope with it being in the kernel will prove to be more reliable. This in-kernel bootsplash can also allow hiding all kernel output and other differences compared to user-space implementations.

GeckoLinux Brings Flexibility and Choice to openSUSE

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

If you’re looking for an excuse to venture back into the realm of openSUSE, GeckoLinux might be a good reason. It’s slightly better looking, lighter weight, and with similar performance. It’s not perfect and, chances are, it won’t steal you away from your distribution of choice, but GeckoLinux is a solid entry in the realm of Linux desktops.

Read more

Announcing Tumbleweed Snapshots

Filed under
SUSE

Some of you may remember over a year ago when I proposed the concept of
Tumbleweed Snapshots [1] and later the prototype that I provided [2]. Today I
would like to announce hosting for the snapshots, that is not inside my house
Smile, and ready to use!

For those not familiar with the concept I will describe it in the form to which
it has evolved.

Tumbleweed, being a rolling distribution, is constantly changing and packages
are constantly being rebuilt against one another and updating requirements. As
such it becomes necessary to update even when undesirable. For example, one is
running snapshot 17 and the next day snapshot 18 contains a QT update that
rebuilt a large number of packages. When attempting to install an application
that depends on QT one is greeted with an ugly unresolveable error. It is then
necessary to run a full update, likely very large with many unrelated changes,
in order to simply install an application as would have been possible yesterday.

Read more

Also: OpenSUSE Rolls Out Tumbleweed Snapshots

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Making GNOME Look Like Apple's Operating System

  • A macOS Mojave Inspired GTK Theme Appears
    A new GTK theme brings the luscious look of macOS Mojave to the Linux desktop. Not that you should be surprised; we’ve written before about how easy it is to make Ubuntu look like a Mac. But thanks to this new macOS Mojave inspired GTK theme that fact is truer, and more faithful, than ever.
  • Make Ubuntu Look Like macOS Mojave’s Dark Mode
    If you’re a Linux user who likes the look of the dark mode coming in macOS Mojave, you’re in luck: there’s a GTK theme just for you. The theme is available on Gnome-Look.org alongside several other macOS inspired themes. You’re looking for the one titled McOS-MJV-Dark-mode, but feel free to download more if you think you might want to switch it up later. Installing is a little tricky: you need to create a .themes directory in your home folder, then extract the folder in the downloaded archive into that folder. Next you need to install Gnome Tweaks in the Ubuntu Software Store, which you can use to change the theme. You can also use Gnome Tweaks to move the buttons to the left side of the window, where they belong. Fight me.

Android Leftovers

Servers With GNU/Linux

  • Linux Foundation Shifts Network Infrastructure to Kubernetes
    The Linux Networking Fund (LNF) is making significant progress toward embracing Kubernetes as a platform for delivering a range of networking services that are expected to be widely embraced by telecommunications carriers and cloud service providers (CSP). Arpit Joshipura, general manager of networking an orchestration for The Linux Foundation, says the latest Beijing release of the Open Networking Automation Platform (ONAP) contains several modules that have been ported to Kubernetes, with more to follow once the Casablanca release of ONAP is released.
  • A Platform Of A Certain Age And Respectability
    But seriously. The many rivals of the OS/400 platform and its follow-ons since that June 21, 1988, launch of the Application System/400 are now gone or not even on life support. We can all rattle them off, but the important ones that drove innovation for OS/400 and its children through to the current IBM i are DEC’s VMS for the VAX and Alpha systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise’s MPE for the HP 3000 and HP-UX for the HP 9000s, and Sun Microsystems’ Solaris for the Sparc systems. You could throw in SCO Unix, Novell NetWare, and a slew of proprietary operating systems in Europe and Japan, and while you are at it, you should probably also include the IBM System/38’s CPF operating system and the IBM System/36’s SSP operating system. Even OS/2 and its PS/2 platform actually predate the AS/400 by 10 months – and they are long, long gone.
  • Uptycs Raises $13M, Launches Osquery-Based Security Platform
    No. 2 is the growing popularity of Mac and Linux-based infrastructure. Traditional enterprise workloads are deployed on Windows, so that’s where malicious activity historically occurred. But now more companies are using Mac infrastructure and transitioning new workloads to Linux in the cloud. Companies need to monitor and secure these environments as well, and Uptycs’ security platform covers all of the above.
  • CeBIT 2018: Huawei to roll-out KunLun V5 server
    Huawei is set to launch the latest server in its KunLun mission critical range with the V5, teaming up once more with Suse, further confirming that the company’s Linux Enterprise Server system is its preferred standard for the range.
  • Why an Infrastructure Transition is the Perfect Time to Invest in Security
    The idea behind containers has been around since the 1970s, when the technology was first used to isolate application code on Unix systems. However, the use of containers only became widespread in 2013 with the advent of Docker, and container orchestration tools like Kubernetes are even newer than that.

A look at Lutris – Open Gaming Platform for GNU/Linux

Lutris is quite the handy application I’ve discovered, that helps with organization and installation of games on GNU/Linux, even if they come from multiple sources. One of the project's goals is to support any game that runs on Linux regardless of whether it runs natively, through Wine, or other means. The main appeal of Lutris is that it provides an interface to manage all games installed on the machine regardless of source. While it is necessary to integrate the games in the application first, doing so is not super complicated. You may add local games right away by selecting them from the local system or visit the Lutris website to add games this way. Lutris simplifies nearly everything. Users can visit the list of support games on the Lutris website, choose to download and install the game (Note: If its a game that must be bought, you must own it first.) The website lists supported games and where you can acquire or download them. You can use filters on the site to display only free games, games of a genre, or use the built-in search to find games of interest quickly using it. Read more