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SUSE/OpenSUSE: Upcoming openSUSE Leap Release, YaST Development Sprint and SUSE Cloud Application Platform 2.0

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SUSE
  • Celebrate The Upcoming openSUSE Leap Release

    Having a party to celebrate an achievement is rewarding and the openSUSE community knows how to party; and get things done. This is no exception during the time of the pandemic.

    A release party is in order for the general availability of openSUSE Leap 15.2. Celebrate the release the way you like and while doing so help promote the release.

    openSUSE members can join and/or create a room to hang out with other members of the community to celebrate the release. There are already a couple planned for July 2. Just visit the launch party wiki and select or add a release party. While this list is mostly virtual, some people might be close enough to meet up for a physical party. In which case, they should add it to the list. People can also get creative make the parties purposeful like creating one room as a social media posting party.

  • Digest of YaST Development Sprint 102

    It’s time for another development digest from The YaST team. As you can see in the following list of highlights, the range of topics is as broad as usual.

  • SUSE Cloud Application Platform 2.0 Accelerates Software Production to Increase Business Agility

    Every software expert and business leader I speak with conveys the importance of delivering meaningful software projects that accelerates the pace of innovation. Today SUSE announces the availability of SUSE Cloud Application Platform 2.0 to support those efforts. Providing full application lifecycle automation, the platform enables enterprises to shrink release cycles from months to minutes, which in turn enables them to continuously improve customer experiences and dramatically increase the agility of their business.

    A new Kubernetes Operator in this release enables easier deployment and management of the Cloud Foundry-based platform on Kubernetes infrastructure. This 2.0 release is also simpler to install, operate and maintain on Kubernetes platforms anywhere – on premises and in public clouds. It also opens an accelerated and pragmatic path for existing Cloud Foundry users to transition to a modern, Kubernetes-based architecture.

openSUSE Leap 15.2 Release Roadmap And All New Features

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SUSE

SUSE is an open-source company that sponsors the community-supported openSUSE project, which develops popular openSUSE Linux distribution. openSUSE further offers two OS editions: Tumbleweed and Leap.

openSUSE Tumbleweed is a rolling release distribution that has a lifetime of ‘forever.’ Meanwhile, Leap gets a fixed lifetime following a regular release model. In this article, I’ll discuss everything about the upcoming stable release of openSUSE Leap 15.2 based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 2.

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KDE Partition Manager on openSUSE

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SUSE

I have become quite the fan of Gparted over the years of my Linux life and I started wondering if there were other partition management options out there. Specifically one that is Qt based instead. This is not a light on GTK based applications, I just find that they don’t tend to look as nice and clean as Qt apps. In this off-hand search, I stumbled upon PartitionManger which is in official openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap Repositories.

I should note, they both Gparted and KDE Partition Manager use the same icon.

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Also: Help promote openSUSE Leap "15.2"!

KDE Plasma 5.19 on openSUSE Tumbleweed

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It was not so long ago that Plasma 5.18 graced my computer and very excitingly, 5.19 is here now. Since Tumbleweed is my main Linux system I use, I decided to share my experience on openSUSE Tumbleweed but it should be noted that you can enjoy Plasma 5.19 on Leap as well using the backports repositories. Leap is not my preferred method but it is an option.

Bottom Line Up Front: It is another fantastic release with much attention being made to the finer details that enhance the usability experience without taking away from any of its functionality.

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UbuntuDDE | Review from an openSUSE User

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Reviews
SUSE
Ubuntu

UbuntuDDE is a satisfactory Desktop Environment. Would I say it is the most beautiful? No, not a chance. I think it is fine though. What bothers me most about it is the very limiting feeling I get from it. I don’t feel attached to the desktop. I don’t feel like it is mine and things like not all applications respecting the dark theme just added more to that pile.

Despite my experience with the desktop. I think you should give it a try, in a VM or on actual hardware. After all, your experience may be far different than mine. It could be all roses and puppy dogs or maybe Kawaii cats hiding and appearing. After all, I am a biased openSUSE Plasma user that wants his bacon fried to a certain perfection. My tastes are different than yours so you should explore and find your Desktop Home.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed on an HP Zbook 15 G2 with Nvidia Quadro K2100M

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Outside of the Nvidia issue, which I may have eventually worked out if I had the time or the inclination, openSUSE Tumbleweed with the Plasma desktop was a nice experience. At least, far nicer than the Windows 7 experience and now that I am thinking of it. The graphics drivers on Windows were wonkey too. I often had to reboot the machine to clear things up. So, it is possible there may be something not quite right with the hardware. It is also possible the keyboard may have been abused before I obtained it so that might account for the poor keyboard performance too.

If I had more time, I would have probably tried a few more distros on it. Leap being one and Pop_!OS being the other. Just to see if the Nvidia issue was a hardware thing. Would I ever buy this machine for myself? Nope. Lots of little things I don’t like about it, really. I would call it an “almost” machine. Everything about it is almost great but just happens to fall short in a lot of areas.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/24

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Another week has passed. There have been a few technical issues around the publishing of our snapshots. Two were flagged for release, but actually never made it to the mirrors. Turned out, kiwi renamed some of the live-images from *-i686-* to *-ix86-*. But nothing else knew about it. As we even have links on the web pointing to those image names, we opted to revert to the original name. So, due to this, we only release 3 snapshots (0604, 0609, and 0610; 0609 contained the changes of 0605 and 0607 – the ones that got not synced out).

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SUSE: Clown Computing, GNU/Linux Promotion and YaST Development Sprint 101

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  • SUSE High Availability on GCP – New Foundational Stack

    When it comes to the SUSE High Availability Extension (HAE) implementation in the Public Cloud, the two challenges we have are related to how to implement the Fencing Agent and the Floating IP resource agent functions. Each Cloud Service Provider (CSP) has its own way to implement that, which is different than the on-premises SUSE HAE implementation.

  • The rise of Linux popularity

    Kathy Gibson reports from a SUSE/SAB&T TEC webinar – Linux is seeing a huge surge in popularity – which is not surprising when you consider the various features offered by the operating system.
    Tinus Brink, director of consulting at SAB&T TEC, points out that Linux is free, which is a good part of the reason for its popularity.

    It is also open source by nature and the source code can be changed to fit your needs.

  • Moving to Linux is easier than you think

    Among the enhancements that have been made to the operating system of late are more user friendly user interfaces.
    The Gnome interface is native to Linux, Brink points out. “It is easy to use and quick.”
    If users want to use other interfaces, they can install multiple themes for front-end computers using KDE, LXQt, XFCE and others that emulate a Windows operating system.
    Deepin, Pantheon and Budgie can be downloaded to run a MacOS-like front-end.

  • Digest of YaST Development Sprint 101

    As explained in our previous blog post, this YaST development report is presented as a collection of links to rather descriptive Github’s pull requests. With that, our readers can deep into the particular topics they find interesting.

SUSE Condemns US Government and Promotes SUSE Enterprise Storage 7

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SUSE
  • A time of reflection and standing together

    Like many of you, I have found the events occurring across the United States in response to the unconscionable killings of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor, amongst many others, to be profoundly tragic and painful. Personally, they have shaken me to my core and have left me in deep reflection. While I will never understand the struggle of millions of people around the world that have been subject to systemic oppression, I stand united against hate and discrimination.
    As these events continue to unfold across the United States, they have rightly grabbed the world’s attention, and as leader of a global company, SUSE cannot remain silent – we will not remain silent. We will not accept racism, discrimination, or harassment in any form at any time. We stand against the innocent lives lost.

  • Staying Out of Trouble with SUSE Enterprise Storage 7

    Do you ever wake up in the morning and think, “I wish there was somewhere that stored common troubleshooting problems for SUSE Enterprise Storage 7?”

SUSE: Mainframe at Home, INNOVATORS Project and YaST Development Sprints 99 and 100

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  • Developing Software for Linux on Mainframe at Home

    When developing for architectures that are not mainstream, developers often have challenges to get access to current systems that allow to work on a specific software. Especially when asking to fix an issue that shows up only on big endian hardware, the answer I repeatedly get is, that it’s hard to get access to an appropriate machine.

    I just recently saw reports that told that the qemu project made substantial progress with supporting more current Mainframe hardware. Thus I thought, how hard could it be to create a virtual machine that allows to develop for s390x on local workstation hardware.

    It turned out to be much easier than I thought. First, I did a standard install of tumbleweed for s390x, which went quite easy. But then I remembered that also the OBS supports emulators, and specifically qemu to run virtual machines.

  • openSUSE for INNOVATORS Project is born

    It is with great enthusiasm that I announce the INNOVATORS for openSUSE project, is an initiative to share projects, articles and news about innovative projects on the openSUSE platform developed by the community and public and private companies.

    All information on this wiki is related to innovative projects that use augmented reality technology, artificial intelligence, computer vision, robotics, virtual assistants and any and all innovative technology (in all hardware plataforms ).

  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprints 99 and 100

    One hundred development sprints, that’s a nice rounded number… and a good moment to rethink the way we write and publish our reports.

    Yes, you read it right. This post will be the last one following our traditional format, assuming something can already be called “traditional” after four and a half years. As we will explain at the end of this post, subsequent reports will look more as a digest with links to information and not that much as a traditional blog post that tries to tell a story.

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