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SUSE

Open-spec networking Mini-ITX has 1, 2.5, and 10 GbE ports

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Linux
SUSE

SolidRun’s “Marvell MacchiatoBIN” is a $349, Mini-ITX networking SBC that runs Linux 4.4 on Marvell’s quad -A72 Armada 8040, and supports ODP, OFP, and NFV.

SolidRun, which is known for its NXP i.MX6 based HummingBoard SBCs and Marvell Armada 38x based ClearFog Pro and scaled down ClearFog Base networking boards, has spun a $349 (and up) Marvell MacchiatoBIN SBC that showcases Marvell’s high-end Armada 8040 SoC. The 170 x 170mm “community” Mini-ITX board ships with schematics and layout files, and offers an open source, mainline Linux 4.4x BSP.

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openSUSE Leap's backward version jump

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SUSE

Hi all,

On behalf of the openSUSE Board and Leap Release Management I am
pleased to announce the next version of openSUSE Leap after 42.3 will
be:

openSUSE Leap 15

As with Leap 42.x, minor releases are expected annually for at least 3
years, so you can expect a Leap 15.1 to follow, then 15.2 and onwards.

Obviously this is quite a dramatic change from the current version
number of 42.x, so I will explain what justifies this change in some
detail below.

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openSUSE Leap 15 Will Succeed 42.3

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SUSE

What comes after openSUSE Leap 42.3 for SUSE's community non-rolling distribution? Version 15.

Richard Brown announced on the behalf of the openSUSE Board and Leap Release Manager that the next version after openSUSE Leap 42.3 will be openSUSE Leap 15. Yes, that's after pre-42 was openSUSE 13.2.

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Also: Mailinglist Archive: opensuse-project (15 mails)

Open Build Service Version 2.8 Released

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SUSE

The Build Service Team is happy to announce to release of Open Build Service 2.8! We’ve been hard at work to bring you many new features to the UI, the API and the backend. The UI has undergone several handy improvements including the filtering of the projects list based on a configurable regular expresion and the ability to download a project’s gpg key and ssl certificate (also available via the API). The API has been fine-tuned to allow more control over users including locking or deleting them from projects as well as declaring users to be sub-accounts of other users. The backend now includes new features such as mulibuild - the ability to build multiple jobs from a single source package without needing to create local links. Worker tracking and management has also been enhanced along with the new obsservicedispatch service which handles sources in an asynchronous queue. Published packages can now be removed using the osc unpublish command.

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Newest GNOME, KDE, Kernel Arrive in Tumbleweed

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SUSE

Eighteen openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots brought several new packages to users last month, which included both GNOME 3.24 and KDE Plasma 5.9.4.

GNOME 3.24 received most of the hype in snapshot 20170322, but that release also included Mozilla Firefox’s newest 52.0.1 version, which added support for WebAssembly, an emerging standard that brings near-native performance to Web-based games, apps, and software libraries without the use of plugins.

Closing out the month, snapshot 20170331 brought git 2.12.2 that provided a Command Line Interface output fix and python 3.6.1, which provided some bug fixes and updates to documentation. Ruby 2.2 switched to git-branch based patching and patched an exploitable heap overflow vulnerability for CVE-2016-2339.

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Also: openSUSE Goodies Pack

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu.

I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want.

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Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Huawei and SUSE Announce SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Support for KunLun RAS 2.0

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SUSE
  • Huawei and SUSE Announce SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Support for KunLun RAS 2.0

    Huawei and SUSE have announced SUSE Linux Enterprise Server as the preferred standard operating system (OS) for Huawei’s KunLun RAS 2.0. Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack 2, the OS supports the unique Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability (RAS 2.0) features of Huawei’s KunLun Mission Critical Server.

    The RAS 2.0 features enable customers to add or remove CPU and memory resources without shutting down the system. These features combine to make KunLun ‘Always Online’. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server provides broad support for mission-critical workloads such as databases and middleware.

  • Huawei and SUSE Announce SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Support for KunLun RAS 2.0

    Huawei and SUSE today announced SUSE Linux Enterprise Server as the preferred standard operating system (OS) for Huawei's KunLun RAS 2.0. Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack 2, the OS supports the unique Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability (RAS 2.0) features of Huawei's KunLun Mission Critical Server. The RAS 2.0 features enable customers to add or remove CPU and memory resources without shutting down the system. These features combine to make KunLun "Always Online." SUSE Linux Enterprise Server provides broad support for mission-critical workloads such as databases and middleware.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Linux Kernel 4.10.3, GNOME 3.24 Coming Soon

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SUSE

Dominique Leuenberger from the openSUSE Project is informing the Tumbleweed community about the latest updates brought by a total of five snapshots during the week that passed.

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SUSE acquires HPE's cloud assets

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SUSE

HPE and SUSE, a top Linux distributor, have a complex relationship. First, HPE spun and merged its non-core software assets with Micro Focus. Micro Focus owns SUSE, a major Linux provider. Now, SUSE has finished acquiring cloud assets of HPE's OpenStack Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS), Cloud Foundry Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS), and Stackato, HPE's Cloud Foundry implementation.

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SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • Rolling to Leap 42.3

    The bits and pieces needed for a rolling development phase of Leap 42.3 are now up and running!

  • OpenSUSE Leap 42.3 Will Be Developed In A Rolling Manner

    Ubuntu dropped their official alpha/betas long ago, Fedora 27 is dropping their alphas, and openSUSE is also shifting their development approach and will get rid of alpha and beta releases. OpenSUSE Leap 42.3 will be developed in a "rolling" manner although the release will not be a rolling-release post-release, unlike openSUSE Tumbleweed.

  • YaST development during Hack Week 15

    During this Hack Week, some of our team members invested quite some time working in YaST related projects. But, what’s even better, some people from outside the team worked also in YaST projects. Thank you guys!

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Today in Techrights

Android Leftovers

GNU/Linux on Desktop/Phone: System76, DeX, Librem

  • Pop!_OS Is Finally Here — System76’s Ubuntu-based Operating System For Developers
    The first ever stable release of Pop!_OS is finally here. You can go ahead and download it from this link. Don’t forget to share your feedback. Earlier this year in June, we reported that System76 is creating its own Linux distro called Pop!_OS.
  • Samsung DeX Promises to Bring the Linux PC Experience to Your Mobile Device
    After unveiling its next-generation Bixby 2.0 intelligent assistant, Samsung today announced that it plans to bring the Linux PC experience to the Samsung DeX ecosystem.
  • Steps toward a privacy-preserving phone
    What kind of cell phone would emerge from a concerted effort to design privacy in from the beginning, using free software as much as possible? Some answers are provided by a crowdfunding campaign launched in August by Purism SPC, which has used two such campaigns successfully in the past to build a business around secure laptops. The Librem 5, with a five-inch screen and radio chip for communicating with cell phone companies, represents Purism's hope to bring the same privacy-enhancing vision to the mobile space, which is much more demanding in its threats, technology components, and user experience. The abuse of mobile phone data has become a matter of worldwide concern. The capture and sale of personal data by apps is so notorious that it has been covered in USA Today; concerns over snooping contribute to the appeal of WhatsApp (which has topped 1.3 billion users) and other encrypted and privacy-conscious apps. But apps are only one attack vector. I got in touch with Todd Weaver, founder and CEO of Purism, to find out what the company is doing to plug the leaks in mobile devices.

Servers: DockerCon Coverage, MongoDB IPO

  • DockerCon EU 17 Panel Debates Docker Container Security
    There are many different security capabilities that are part of the Docker container platform, and there are a number of vendors providing container security offerings. At the DockerCon EU 17 conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, eWEEK moderated a panel of leading vendors—Docker, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Aqua Security, Twistlock and StackRox—to discuss the state of the market. To date, there have been no publicly disclosed data breaches attributed to container usage or flaws. However, that doesn't mean that organizations using containers have not been attacked. In fact, Wei Lien Dang, product manager at StackRox, said one of his firm's financial services customers did have a container-related security incident.
  • DockerCon EU: Tips and Tools for Running Container Workloads on AWS
    Amazon Web Services wants to be a welcome home for developers and organizations looking to deploy containers. At the DockerCon EU conference here, a pair of AWS technical evangelists shared their wisdom on the best ways to benefit from container deployments. The terms microservices and containers are often used interchangeably by people. Abby Fuller, technical evangelist at AWS, provided the definition of microservices coined by Adrian Crockford, VP of Cloud Architecture at AWS and formerly the cloud architect at Netflix.
  • Docker CEO: Embracing Kubernetes Removes Conflict
    Steve Singh has ambitious plans for Docker Inc. that are nothing less than transforming the world of legacy applications into a modern cloud-native approach. Singh was named CEO of Docker on May 2 and hosted his first DockerCon event here Oct. 16-19. The highlight of DockerCon EU was the surprise announcement that Docker is going to support the rival open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system. In a video interview with eWEEK, Singh explained the rationale behind the Kubernetes support and provided insight into his vision for the company he now leads.
  • MongoDB's IPO Beats the Market Out of the Gate
    The folks at MongoDB raised a whole lot of money today in their debut on NASDAQ. Yesterday the open source company announced it was going to be asking $24 a share for the 8 million Class A shares it was letting loose in its IPO, which had some Wall Street investors scratching their heads and wondering if the brains at Mongo were suffering from some kind of undiagnosed damage. Analysts had been estimating an opening price of between $20-22 per share, and on October 6 the company had estimated an opening price in the range of $18-20.