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SUSE

SLE 15 SP2 Schedule an openSUSE Tumbleweed

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SUSE

Tumbleweed Snapshots this week bring Salt 3000, LLVM10, update of TigerVNC

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Since last Thursday, a total of five openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released.

Each snapshot had about between five to 10 packages updated.

The most recent snapshot, 202000414 has a few libraries updated like libgit2 0.28.5, libva 2.7.0 and libva-gl 2.7.0. Several patches and five Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures security fixes were made to the high performance, multi-platform VNC client and serve tigervnc 1.10.1. Midnight Commander (mc) 4.8.24, which is a text-mode full-screen file manager and visual shell, provided new skins and added yabasic (Yet Another BASIC) syntax highlighting. A minor update to plymouth’s 0.9.5 version removed unused kernel-headers and module-init-tools build dependencies and the xfce4-settings 4.14.3 updated translations and modified the display to allow for the use of a proper fallback configuration on “apply” and “toggle off”. The xfwm4 4.14.1 package, which is the window manager for the Xfce environment, fixed hostnames that were not showing initially when running apps remotely and the update fixed a crash with the Graphics Library that involved high CPU usage without a monitor. The snapshot is currently trending stable at a rating of 93, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

A new major version of the Mozilla Firefox browser was released in snapshot 20200413. The new 75.0 version improves the behavior performance on Linux when clicking on the Address Bar and the Search Bar, which now matches other desktop platforms; a single click selects all without primary selection; a double click selects a word; and a triple click selects all with primary selection. Additionally, Firefox is now available in Flatpak and a CVE memory safety bug for Firefox 75 and Firefox ESR 68.7 were fixed. The btrfsprogs package jumped from version 5.4.1 to version 5.6 and supports new hash algorithms in the 5.5 Linux Kernel; the new version also supports LOGICAL_INO_V2 features in logical-resolve. The new option ‘-o’ helps advanced dedupe tools. The libostree 2020.3 library was update in Tumbleweed from it’s previous 2019.6 verion; nine months of updates bring several newer features and fixes like support for making the /sysroot mount pointread-only upon start, and the error-handling around GPG verification was overhauled. Text editor nano 4.9.2 fixed a crash after undoing an at the end of a leading whitespace. The snapshot is currently trending at a moderate 83 rating on the [Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer](https://review.tumbleweed.boombatower.com/).

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SUSE/OpenSUSE: Reasons To Give OpenSUSE A Try and Move to Online Conferencing

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  • Reasons To Give OpenSUSE A Try

    Probably the most special thing about openSUSE is YaST2: The complete control center capable of configuring everything on a Linux system. It comes by default on SUSE & openSUSE distributions. YaST2 is awesome because it contains a lot of options and functionalities.

  • SUSECON Digital – Everything You Hoped For (Except the Guinness)

    For nearly a decade, I have been very fortunate to lead the SUSECON team at SUSE. We have enjoyed double-digit attendance growth every year, and along the way we have made both fans and lifelong friends. Everyone who attends SUSECON comes away with great memories. When asked what the best things about the event were, they reply, “outstanding technical content, open access to subject matter experts, and a true feeling of community.”

    A few weeks ago, for reasons we all know too well, we were presented with a challenge: create an on-line experience that will deliver outstanding technical content, allow for open access to the people who create that content, and still maintain a feeling of community. Since that time, we have been hard at work to create a virtual SUSECON experience that will be as memorable as our live event.

  • Jitsi instance on meet.opensuse.org

    In the times of Covid-19 and the people staying at home it is an adventure to get the tools to work from home without missing the benefits of face-to-face meetings.

    There are a lot of solutions out in the wild. But one promising solution is Jitsi. Until now we used the instances provided by other people.

    But now we are able to introduce:

    Our own Jitsi instance

    It is based on openSUSE Leap 15.1 and uses docker containers to deploy Jitsi. The current security warnings were also considered, furthermore the setup uses secure LDAP and HTTPS.

With coronavirus forcing us to work from home, SUSE suggests the Linux desktop

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GNU
Linux
SUSE

None of the major enterprise Linux companies have been pushing the Linux desktop forward for some time. Their focus for over a decade now has been first on servers, then the cloud, and now, containers and Kubernetes. The Linux desktop has been on the backburner. Even Canonical with its Ubuntu desktop -- perhaps the first name in business Linux desktops these days -- is answering Linux desktop demand and not actually out there marketing it to customers.

The Linux desktop today is driven largely by developers and fans. The most popular Linux desktops, such as MX Linux, Manjaro, and (my own favorite) Linux Mint are community rather than corporate-driven.

But then along came the coronavirus and the sudden rush of people to work from home, and SUSE quickly figured out there was a new, underserved market for the Linux desktop: Companies with little in the way of resources that need to keep their businesses running with what their IT department and users already have at hand.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Available on AWS Marketplace

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  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Available on AWS Marketplace

    openSUSE developer Alessandro de Oliveira Faria announced the availability of the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system on the AWS Marketplace.

    openSUSE, as a GNU/Linux distribution, was already available on the AWS (Amazon Web Services) Marketplace, but as the stable openSUSE Leap release.

    As you probably know already, openSUSE also offers a rolling-release version of its operating system, called openSUSE Tumbleweed.

    And the good news is that, as of this month, you can now install openSUSE Tumbleweed as a Linux server on Amazon AWS, and it’s intended for everyone wants to use the latest openSUSE release.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed available on AWS

    I make openSUSE Tumbleweed available on AWS. The Tumbleweed distribution is a pure rolling release version of openSUSE containing the latest stable versions of all software instead of relying on rigid periodic release cycles. The project does this for users that want the newest stable software.

    Tumbleweed is based on Factory, openSUSE’s main development codebase. Tumbleweed is updated once Factory’s bleeding edge software has been integrated, stabilized and tested. Tumbleweed contains the latest stable applications and is ready and reliable for daily use.

SUSE and Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • SAP Data Intelligence Benefits From Linux And Open Source

    If SAP customers already use Suse Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications (SLES for SAP) in combination with Hana or S/4, they will also want to use Suse solutions in combination with SAP Data Hub and Data Intelligence, as it leads to beneficial technological continuity.

  • SUSE CEO: avoiding disruption with open source and how her focus has changed

    In March 2019, the company become independent from MicroFocus, and today continues to provide all of the open source based operating systems that power the applications of mission critical systems. The open source technology is also embedded inside medical device components like CAT scans and mammogram machines.

    SUSE is led by Melissa Di Donato, former Women in IT Awards winner, who became the company’s first female CEO in July 2019.

    “We are the technology backbone that powers many and most mission critical systems and applications. Coupled with that we’ve got a cloud-based application platform for storage and our Container-as-a-Service business as well,” she told Information Age during a recent interview.

  • A tip to play audio (and video) in a browser

    She uses Fedora on her laptop and Firefox as the browser. All of the online tools that the institution uses works just fine. She is able to share presentations, tabs from browsers showing websites etc. The one challenge she encountered was in playing some audio files that are on her laptop.

    For some reason that online platform is not able to pick up the VLC player that will be playing the audio and shared to her students. Did not matter what audio tool was used (Totem, Audacity (yes, that’s an overkill)), that window was not showing up as being shareable. It could be something to do Wayland being used, but I did not want that to be the issue and that it should work everywhere.

  • Emmanuel Kasper: Putting a Red Hat on

    I have heard that there is already a number of Debian Developers working for Red Hat, so if you happen to be one of them, I hope we’ll get in touch !

Sleepless and prepared: SUSE’s Melissa Di Donato draws on open-source’s community spirit

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In normal times, asking the chief executive officer of a major technology company what keeps him or her up at night would generally elicit responses ranging from profitability and customer growth to innovation and the pursuit of digital transformation.

But these are not normal times.

“What keeps me up at night now and how I wake up every morning is wondering about the health of my employees,” said Melissa Di Donato (pictured), chief executive officer of SUSE Group. “For us, this is nothing new, and we were really fortunate that we had the mechanisms in place to handle the pandemic first in China and then as it came across Europe and the U.S.”

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Bringing Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise closer together - a proposal

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SUSE
Hi everyone,

today I have some exciting news and a proposal to relay: SUSE wants to
go another step in openness towards the openSUSE community and suggests
to bring the relationship of openSUSE Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise to 
a new level.
 

OpenSUSE Leap + SUSE Linux Enterprise Planning To Move Closer In 2020

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SUSE

SUSE and the openSUSE community are working to move SUSE Linux Enterprise and openSUSE Leap closer together.

A proposal sent out today with the interest of SUSE is for taking the openSUSE Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise relationship to a new level. This new collaboration would more closely align the source trees of openSUSE Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise Linux, including the use of SUSE Linux Enterprise binaries within Leap.

The plan would involve merging of the code-bases for the intersection of openSUSE Leap 15.2 / SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP2 and moving forward to even create a a new openSUSE Leap 15.2 flavor leveraging SUSE Linux Enterprise binaries.

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Direct: opensuse-announce

Also: Bringing Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise closer together - a proposal

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • SUSE Cloud Application Platform Air gapped installation

    Containers has become first choice and ask from customers and Kubernetes is the first choice for container orchestration. Cloud native applications are being built. SUSE Cloud Application Platform is a modern application delivery platform used to bring an advance cloud native developer experience to Kubernetes. SUSE has containerized Cloud foundry.

    Container images being downloaded on Kubernetes master and worker nodes when we deploy SUSE Cloud Application Platform. Source of these container images can be SUSE registry site which is registry.suse.com or can be a local registry in the same network of Kubernetes master and worker nodes.

  • SUSE Home Office Workplace: Our offering for your business continuity strategy

    Providing employees in the home office with secure and reliable access to their business-critical applications – that is currently the big challenge for companies. Hardware bottlenecks, limited budgets and enormous time pressure make the implementation of emergency plans more difficult in many organizations. To help you work from home, we offer a cost-effective business continuity solution that you can implement quickly and easily: the SUSE Home Office Workplace.

  • SUSE Manager 4: The Smart Choice for Managing Linux

    “Only SUSE Manager combines software content lifecycle management (CLM) with a centrally staged repository and class-leading configuration management and automation, plus optional state of the art monitoring capabilities, for all major Linux distributions.”

    These days, IT departments manage highly dynamic and heterogeneous networks under constantly changing requirements. One important trend that has contributed to the growing complexity is the rise of software-defined infrastructures (SDIs). An SDI consists of a single pool of virtual resources that system administrators can manage efficiently and always in the same way, regardless of whether the resources reside on premise or in the cloud. SUSE Manager is a powerful tool that brings the promise of SDI to Linux server management.

    You can use SUSE Manager to manage a diverse pool of Linux systems through their complete lifecycle, including deployment, configuration, auditing and software management. This paper highlights some of the benefits of SUSE Manager and describes how SUSE Manager stacks up against other open source management solutions.

  • Automating the SAP HANA High Availability Cluster Deployment for Microsoft Azure
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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Doom Emacs For Noobs

    Doom Emacs is my preferred text editor, and I have made several videos about it. But some of those videos assumed that the viewer had some knowledge of Vim and/or Emacs. So I decided to make this Doom Emacs introductory video for the complete noob! This video covers how to install Doom Emacs, how to configure it, and some of the basic keybindings and commands.

  • The Endless Stream Of Linux Video Topics To Sift Through
  • Debian Janitor: Expanding Into Improving Multi-Arch

    The Debian Janitor is an automated system that commits fixes for (minor) issues in Debian packages that can be fixed by software. It gradually started proposing merges in early December. The first set of changes sent out ran lintian-brush on sid packages maintained in Git. This post is part of a series about the progress of the Janitor.

  • New Debian Maintainers (July and August 2020)

    The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months: Chirayu Desai Shayan Doust Arnaud Ferraris Fritz Reichwald Kartik Kulkarni François Mazen Patrick Franz Francisco Vilmar Cardoso Ruviaro Octavio Alvarez Nick Black Congratulations!

  • MYIR launches FZ5 EdgeBoard AI Box for AI on the Edge

    Back in July of this year (2020), MYRI technology announced the MYIR’s FZ3 deep learning accelerator card powered by the Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ ZU3EG Arm FPGA MPSoC and it is capable of delivering up to 1.2TOPS computing power. With only a few months since that launch, MYRI technology is now announcing another two related sets of products – FZ5 EdgeBoard AI Box and the FZ5 Card.

  • SYNCPLIFY.ME AFT! V3.0 SUPPORTS LINUX ON ARM

    But, arguably, the most relevant new feature is AFT!’s native support for ARM processors, when in combination with a Linux operating system. With giants like Apple, moving away from the x86 architecture to fully embrace ARM on their entire product line, it was a strategic choice for Syncplify to be ahead of the curve, and release an ARM-native version of their software.

  • Where’s the Yelp for open-source tools?

    We’d like an easy way to judge open-source programs. It can be done. But easily? That’s another matter. When it comes to open source, you can’t rely on star power. The “wisdom of the crowd” has inspired all sorts of online services wherein people share their opinions and guide others in making choices. The Internet community has created many ways to do this, such as Amazon reviews, Glassdoor (where you can rate employers), and TripAdvisor and Yelp (for hotels, restaurants, and other service providers). You can rate or recommend commercial software, too, such as on mobile app stores or through sites like product hunt. But if you want advice to help you choose open-source applications, the results are disappointing. It isn’t for lack of trying. Plenty of people have created systems to collect, judge, and evaluate open-source projects, including information about a project’s popularity, reliability, and activity. But each of those review sites – and their methodologies – have flaws. Take that most archaic of programming metrics: Lines of code (LoC). Yes, it’s easy to measure. But it’s also profoundly misleading. As programming genius Edsger Dijkstra observed in 1988, LoC gives people “the reassuring illusion that programs are just devices like any others, the only difference admitted being that their manufacture might require a new type of craftsmen, viz. programmers. From there it is only a small step to measuring ‘programmer productivity’ in terms of ‘number of lines of code produced per month.’ This is a very costly measuring unit because it encourages the writing of insipid code.” We’ve gotten better since then, haven’t we? Perhaps not.

  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 79
  • Fun with Java Records

    Records, like lambdas and default methods on interfaces are tremendously useful language features because they enable many different patterns and uses beyond the obvious. Java 8 brought lambdas, with lots of compelling uses for streams. What I found exciting at the time was that for the first time lots of things that we’d previously have to have waited for as new language features could become library features. While waiting for lambdas we had a Java 7 release with try-with-resources. If we’d had lambdas we could have implemented something similar in a library without needing a language change.

  • How to code a basic WordPress plugin

    With over 7 million downloads for WordPress 5.3 alone, WordPress has become one of the most influential CMS of all time.

  • Laravel CSRF Protection

    The full form of CSRF is Cross-Site Request Forgery. It is one type of online attack in which the attacker sends requests as an authorized user to a system by gaining access information of a particular user of that system and performs different types of malicious activities by using the identity of that user. The impact of this attack depends on the victim’s privileges on the system. If the victim is a normal user then it will affect the personal data of the victim only. But if the victim is the administrator of the system then the attacker can damage the whole system. The users of any business website, social networking can be affected by this attack. This attack can be prevented easily by using Laravel CSRF protection to make the system more secure. Laravel generates CRSF token for each active user session automatically by which any request and approval are given to the authenticated user for the system. How Laravel CSRF Protection can be applied in the Laravel application is shown in this tutorial.

  • Popular VPN closes critical vulnerability on Linux client

    The VPN service Private Internet Access (PIA) has released a new version of its Linux client which fixes a critical vulnerability that could have allowed remote attackers to bypass the software's kill switch. The vulnerability, tracked as CVE-2020-15590, was discovered by Sick Codes and it affects versions 1.5 through 2.3 of PIA's Linux client. The client's kill switch is configured to block all inbound and outbound network traffic when a VPN connection drops. However, privileged applications still have the ability to send and receive network traffic even when the kill switch is turned on if net.ipv4.ip_forward has been enabled in the system kernel parameters. [...] “For the issue raised, we have no legacy customer support requests relating to this use case. We welcome input from community sources in addressing their usage and with this in mind, we took the decision to support this use case with our next Linux client release.” PIA users running Docker on Linux should upgrade to version 2.4 of the company's client as soon as possible to avoid any potential attacks leveraging this vulnerability.

  • 3 ways to protect yourself from imposter syndrome

    Poet and activist Maya Angelou published many books throughout her storied career, but each time, she feared people would figure out that she'd "run a game on everybody, and they're going to find me out." This seems an odd response from a well-honored writer. What she is describing is her own challenge with imposter syndrome. Think for a moment about your own accomplishments. Being hired into a new role. Having your first open source contribution merged into the project. Receiving an award or recognition. Being invited to participate in a project or event with people you respect and look up to. Did you question whether you belonged there? Did you fear people would "know that you didn't belong?" There is an extremely high likelihood that you have also experienced imposter syndrome. Please check the survey at the end of this article to see that you're not alone.

Graphics: NVIDIA, Intel, AMD and Zink

     
  • NVIDIA GeForce Now quietly starts working on Linux as the Avengers come to play

    If you use or have been following NVIDIA GeForce Now, the cloud gaming platform that delivers PC titles you already own from sources such as Steam and Epic Games to a multitude of devices, the latest development seems to have emerged silently. Spotted by the team at GamingonLinux, users of Linux can now, it seems, access GeForce Now in either Chromium of Google Chrome. Indeed, previously this tactic involved fudging user agents to make GeForce Now believe you were on a Chromebook, following the launch of the web client for Google's laptops. And it works just fine, I logged in and played some games with no issues on Ubuntu in both browsers. And just to double check, Firefox still shows an incompatible device error.

  • Intel Compute Runtime 20.37.17906 Brings Rocket Lake Support

    Intel's software team has released a new version of their Compute Runtime that provides OpenCL and oneAPI Level Zero capabilities for their graphics hardware on Linux.

  • AMDGPU TMZ + HDCP Should Allow Widevine DRM To Behave Nicely With AMD Linux Systems

    Coming together this year for the mainline Linux kernel was the AMDGPU Trusted Memory Zone (TMZ) capability for encrypted video memory support with Radeon GPUs. This topic was talked about at this week's XDC2020 conference. AMDGPU TMZ prevents unauthorized applications from accessing the encrypted/trusted memory of an application. TMZ protects both reads and writes while leveraging an AES cipher. But while discrete Radeon GPUs can also support TMZ, for now the AMD Linux developers have just been focused on the capability for their APU platforms.

  • Zink OpenGL-On-Vulkan Seeing Some 50~100% FPS Gains

    After working on getting the Zink OpenGL-over-Vulkan driver up to OpenGL 4.6 with still pending patches, former Samsung OSG engineer Mike Blumenkrantz has been making remarkable progress on the performance aspect as well. This generic Mesa OpenGL implementation that works atop Vulkan drivers is about to see much better performance. Blumenkrantz recently commented the performance was turning out better than expected but that was for micro-benchmarks. But now with more optimizations he is achieving even better results.

Sculpt OS release 20.08

  • Sculpt OS release 20.08

    The new version of Sculpt OS is based on the latest Genode release 20.08. In particular, it incorporates the redesigned GUI stack to the benefit of quicker boot times, improved interactive responsiveness, and better pixel output quality. It also removes the last traces of the noux runtime. Fortunately, these massive under-the-hood changes do not disrupt the user-visible surface of Sculpt. Most users will feel right at home. Upon closer inspection, there are couple of new features to appreciate. The CPU-affinity of each component can now be restricted interactively by the user, components can be easily restarted via a click on a button, font-size changes have an immediate effect now, and the VESA driver (used when running Sculpt in a virtual machine) can dynamically change the screen resolution.

  • Sculpt OS 20.08 Released With Redesigned GUI Stack

    Building off the recent Genode OS 20.08 operating system framework release is now Sculpt OS 20.08 as the open-source project's general purpose operating system attempt. Sculpt OS 20.08 pulls in the notable Genode 20.08 changes like the redesigned GUI stack with better responsiveness and other benefits. It also includes the ability to run the Falk web browser as the first Chromium-based browser on Genode/Sculpt. Sculpt OS is Genode's effort around creating a general purpose OS but for right now is still largely limited to developers, hobbyists, and those wishing to tinker around with new operating systems.

today's howtos