Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Linux Kernel 4.10.3, GNOME 3.24 Coming Soon

Filed under
SUSE

Dominique Leuenberger from the openSUSE Project is informing the Tumbleweed community about the latest updates brought by a total of five snapshots during the week that passed.

Read more

SUSE acquires HPE's cloud assets

Filed under
SUSE

HPE and SUSE, a top Linux distributor, have a complex relationship. First, HPE spun and merged its non-core software assets with Micro Focus. Micro Focus owns SUSE, a major Linux provider. Now, SUSE has finished acquiring cloud assets of HPE's OpenStack Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS), Cloud Foundry Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS), and Stackato, HPE's Cloud Foundry implementation.

Read more

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • Rolling to Leap 42.3

    The bits and pieces needed for a rolling development phase of Leap 42.3 are now up and running!

  • OpenSUSE Leap 42.3 Will Be Developed In A Rolling Manner

    Ubuntu dropped their official alpha/betas long ago, Fedora 27 is dropping their alphas, and openSUSE is also shifting their development approach and will get rid of alpha and beta releases. OpenSUSE Leap 42.3 will be developed in a "rolling" manner although the release will not be a rolling-release post-release, unlike openSUSE Tumbleweed.

  • YaST development during Hack Week 15

    During this Hack Week, some of our team members invested quite some time working in YaST related projects. But, what’s even better, some people from outside the team worked also in YaST projects. Thank you guys!

openSUSE.Asia Summit and openSUSE Tumbleweed

Filed under
SUSE
  • Committee Accepting Proposals for openSUSE.Asia Summit

    The openSUSE.Asia organization committee is accepting proposals to host the openSUSE.Asia Summit during the second half of 2017. The openSUSE.Asia Summit is the largest annual openSUSE conference in Asia and is attended by contributors and enthusiasts from all over Asia.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.10, Users Get Mesa 17

    Good news for users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system, as openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio informed the community about the latest updates that landed in the repositories in the last week of February 2017.

    It would appear that only four snapshots were released for openSUSE Tumbleweed users last week, but they brought a bunch of goodies that many will adore, starting with the recently released Linux 4.10.1 kernel. openSUSE Tumbleweed is also proudly powered by the newest Mesa 17.0 3D Graphics Library, for a better gaming experience.

Tumbleweed Gets Kernel 4.10.1, Mesa 17, Python 3.6

Filed under
SUSE

The joy and experimentation of Hack Week didn’t keep openSUSE Tumbleweed from continuing to roll.

Since the last news article on Tumbleweed two weeks ago, there have been eight snapshots featuring new software packages.

The most recent snapshot to land in the repositories was snapshot 20170228, which provided less than a handful of packages.

Read more

Also: OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Now Running On Linux 4.10, Updated Flatpak & More

Events: g2k16 Hackathon, SUSE Hackweek, LinuxFest Northwest 2017

Filed under
OSS
SUSE
  • g2k16 Hackathon Report: Matthieu Herrb on xenodm

    I started the hackathon by upgrading a number of packages in Xenocara. The most noteworthy being the XCB (X protocol C-language Bindings) suite updated to the most recent 1.12 version.

  • Hackweek projet: Let's Encrypt DNS-01 validation for acme.sh with Gandi LiveDNS

    Last week was SUSE Hackweek and one of my projects was to get Let's Encrypt configured and working on my NAS.

    Let's Encrypt is a project aimed at providing SSL certificates for free, in an automated way.

  • openSUSE at LinuxFest Northwest 2017

    LinuxFest Northwest 2017, coming up the first weekend in May, promises to continue its tradition of providing a unique, active, fun experience for open-source enthusiasts at all experience levels. openSUSE continues its long-term sponsorship of the event, and we are looking forward to having a lot of fun! Submit your session proposals by March 1, 2017!

    LinuxFest Northwest, if you’re not familiar, is one of the largest community-centric conferences in the USA, and a free+libre event (no attendance fees and registration is optional) promoting open source, open hardware, and community involvement. Now in its 16th year, with an audience rapidly approaching 2,000 people, the event continues to grow, attract a broader audience, and redefine the experience of a weekend conference. With a Linux Game Den, a Robotics Lab, a Job Fair (new this year), community mini-summits, as well as the expo hall and 8 – 10 parallel tracks of sessions, LFNW is a week of conference stuffed into a weekend.

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • OBS got the power!

    Old build workers, rack mounted

    Old build workers, rack mounted

    One year after introducing a new kind of Open Build Service worker machines, the “lambkins”, the openSUSE Build Service got a big hardware refresh. The new machines, sponsored by SUSE, are equipped with:

    2,8GHz AMD Opteron Processors (6348)
    256 GB RAM
    one 120 GB SSD

    Four of them are located in a chassis with a height of 2 units and run 12-16 workers on them (virtual machines, that are building packages).

    That new build power allowed us to remove some of old machines from the pool. The unified hardware makes the management of the machines a lot easier now, even if there are still the most powerful old machines left.

  • openSUSE Heroes December meeting – final results

    While we had some fun and good food and drinks, we also managed to discuss a lot during the three days in the Nuremberg headquarter. This was needed because this was the first time that the Heroes came together in their current form. In the end, we managed to do no coding and even (nearly) no administration – but instead we started to discuss our (internal and external) policies and work flows – and did some decisions regarding the next steps and the future of the openSUSE infrastructure.

  • New and improved Inqlude web site

    During last year's Summer of Code I had the honor of mentoring Nanduni Indeewaree Nimalsiri. She worked on Inqlude, the comprehensive archive of third party Qt libraries, improving the tooling to create a better structured web site with additional features such as categorization by topic. She did an excellent job with it and all of her code ended up on the master branch. But we hadn't yet made the switch to change the default layout of the web site to fully take advantage of all her work. As part of SUSE's 15th Hack Week, which is taking place this week, I took some time to change that, put up some finishing touches, and switch the Inqlude web site to the new layout. So here we are. I proudly present the new improved home page of Inqlude.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Powered by Linux Kernel 4.9.9 and Mesa 13.0.4, Update Now

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio reports today, February 16, about the latest software updates and technologies that landed in the stable repositories during last week and the beginning of this one via a total of six snapshots.

Read more

Kurdish Group Hacks openSUSE Linux Website

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

In this day and age, you never know where you're going to run across a political statement. For example, if you visited the openSUSE News website on Monday, you would have been treated to an image of the Kurdistan flag, along with a rather potty mouthed anti-ISIS statement.

Yup. The openSUSE site had been defaced, by a hacker identifying himself as MuhmadEmad and connected with a group called "KurDish HaCk3Rs." A screenshot of the defaced site is available -- thanks to Roy Schestowitz, publisher of Tux Machines and Techrights -- but we'll not show it here due to an F-bomb in the message. The good news is that little harm seems to have been done and the site was quickly returned to normal by way of a recent backup.

Read more

OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Gnome - Better but not really

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

It is time to give Leap a second chance. Let me be extra corny. Give leap a chance. Yes. Well, several weeks ago, I reviewed the Plasma edition of the latest openSUSE release, and while it was busy firing all cannon, like a typical Stormtrooper, most of the beams did not hit the target. It was a fairly mediocre distro, delivering everything but then stopping just short of the goodness mark.

I will now conduct a Gnome experiment. Load the distro with a fresh new desktop environment, and see how it behaves. We did something rather similar with CentOS recently, with some rather surprising results. Hint. Maybe we will get lucky. Let's do it.

Read more

Also new: Tumbleweed Snapshots Bring Users New Vulkan, 4.9.7 Kernel

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

An introduction to Joplin, an open source Evernote alternative

Joplin is an open source cross-platform note-taking and to-do application. It can handle a large number of notes, organized into notebooks, and can synchronize them across multiple devices. The notes can be edited in Markdown, either from within the app or with your own text editor, and each application has an option to render Markdown with formatting, images, URLs, and more. Any number of files, such as images and PDFs, can be attached to a note, and notes can also be tagged. I started developing Joplin when Evernote changed its pricing model and because I wanted my 4,000+ notes to be stored in a more open format, free of any proprietary solution. To that end, I have developed three Joplin applications, all under the MIT License: for desktop (Windows, MacOS, and Linux), for mobile (Android and iOS), and for the terminal (Windows, MacOS, and Linux). All the applications have similar user interfaces and can synchronize with each other. They are based on open standards and technologies including SQLite and JavaScript for the backend, and Terminal Kit (Node.js), Electron, and React Native for the three front ends. Read more

Open Source OS Still supporting 32-bit Architecture and Why it’s Important

One after the other, Linux distributions are dropping 32-bit support. Or, to be accurate, they drop support for the Intel x86 32-bit architecture (IA-32). Indeed, computers based on x86_64 hardware (IA-64) are superior in every way to their 32-bits counterpart: they are more powerful, run faster, are more compact, and more energy efficient. Not mentioning their price has considerably decreased in just a few years. If you have the opportunity to switch to 64 bits, do it. But, to quote a mail I received recently from Peter Tribble, author of Tribblix: “[… ] in the developed world we assume that we can replace things; in some parts of the developing world older IA-32 systems are still the norm, with 64-bit being rare.” Read more

KDE Applications 17.12 Lands with Dolphin Enhancements, HiDPI Support for Okular

KDE Applications 17.12 has been in development for the past several months and it's now available as a drop-in replacement for the previous series of the software suite, KDE Applications 17.08, which reached end of life in early November. As expected, several of the included apps received various enhancements and new features in this release. Among these, we can mention that the Dolphin file manager is now capable of saving searches, can limit the search only to folders, makes renaming of files easier by allowing the user to simply double-click on the file name, displays extra information about files like origin URL of downloaded file or modification date, and introduces new Bitrate, Genre, and Release Year columns. Read more Also: KDE Applications 17.12 Brings HiDPI Improvements, Rest Of KDE Games Ported To KF5 KDE Ships KDE Applications 17.12.0

Stable kernels 4.14.6 and 4.9.69

Two new stable kernels have been released by Greg Kroah-Hartman: 4.14.6 and 4.9.69. As usual, they contain fixes all over the kernel tree; users of those series should upgrade. Read more See: Linux 4.14.6 and Linux 4.9.69