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SUSE

SUSE/OpenSUSE: OpenSUSE + LibreOffice Conference, ZeroLogon, YaST and More

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SUSE
  • Conference organizers announce schedule and platform registration

    Organizers of the online openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference are pleased to announce that the schedule for the conference is published.

    All times on the schedule are published in Coordinated Universal Time. The conference will take place from live Oct. 15 to Oct. 17 using the oslo.gonogo.live platform.

    There are more than 100 talks scheduled, covering the openSUSE and LibreOffice projects. There are talks about open-source projects, cloud and container technologies, embedded devices, community development, translations, marketing, documentation, Future Technologies, Quality Assurance and more.

  • SUSE Addresses “ZeroLogon” Vulnerability

    On September 11, Secura research published a new software vulnerability called “ZeroLogon”, which exploits a protocol weakness in the SMB Netlogon protocol. This vulnerability may affect users of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server running Samba servers in older or non-standard configurations. Attackers could use it to bypass access control to the domain controller.

  • Digest of YaST Development Sprint 108

    In our previous post we reported we were working in some mid-term goals in the areas of AutoYaST and storage management. This time we have more news to share about both, together with some other small YaST improvements.

  • Johann Els on running SUSE Linux Enterprise Server on SAP

Tumbleweed Snapshots bring updated Inkscape, Node.js, KDE Applications

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SUSE

Four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released since the last article.

KDE’s Applications 20.08.1, Node.js, iproute2 and inkscape were updated in the snapshots throughout the week.

The 20200915 snapshot is trending stable at a rating of 97, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer. Many YaST packages were updated in this snapshot. The 4.3.19 yast2-network package forces a read of the current virtualization network configuration in case it’s not present. The Chinese pinyin character input package libpinyin updated to 2.4.91, which improved auto correction.

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IBM and SUSE/OpenSUSE

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • IBM Z and Linux Innovation: 20 Years and Counting

    IBM was ahead of its time in relationship to the upstart Linux operating system in the mid-1990s. Twenty years later and a huge amount of innovation later, IBM and the open source system are partners in thousands of systems globally.

  • OpenPOWER Foundation Introduces IBM Hardware and Software Contributions at OpenPOWER Summit 2020

    A2O POWER processor core, an out-of-order follow-up to the A2I core, and associated FPGA environment

  • Conference Organizers Announce Schedule, Platform Registration

    Organizers of the openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference are pleased to announce the schedule for the conference is published.  

    All times on the schedule are published in Coordinated Universal Time. The conference will take place live Oct. 15 through Oct. 17 using the https://oslo.gonogo.live/ platform.

    There are more than 100 talks scheduled that range from talks about the openSUSE and LibreOffice projects to talks about documentation. There are talks about open-source projects, cloud and container technologies, embedded devices, community development, translations, marketing, future technologies, quality assurance and more. 

    There will be multiple sessions happening at the same time, so some talks might overlap. Attendees have an option to personalize a schedule so that they are reminded when the live talk they would like to see begins. 

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  • openSUSE Projects Support Hacktoberfest Efforts

    The openSUSE community is ready for Hacktoberfest, which is run by Digital Ocean and DEV that encourages people to make their first contributions to open source projects. The openSUSE + LibreOffice Virtual Conference will take place during Hacktoberfest and is listed as an event on the website. The conference will have more than 100 talks about open source projects ranging from documentation to the technologies within each project.

Firefox, Ceph Major Versions Arrive in Tumbleweed

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SUSE

Six openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots have arrived in the rolling release since the last Tumblweed update.

KDE’s Plasma 5.19.5, php and Ceph were among more of the known updates.

The display-oriented email client Alpine updated to version 2.23 in the 20200908 snapshot and provided support for the Simple Authentication and Security Layer-IR IMAP extension. The open-source disk encryption package cryptsetup 2.3.4 added support options for the 5.9 kernel and fixed a Common Vulnerabilities and Exposure affecting the memory write. A couple of RubyGem packages were updated in the snapshot and the 2.43 libcap package added some more release time checks for non-git tracked files. The snapshot is trending stable at a rating of 99, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Also trending at a 99 rating, snapshot 20200907 brought two package updates with fetchmail 6.4.12 and perl-Cpanel-JSON-XS 4.23. Fetchmail provided some regression fixes that were introduced in the versions between the 6.4.12 update and the previous 6.4.8 version in Tumbleweed.

Just four packages were updated in the 20200906 snapshot. The Heaptrack fast heap memory profiler updated to version 1.2.0; the package that allows you to track all heap memory allocations at run-time removed a fix-compile patch for 32bit. New features were added in the libvirt 6.7.0 version; added support for device model command-line passthrough for xen was one of the changes and there was also a change to the spec file that enables the same hypervisor drivers for openSUSE and SUSE Linux Enterprise. The update of php 7.4.10 fixed a memory leak and python-libvirt-python 6.7.0 add all new APIs and constants in libvirt 6.7.0.

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Fedora, Red Hat and SUSE

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Fedora IoT becomes an edition

    The Fedora 33 release is currently scheduled for late October; as part of the process of designing this release, the deadline for system-wide change proposals was set for June 30. This release already has a substantial number of big changes in the works, so one might be forgiven for being surprised by a system-wide change proposal that appeared on August 4, which looks to be pre-approved. Not only that, but this proposal expands the small set of official Fedora "editions" by adding the relatively obscure Fedora Internet of Things Edition.

    The Fedora distribution is released in a number of forms, including a fair number of "Fedora spins" that skew the distribution toward a specific use case. The flagship Fedora products, though, are the editions, of which there are currently only two: Fedora Workstation and Fedora Server. The former is obviously aimed at desktop deployments, while the latter is meant to be useful on back-end systems. This set of editions has been stable for some time.

    There are a few "emerging editions" in the works, including Fedora CoreOS and Silverblue. Also on that list is Fedora IoT which is now poised to become the third edition to be part of the Fedora 33 release. The proposal notes that this is "largely a paperwork exercise at this point". While the remaining work may be confined to paperwork, the project may want to put some effort into documentation sooner or later; actual information about what Fedora IoT is and how to work with it is relatively hard to find.

    [...]

    One other significant difference with Fedora IoT is a relatively strong focus on the use of containers to install applications. The podman tool is provided for this purpose; it's meant to look a lot like Docker, but without the need for any background daemons. Podman comes configured to pull images from docker.io by default. Your editor attempted to use it to install a few versions of NetHack that must all surely be legitimate, but none of them consented to run correctly — thus saving your editor a considerable amount of wasted time.

    Beyond those changes, though, Fedora IoT feels much like any other Fedora system. The commands work in the same way, and the usual packages are available. This makes for a relatively rich and comfortable environment for embedded-systems work.

    One can't help wonder about the ultimate objective, though. Fedora comes with no support guarantees, a fact that is sure to give pause to any companies thinking about which operating system to install in their million-device products. If Fedora is to have any chance of being deployed in such systems, some sort of commercial support option will have to materialize. When that happens, it may well go under the name of "Red Hat IoT" or some such. Fedora itself may not make it onto all of those devices, but Fedora users will have played with the technology first and helped to make it better.

  • Open source: the pathway to innovation

    Open source technology has seen widespread adoption over the past ten to fifteen years as organisations cross-industry have caught on to its undeniable benefits.

    As the largest open source company in the world, at Red Hat, we believe in the power of open source and its ability, from both a software and cultural perspective, to push the boundaries of technological capabilities. Here’s why.

    [...]

    Open source software is by definition ‘open’, offering companies full visibility and transparency of the code – this means bugs and defects can be identified much more quickly than in proprietary software, leading to enhanced security. As Linus Torvalds, the founder of the open source operating system Linux, once said: “given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow”.

    Secondly, it doesn’t include many of the costs associated with proprietary software, such as licensing fees – this is a big perk for businesses, allowing them to significantly reduce operating costs. Then there is the added cost of wanting to switch to a different software provider down the line; using open source software helps to avoid the pitfall of getting locked into using an expensive proprietary vendor.

    Open source also enables companies to better customise their software. Unlike proprietary software that is developed within the four walls of the company and based on limited input, open source software is typically better tailored to the customers’ needs, as the users themselves can add their preferred features while the technology is in development.

    [...]

    Female contributors are definitely becoming more widely recognised. And even though there is still more work to be done, throughout my career I’ve encountered more women in the context of open source than in proprietary software, and I’ve witnessed more inclusive meritocracy within open source companies. Besides the fact that open thinking is an essential part of supplementing the open source, open communities, by their design, make it much easier for individuals from all backgrounds to participate, have a voice, and share their experience and skills.

    It’s been proven time and again that the more diversity you can bring to a project, the better the outcome is, as you’re benefitting from a greater variety of perspectives, ideas and experience. For this reason, I’d argue that open source is both the fastest and most inclusive way to innovate.

  • Collaboration integral to operations, Red Hat CFO says

    When the pandemic hit, CFO Laurie Krebs, with other function leaders at open-source operating system company Red Hat, created a war room to respond to customers' deferral requests and other payment concessions.

    "Our premier product is an operating system, so, [for that to] go dark is not an option for a lot of customers," Krebs said.

    Rather than create a single playbook, the team approached each request on a case-by-case basis. "To some people, cash is important," she said. "To other people, holding onto their subscription is important."

    The war room's collaborative approach, in which representatives from sales, sales operations, technical accounting and business finance weighed requests as a team, defines how the company approaches all of its policymaking, said Krebs, who took over as CFO last year after serving as vice president of global tax.

  • Want to make better decisions? Encourage disagreement

    Dissent is incredibly important to successful open decision making. When you're seeking collaboration on an important decision, you don't want to be surrounded by people who always agree with everything you say. You already know everything that you're saying and what you believe to be the best path forward. However, you also know (or should know) that your knowledge, experience, and visibility of the entire picture is limited. What you really need are perspectives from people with knowledge, experience, and visibility complementary to yours. That helps round out your perspective—people who will bring up something that you didn't think of or didn't fully comprehend its importance.

    In this article, I'll explore in more depth the importance of dissension during decision making. I'll present a compilation of ideas from a number of my colleagues (at Red Hat), which arose in an open forum discussion we had on the subject.

    [...]

    When presenting an idea and asking for opinions in a meeting, plenty more great ideas and perspectives may be left unsaid. How can we unleash the power that this potential represents?

    [...]

    Using this method can empower your group to fully explore various ways to achieve their objectives. It should present decision makers with all available perspectives and enable them to make the decision that is best for the group.

    Best of all, since they've been included in a decision making process, the entire group will feel ownership over the decision and passionately work to implement and execute it.

  • Here’s What’s .NEXT for Nutanix and SUSE

    Let’s start by stating the obvious. At SUSE, we’re passionate about advancing open source technology to provide better customer outcomes. While that ethos is at the core of SUSE’s business, the truth is that many of our partners embrace that same passion, and work with SUSE to deliver better experiences for their own customers and end users.

  • Adapting for Hybrid Cloud – Part 3 of 3: The Results

    Most enterprises today are pursuing a hybrid strategy, mixing and matching public and on-prem venues depending on each workload’s requirements. One of the issues facing enterprises with hybrid today is the difference in pricing and procurement models. For public cloud, on-demand operating expense pricing is pretty mainstream, and this on-demand access to huge capacity is one of the key drivers behind public cloud adoption, driving more rapid instantiation of resources, allowing the scaling of applications to suit changing demands, making innovation easier and simplifying entry into new markets.

  • SLES for SAP Applications 15 SP2: What’s New and What’s Next

Tumbleweed Rises from Rebuilt Packages

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SUSE

With “literally all 15,000” packages being rebuilt in snapshot 20200826, openSUSE Tumbleweed roared back from a stability rating of 36 in the rebuild snapshot to a 95 rating in snapshot 20200901, according to the snapshot reviewer.

Each snapshot progressively increased in stability this week.

Snapshot 20200901 brought ImageMagick 7.0.10.28, which provided a patch for correct colospace and fixed paths for conversion of Photoshop EPS files. VirtualBox 6.1.13 arrived in the snapshot and updated the sources to run with versions above the 5.8 Linux Kernel with no modifications needed to the kernel. The library for rendering Postscript documents, libspectre 0.2.9, now requires Ghostscript 9.24 and fixed memory leaks and crashes to the program caused by malformed documents. One major version update to the game freecell-solver was made in the snapshot; version 6.0.1 had some code cleanup, minor bug fixes and the addition of a compile time option. openSUSE’s snapper package updated to 0.8.13 and fixed the Logical Volume Manager setup for volume groups and logical volumes with one character-long names. Other notable packages updated in the snapshot were xapian-core 1.4.17, openldap2 2.4.52 and qalculate 3.12.1.

Trending at a 87 rating, snapshot 20200831, brought less than a handful of updates. The packages updated in the snapshot were bind 9.16.6, libverto 0.3.1, permissions 1550_20200826, and suse-module-tools 15.3.4. The bind package, which implements the Domain Name System (DNS) protocols for the Internet, fixed several Common Vulnerabilities and Exposure including one that made it possible to trigger an assertion failure by sending a specially crafted large TCP DNS message.

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Between Ubuntu 20.04 and openSUSE Leap 15.2 Releases

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SUSE
Ubuntu

This year 2020 is amazing as two big European computer operating systems come out. They are Ubuntu and openSUSE more precisely version Focal Fossa and Leap 15.2. They are ranked number 4th and 13th on Distrowatch.com.This article sums up these two for everyone to quickly download or purchase a computer with them.

The leading operating system for PCs, IoT devices, servers and the cloud.

The makers' choice for sysadmins, developers and desktop users.

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GeckoLinux releases Pantheon and Budgie editions

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OS
Linux
News
Software
SUSE

The GeckoLinux project is pleased to announce the addition of the Pantheon and Budgie desktop environments to its lineup. Both desktop environments are offered with the choice of an openSUSE Leap 15.2 or openSUSE Tumbleweed base system, plus multimedia support from the Packman repository.

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SUSE/OpenSUSE: Ritchie-CLI, Extensible Linux System Calls and 'Cloud' Hype

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SUSE

  • Ritchie-CLI for openSUSE

    Ritchie is an open source tool developed from ZUP Company that allows you to create, store and share automations securely. It also optimizes repetitive commands so you have more programming autonomy. As a member of the openSUSE community, I make the packages available to all openSUSE users.

    How does Ritchie work?

    In a general context, the common process for executing a project is to create a whole previous infrastructure, defining a language in the system that will be programmed, downloading dependencies and defining the rules that should be used for the project.

  • Canonical + SUSE Engineers Call For More Extensible Linux System Calls Moving Forward

    Aleksa Sarai of SUSE and Christian Brauner of Canonical presented at last week's Linux Plumbers Conference with a call for more extensible system calls moving forward in aiming to enhance the Linux user-space API.

    The talk was a collection of recommendations -- some of which are already common in the introduction of new system calls -- and new recommendations compared to the traditional "trial and error" approach the kernel has seen to some extent with system calls of the past.

  • Adapting for Hybrid Cloud – Part 2 of 3: The SUSE Solution

    SUSE delivers capabilities for you to combine multiple cloud platforms, including converged container and virtual infrastructure, into a single entity; one that consolidates access to resources and is controlled in a single management environment. The outcome: you gain all the benefits of cloud solutions while maintaining total control and consistency of execution.

Element | Matrix Chat Client on openSUSE

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SUSE
HowTos

All the kids have been talking about the wonders of Matrix as the future of decentralized, secure communication. I have known about it, seen bridges being used in the openSUSE discord and Telegram rooms. Most of my experience has not been great, generally there were significant delays. I have used a few clients, Riot.im on a web client, which I didn’t care for and I also used Quaternion a Qt based client but I have had issues with the encrypted messages bit. I found the user experience to be rather… lack-luster at best. Mostly, I found the whole thing quite confusing. Accessing new rooms wasn’t self-evident, understanding what Matrix is and isn’t was confusing and I therefore found it frustrating to use. My experience, has been that I really preferred Telegram for communication.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: NVIDIA, Intel, AMD and Zink

     
  • NVIDIA GeForce Now quietly starts working on Linux as the Avengers come to play

    If you use or have been following NVIDIA GeForce Now, the cloud gaming platform that delivers PC titles you already own from sources such as Steam and Epic Games to a multitude of devices, the latest development seems to have emerged silently. Spotted by the team at GamingonLinux, users of Linux can now, it seems, access GeForce Now in either Chromium of Google Chrome. Indeed, previously this tactic involved fudging user agents to make GeForce Now believe you were on a Chromebook, following the launch of the web client for Google's laptops. And it works just fine, I logged in and played some games with no issues on Ubuntu in both browsers. And just to double check, Firefox still shows an incompatible device error.

  • Intel Compute Runtime 20.37.17906 Brings Rocket Lake Support

    Intel's software team has released a new version of their Compute Runtime that provides OpenCL and oneAPI Level Zero capabilities for their graphics hardware on Linux.

  • AMDGPU TMZ + HDCP Should Allow Widevine DRM To Behave Nicely With AMD Linux Systems

    Coming together this year for the mainline Linux kernel was the AMDGPU Trusted Memory Zone (TMZ) capability for encrypted video memory support with Radeon GPUs. This topic was talked about at this week's XDC2020 conference. AMDGPU TMZ prevents unauthorized applications from accessing the encrypted/trusted memory of an application. TMZ protects both reads and writes while leveraging an AES cipher. But while discrete Radeon GPUs can also support TMZ, for now the AMD Linux developers have just been focused on the capability for their APU platforms.

  • Zink OpenGL-On-Vulkan Seeing Some 50~100% FPS Gains

    After working on getting the Zink OpenGL-over-Vulkan driver up to OpenGL 4.6 with still pending patches, former Samsung OSG engineer Mike Blumenkrantz has been making remarkable progress on the performance aspect as well. This generic Mesa OpenGL implementation that works atop Vulkan drivers is about to see much better performance. Blumenkrantz recently commented the performance was turning out better than expected but that was for micro-benchmarks. But now with more optimizations he is achieving even better results.

Sculpt OS release 20.08

  • Sculpt OS release 20.08

    The new version of Sculpt OS is based on the latest Genode release 20.08. In particular, it incorporates the redesigned GUI stack to the benefit of quicker boot times, improved interactive responsiveness, and better pixel output quality. It also removes the last traces of the noux runtime. Fortunately, these massive under-the-hood changes do not disrupt the user-visible surface of Sculpt. Most users will feel right at home. Upon closer inspection, there are couple of new features to appreciate. The CPU-affinity of each component can now be restricted interactively by the user, components can be easily restarted via a click on a button, font-size changes have an immediate effect now, and the VESA driver (used when running Sculpt in a virtual machine) can dynamically change the screen resolution.

  • Sculpt OS 20.08 Released With Redesigned GUI Stack

    Building off the recent Genode OS 20.08 operating system framework release is now Sculpt OS 20.08 as the open-source project's general purpose operating system attempt. Sculpt OS 20.08 pulls in the notable Genode 20.08 changes like the redesigned GUI stack with better responsiveness and other benefits. It also includes the ability to run the Falk web browser as the first Chromium-based browser on Genode/Sculpt. Sculpt OS is Genode's effort around creating a general purpose OS but for right now is still largely limited to developers, hobbyists, and those wishing to tinker around with new operating systems.

today's howtos

Python Programming

  • Python 3.8.5 : Linked List - part 001.
  • Doug Hellmann: sphinxcontrib.datatemplates 0.7.0

    sphinxcontrib.datatemplates is an extension for Sphinx to render parts of reStructuredText pages from data files in formats like JSON, YAML, XML, and CSV.

  • Python : 10 Ways to Filter Pandas DataFrame

    In this article, we will cover various methods to filter pandas dataframe in Python. Data Filtering is one of the most frequent data manipulation operation. It is similar to WHERE clause in SQL or you must have used filter in MS Excel for selecting specific rows based on some conditions. In terms of speed, python has an efficient way to perform filtering and aggregation. It has an excellent package called pandas for data wrangling tasks. Pandas has been built on top of numpy package which was written in C language which is a low level language. Hence data manipulation using pandas package is fast and smart way to handle big sized datasets.

  • Top GUI Frameworks that is every Python Developer's Favorite

    Python is one of the most popular and widely known programming languages that is a favorite in the developer community. Its advanced libraries and file extensions enable developers to build state-of-the-art tools for real-world problems, or simply design a GUI (Graphic User Interface). GUI plays an essential role in the computer world as it makes human-machine interaction easier. Python offers a diverse range of options for GUI frameworks. Some of these frameworks are more preferred by the developers to build both .apk and .exe applications. Moreover, its GUI toolkits include TK, GTK, QT, and wxWidgets, which come with more features than other platform-specific kits. Though the Python wiki on GUI programming lists on 30 cross-platform frameworks, we have selected our top 4 picks. They are: Kivy: It an open-source Python library for the rapid development of applications that makes use of innovative user interfaces, such as multi-touch apps. This liberal MIT-licensed Kivy is based on OpenGL ES 2 and includes native multi-touch for each platform. It is an event-driven framework based around the main loop, making it very suitable for game development. It supports multiple platforms, namely, Windows, MacOSX, Linux, Android-iOS, and Raspberry Pi. Unlike QtCreator, Kivy doesn’t have a visual layout program, but it uses its own design language to help you associate UI layout with code objects.