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openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets Latest Linux 4.15.7 Kernel and LibreOffice 6.0.2

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On the first day of the month, OpenSuSE Tumbleweed received the KDE Plasma 5.12.2 LTS desktop environment, Gawk 4.2.1, GNU C Library (Glibc) 2.27, and GnuPG 2.2.5. The second day of March brought the latest Linux 4.15.7 kernel to Tumbleweed users, along with the OpenJDK security patch.

"openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed has had five snapshots so far this month and a lot of those snapshots have includes several GNU packages," said Douglas DeMaio. "There were many other packages and the first snapshot of the month included an update for KDE Plasma."

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GNOME Shell vs. KDE Plasma Graphics Tests On Wayland vs. X.Org Server

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A premium member this week had requested some benchmarks of openSUSE Tumbleweed when looking at the performance of KDE Plasma vs. GNOME Shell in some open-source graphics/gaming tests while also looking at the Wayland vs. X.Org Server performance.

With KDE Plasma 5.12 that openSUSE Tumbleweed has picked up, there is much better Wayland session support compared to previous releases. While KDE developers aren't yet ready to declare their Wayland session the default, in my experience so far it's been working out very well but still routinely will find application crashes in Kate and the like when testing under the KWin's Wayland compositor.

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Official KDE Plasma 5.12 Release Now in Tumbleweed

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KDE Plasma 5.12 transitioned from it beta version of 5.11.95 to the official release in an openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot earlier this week.

On the same day of the upstream release, Tumbleweed snapshot 20180206 brought the new desktop software to its thousands of rolling release users. Improved performance and several new features are available in Plasma 5.12 like Wayland-only Night Color feature that allows adjustments to the screen color temperature to reduce eye strain and the System Activity and System Monitor display per-process graphs for the CPU usage. The new KDE Store offers a wide selection of addons that are ready to be installed. Plasma 5.12 is the second long-term support (LTS) release from the Plasma 5 team and will be the version used in openSUSE’s traditional distribution openSUSE Leap 15, which is expected to be released this spring.

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Also: OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Already Shipping KDE Plasma 5.12, Mesa 18.0

OpenSUSE Leap 15 Will Ship With Plasma Wayland Option

SUSE and openSUSE Leftovers

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  • SUSE serves up Linux kernel patching, live & hot

    If there’s one thing that Linux needs to aid its march onwards it is (arguably) more enterprise robustness.

    Actually, if there’s one thing that Linux needs for enterprise success it’s firms like Microsoft stating that it loves Linux, but we’ve already experienced that epiphany, so what else can we hope for?

  • Tumbleweed Snapshots Get YaST Changes for Firewalld

    There is no signs of slowing down openSUSE’s rolling release  Tumbleweed as six snapshots of new software were released this past week.

    Not all the snapshots were large; in fact, one offered just a handful of new packages, but the releases keep coming.

SUSE releases live patching for big iron, real-time OS update

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Germany-based Linux vendor SUSE Linux has launched live patching for its enterprise Linux distribution that runs on IBM Power Systems and also a service pack for its real-tine enterprise distribution that will enable systems running it to handle both real-time and non-real-time workloads on a single virtual machine.

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openSUSE's New Beta and Ruby on openSUSE

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  • openSUSE Leap 15 Operating System Enters Beta, Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15
  • OpenSUSE Leap 15 Beta Snapshots Begin, Powered By Linux 4.14 + Plasma 5.12

    The first public beta snapshots have begun for openSUSE Leap 15, the distribution that will be mirroring SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15 that is under development for release this summer.

  • Ruby on openSUSE

    Ruby is a wonderful programming language. Every year in December as a kind of Christmas present there is a new release. It's great to be on a language which is kept up to date but it comes with the challenge to manage multiple Ruby versions. There are a couple of solutions around such as RVM, rbenv, or chruby but they all have their drawbacks.

    What would a Linux distribution do? At openSUSE, we package all the versions in the Build Service. We also package many gems but this is an effort which is sort of futile given the huge and growing number of gems and their versions. But you do reliably get the Ruby interpreter and gem tool as openSUSE package. To not create conflicts all the executables are suffixed with the Ruby version. That allows for parallel installation of multiple Ruby versions. It also works for all the executables installed through gems. The drawback is that you don't get the executable names you would expect because of the additional suffix.

openSUSE Leap 15 Reaches Beta Phase Snapshots

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Exactly like the rolling development model used to make openSUSE Leap 42.3, Leap 15.0 will use the same model until its final build. No concrete milestones will be used building up to the final release, which is expected in late Spring. As bugs are fixed and new packages introduced or excluded, snapshots of the latest beta phase builds will be released once they pass openQA testing; the first beta version build (Build 109.3) of openSUSE Leap 15 was recently released and there are currently two follow-on beta builds that would feature minor improvements if the beta builds pass openQA .

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Also: KDE Plasma 5.12, Btrfs Improvement, Linux Support for Wacom SmartPad Devices and More

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Can Now Try Out the KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS Desktop

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Eight new snapshots have been released for OpenSuSE Tumbleweed since our last report, bringing users the beta version for the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS desktop environment, which is coming in early February, along with the first point release of the KDE Applications 17.12 software suite and KDE Frameworks 5.42.0.

"The largest snapshot of the week was no doubt snapshot 20180122. The snapshot provided KDE Applications 17.12.1, Frameworks 5.42.0 and the beta version for KDE’s next Long-Term-Support (LTS) release of Plasma 5.12. Tumbleweed users can try out the new items in the 5.12 LTS like the new KDE Store, which brings a wide selection of addons," Douglas DeMaio wrote in a weekly report.

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openSUSE Education Project Is Going Bye-Bye After Release of openSUSE Leap 15.0

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A public announcement was made last week by OpenSuSE Project's Lars Vogdt to inform the community about the future of the openSUSE Education project, which tried to support schools in the past several years using the latest openSUSE Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise technologies.

The latest release of the openSUSE-Edu Li-f-e (Linux for Education) operating system was based on openSUSE Leap 42.1, and the team appears to still spend a lot of time maintaining more than 460 packages in the openSUSE Education project, but did not manage to find new contributors to maintain its repositories or create a new release.

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openSUSE and openSUSE-Education

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  • OpenSUSE Rolling Out Retpoline Support, Xen Spectre/Meltdown Mitigation

    SUSE's Richard Brown has issued a status update around openSUSE's ongoing mitigation of the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities.

    The big piece of news is openSUSE is rolling out Spectre V2 mitigation soon using Retpoliens rather than their current microcode approach where they ended up pulling that anyhow in light of the Intel CPU microcode troubles recently reported of reboots, etc.

  • The future of openSUSE-Education

    The openSUSE-Education project tries to support schools using openSUSE. We create and describe additional software-repositories for educational projects and we created Add-on medias and finally a live DVD from the regular openSUSE distribution.

    As you can see in our timeline, we achieved quite a lot in the past years, had fun and meet a couple of very nice people out there in our spare time. But the main team members moved on to new projects, with the hope that we would one day find some time to work more on openSUSE-Education again. This does not seem to happen – at least not for the foreseeable future.

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Games Leftovers

  • Atari reboots Ataribox as Atari VCS, teases April pre-order date
    Legendary game company Atari set retro hearts aflutter last year when it launched an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign for something called the Ataribox, a living room device running Linux and supposedly combining the features of a PC with a video game console -- complete with some Atari classic games. But the December 14 pre-order date Atari set was abruptly canceled after an unspecified technical issue, and it looked like the Ataribox would never reach any actual customers. This week, however, the company has emerged at the Game Developers Conference with some very similar hardware, albeit with a new name.
  • The Rocket League 'Spring Fever' event is live promising lots of flower power
    Ready to earn some more cosmetic items? The Spring Fever event in Rocket League [Steam] is now live and you can earn yourself some new items using Flowers you earn while playing like this:
  • Epic Games releases the assets from Paragon, for Unreal Engine developers
    In a move that's both surprising and rather welcome, Epic Games has decided to release the assets from their FPS MOBA Paragon for Unreal Engine developers, since they're shutting it down. This will include 20 AAA-quality characters, with their respective skins, animations, VFX and dialogue, along with over 1,500 environment components from Paragon. Here's where it's a bit insane, this all cost Epic Games around $12 million! It's pretty insane how much it costs to make AAA-like games now—eye watering.
  • Game engine Construct 3 adds a remote preview, new runtime is coming to improve game performance
    I'm a huge fan of drag and drop creation tools like Construct 3 [Official Site], that allow you to create games by building simple events sheets and it seems they've continued making Construct 3 more awesome to use.
  • Open-source re-implementation of RollerCoaster Tycoon 2 'OpenRCT2' has a fresh update
    Miss the days of playing RollerCoaster Tycoon 2? Miss them no more, as OpenRCT2 [GitHub, Official Site] is alive and well with a fresh update. Like many open source game engines, it allows you to play RollerCoaster Tycoon 2 on systems not designed for it—like Linux. Naturally, it comes with tons of improvements like user interface theming, fast-forwarding gameplay, multiplayer and so on.
  • Zombasite - Orc Schism, the expansion to the action RPG is out adding more content
    Here's one I sadly missed, released back in December (oh my!), Zombasite - Orc Schism [Steam, GOG] is an expansion to the dynamic zombie apocalypse action RPG.

GNOME: GitLab Migration and More

  • IMPORTANT: GitLab mass migration plan
    I know some fellows doesn’t read desktop-devel-list, so let me share here an email that it’s important for all to read: We have put in place the plan for the mass migration to GitLab and the steps maintainers needs to do.
  • ED Update – week 11
  • Reflections on Distractions in Work, Productivity and Time Usage
    For the past year or so I have mostly worked at home or remote in my daily life. Currently I’m engaged in my master thesis and need to manage my daily time and energy to work on it. It is no surprise to many of us that working using your internet-connected personal computer at home can make you prone to many distractions. However, managing your own time is not just about whipping and self-discipline. It is about setting yourself up in a structure which rewards you for hard work and gives your mind the breaks it needs. Based on reflections and experimentation with many scheduling systems and tools I finally felt I have achieved a set of principles I really like and that’s what I’ll be sharing with you today. [...] Minimizing shell notifications: While I don’t have the same big hammer to “block access to my e-mail” here, I decided to change the order of my e-mail inboxes in Geary so my more relevant (and far less activity prone) student e-mail inbox appears first. I also turned off the background e-mail daemon and turned off notification banners in GNOME Shell. [...] Lastly, I want to give two additional tips. If you like listening to music while working, consider whether it might affect your productivity. For example, I found music with vocals to be distracting me if I try to immerse myself in reading difficult litterature. I can really recommend Doctor Turtle’s acoustic instrumental music while working though (all free). Secondly, I find that different types of tasks requires different postures. For abstract, high-level or vaguely formulated tasks (fx formulating goals, reviewing something or reflecting), I find interacting with the computer whilst standing up and walking around to really help gather my thoughts. On the other hand with practical tasks or tasks which require immersion (fx programming tasks), I find sitting down to be much more comfortable.

OSS, Openwashing and FUD

Open Data (OD) for Research of Shootings