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SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux OS Patched Against WPA2 KRACK Bug, GCC 6 Now Removed

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SUSE

If you're using the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system, you should know that one of the latest snapshots removed the GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 6 packages from the default install and patched it against the WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get KDE Plasma 5.11 and GNOME 3.26.1 Desktops, More

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KDE
SUSE

If you're using the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system, you should know that it recently received some of the latest and greatest GNU/Linux technologies through a bunch of software updates.

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Servers, Red Hat, and SUSE

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Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • Microservices and containers: 5 pitfalls to avoid

    Because microservices and containers are a match made in heaven, it might seem like nothing could go wrong. Let’s get these babies into production as quickly as possible, then kick back and wait for the IT promotions and raises to start flooding in. Right?

    (We’ll pause while the laughter subsides.)

    Yeah, sorry. That’s just not how it works. While the two technologies can be a powerful combination, realizing their potential doesn’t happen without some effort and planning. In previous posts, we’ve tackled what you should know at the start. But what about the most common problems organizations encounter when they run microservices in containers?

  • This Week in Numbers: Container Storage Preferences for Kubernetes

    The types of logical storage structures used in today’s Kubernetes deployments offer some deeper revelations into the nature of workloads being deployed. Block storage is king, having been cited by two-thirds (66 percent) of respondents in our survey for The State of the Kubernetes Ecosystem as being involved with their Kubernetes implementations.

    Few deployments are relegated to only one type of logical storage, so it is telling that just fewer than half of the respondents (46 percent) cited file storage as the type they’re using. Newer, cloud-native applications with microservices architectures and that utilize databases or data structures, typically don’t need a file system because they are not interacting with data through an operating system. A 46 percent figure is quite high, signaling that more integration with older application types is taking place.

    Object storage is used by 29 percent of respondents, which is relatively high compared with adoption rates for object storage that we’ve seen in the past. Since object storage is scalable, developers working on distributed systems likely have experience with it already. In addition, object storage is often used to deliver static content for websites, which is also a common type of workload for Kubernetes.

  • Patch CDK #1: Build & Release

    Happens all the time. You often come across a super cool open source project you would gladly contribute but setting up the development environment and learning to patch and release your fixes puts you off. The Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK) is not an exception. This set of blog posts will shed some light on the most dark secrets of CDK.

  • Maxta adds Red Hat in plan to help customers dodge ‘VMware tax’

    Hyper-converged infrastructure maker Maxta has announced it now supports the Red Hat Virtualization hypervisor and can allow customers to migrate data from VMware to Red Hat or run VM in both environments.

  • ORock Technologies Named to Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service Provider Program
  • ​SUSE Studio merges with Open Build Service

    When SUSE first introduced SUSE Studio in 2010, it was a radical change. You could build your own Linux distribution without being a Linux expert. Today, we use custom Linux images inside containers, virtual machines (VM), and every cloud worth its name every day. So SUSE is updating SUSE Studio by merging it with its Open Build Service (OBS) to create a better tool for bundling packages with Linux distributions to deliver customized Linux images. The new product's name will be SUSE Studio Express.

  • When Microsoft met SUSE: This Windows-Linux partnership gets stronger every day [Ed: "Linux purists hated that partnership". Not Linux. Not purists. GNU. And people who value freedom.]

    Linux purists hated that partnership. But my, how things have changed! Today, Microsoft has joined The Linux Foundation; all the major Linux distributions, including Debian and Red Hat are available on Microsoft's Azure cloud; and Microsoft recently joined the Open Source Initiative.

SUSECon in Prague: CaaS and SDS

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SUSE

SUSE on Storage

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SUSE

SUSE Linux turns 25: From business distro leader to cloud power

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SUSE

Today, SUSE, the oldest Linux business still running, is a long, long way from its humble beginnings. Then, the first SUSE Linux was a German port of Patrick Volkerding's Slackware, the world's longest surviving Linux distribution.

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OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

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SUSE
HowTos

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing.

OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro?

Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Will Soon Get Linux Kernel 4.13 and GNOME 3.26 Desktop

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SUSE

openSUSE Project's Dominique Leuenberger is back with a new weekly report to inform OpenSuSE Tumbleweed users about the fact that a total of four snapshots have been published this week despite infrastructure's issues still not being fully addressed.

"I’m mainly astonished that there were still 3 (4) snapshots completed, considering the issues the infrastructure had during the last days (openQA had a corrupted disk/database, then download.opensuse.org disappeared on us)," said Dominique Leuenberger in his report.

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SUSE: SLE* 12 SP3 Released, Hillarys Adopts SUSE

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SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed and 'Cloud'

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get KDE Plasma 5.10.5 and KDE Applications 17.08

    If you're wondering why you haven't received any snapshots lately for your openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system, you should know that the openSUSE Linux devs had a hard time last week fixing various things and integrate the DNF package manager.

    openSUSE Project's Dominique Leuenberger recently informed the Tumbleweed community that the main reason behind the single snapshot released last week for the GNU/Linux distribution was that the DNF integration created metadata in the repository that was only valid for Tumbleweed systems, not Leap.

  • openSUSE Leap 42.3 Cloud Images Debut for Google Compute Engine, Microsoft Azure

    If you want to use the latest openSUSE Leap 42.3 open-source computer operating system on the cloud, you should know that the openSUSE Project released a set of cloud images for various of the most popular cloud services on the market.

    openSUSE Leap 42.3 launched for 64-bit and 32-bit platforms at the end of July 2017, based on the commercial SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack (SP) 3 operating system, and it's currently the latest stable release of the popular RPM-based Linux OS. It ships with the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel and up-to-date packages.

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