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OpenSUSE Releases Leap Beta

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SUSE
  • openSUSE 42.2 Pushed Back as Beta is Released
  • Throw a Beta Pizza Party
  • openSUSE Releases Leap Beta, Modifies Road Map

    Software testers and Linux enthusiasts can now get the Beta release of openSUSE Leap 42.2, which was released today.

    “Leap is for pragmatic and conservative technology adopters,” said Ludwig Nussel, the release manager for openSUSE Leap. “Testing the beta helps make Leap even more mature, so we encourage as many people as possible to test it.”

    openSUSE Leap focuses on well-established packages, like systemd 228 and Qt 5.6. The release day for the official version is scheduled for Nov. 16, which is one week after SUSECon.

OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Beta

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A new OpenSUSE Linux is coming to town, and it's all about stability

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SUSE

Linux users come in many shapes and sizes, but those in the business world typically steer clear of the bleeding edge. That's why the OpenSUSE project recently switched to a two-pronged development approach, with one version focused on constant updates and another on enterprise-grade stability. On Wednesday, the latter took a big step forward.

The first beta version of OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 is now available, giving enterprises and other stability-minded users the chance to check it out and get a taste of what's coming in the final release, which is due Nov. 16. This is the first key update to the Leap software since OpenSUSE adopted its dual-path approach late last year with OpenSUSE 42.1.

“Leap is for pragmatic and conservative technology adopters,” Ludwig Nussel, the release manager for OpenSUSE Leap, said in the software's official announcement. “Testing the beta helps make Leap even more mature, so we encourage as many people as possible to test it.”

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SUSE at LuLu and History

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SUSE
  • LuLu Group migrates to SUSE Linux Enterprise Server

    LuLu Group has selected SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications to help business managers faster identify and respond to new opportunities and competitive threats.

    Headquartered in the United Arab Emirates, the international retailer runs 124 outlets and operates in 31 countries. It welcomes more than 700,000 shoppers daily.

    Since starting its retail journey in the early 1990s, LuLu Group expanded its business aggressively and required advanced technology to optimise its business.

    Hence, it migrated from Solaris UNIX to SUSE Linux as platform for SAP solutions, reducing SAP landscape operating costs at least 20 percent.

  • SUSE's Role in the History of Linux and Open Source

    What role did SUSE play in the growth of Linux and the open source ecosystem? How did SUSE and other Linux-based operating systems evolve into the enterprise platforms they are today? Here's what SUSE employees had to say about Linux history in a recent interview.

    To help mark the anniversary of Linus Torvalds's release of Linux twenty-five years ago, I interviewed Meiki Chabowski, SUSE Documentation, and Markus Feilner, Strategist & Documentation Team Lead. Their answers, printed below, provide interesting perspective not only on the history of SUSE, but also of Linux and open source as a whole.

SUSE Linux and openSUSE Leap to Offer Better Support for ARM Systems Using EFI

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SUSE

The YaST development team at openSUSE and SUSE is reporting on the latest improvements that should be available in the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.2 and SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2 operating systems.

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From Ubuntu to openSUSE: Notes on Photographic Workflow Migration

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Ubuntu

There is no such thing as the best Linux distribution for photographers. With some tweaking, any mainstream distro can be turned into a solid platform for managing and processing photos. After all, digiKam, Darktable, gThumb, and other popular photographic tools can be easily deployed on practically any Linux distribution with a minimum of effort.

The devil is in the detail, though, and small things might require some adjustments. My recent migration from Ubuntu to openSUSE Tumbleweed is a case in point. Most of the tools I use in my photographic workflow are available in openSUSE’s official software repositories, so deploying them was a rather straightforward affair. But there were a few things that needed some tweaking.

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6 Reasons You Should Choose openSUSE and the Geeko

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SUSE

openSUSE is a staple of the Linux community. But even long-time open source advocates find themselves wondering what sets the distro apart. Lacking the clear direction of Ubuntu or the free software advocacy of Fedora, openSUSE can seem to lack vision.

Fortunately, that isn’t the case. There are good reasons openSUSE continues to attract users, and here are some of them. Maybe you will be the next person to fall in love with the Geeko.

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SUSE, IBM, and Servers

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GNU
Linux
Server
SUSE

SUSE Leftovers

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More on SUSE, Mirantis, Red Hat, and OpenStack

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Server
OSS
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Ubuntu Images for Oracle

  • Certified Ubuntu Images available on Oracle Bare Metal Cloud Service
    Certified Ubuntu images are now available in the Oracle Bare Metal Cloud Services, providing developers with compute options ranging from single to 16 OCPU virtual machines (VMs) to high-performance, dedicated bare metal compute instances. This is in addition to the image already offered on Oracle Compute Cloud Service and maintains the ability for enterprises to add Canonical-backed Ubuntu Advantage Support and Systems Management. Oracle and Canonical customers now have access to the latest Ubuntu features, compliance accreditations and security updates.
  • Canonical's Certified Ubuntu Images Land in Oracle's Bare Metal Cloud Service
    Canonical announced the official availability of Certified Ubuntu images in Oracle's Bare Metal Cloud Services, which accompany the images that the company already provides in the Oracle Compute Cloud Service. Canonical's Certified Ubuntu images in Oracle Bare Metal Cloud Services are a great addition because they promise to provide developers with dedicated, high-performance bare-metal compute instances, as well as virtual machines with up to 16 Oracle Compute Unit (OCPU). They also add the ability for Oracle's enterprise customers to access the latest and greatest Ubuntu features.

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