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World's three most powerful supercomputers run SUSE

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SUSE Supercomputers around the world are running on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server from Novell. According to TOP500, a project that tracks and detects trends in high-performance computing, SUSE Linux Enterprise is the Linux of choice on the world's largest HPC supercomputers today. Of the top 50 supercomputers worldwide, 40 percent are running on SUSE Linux Enterprise, including the top three.

Welcome to the Official openSUSE Forums!

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After announced on March 11, 2008, official openSUSE forums has been established and starting work for providing better support for openSUSE community on June 09, 2008. Forums merges 3 existing openSUSE forums,, and the openSUSE support forums at

People of openSUSE: Cornelius Schumacher

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SUSE Before openSUSE 11.0 GM get released next Thursday, we have the chance to meet Cornelius Schumacher - member of the incubation team, former Build Service developer, KDE vice president, and also the one who started writing down the openSUSE Guiding Principles.

An Exciting openSUSE Month

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SUSE It has been several months since I blogged about exciting openSUSE stuff happening (all about at the same time). The next few weeks enough long in the work things are on the home stretch to make June an openSUSE month:

Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.0: Compiz, with Dennis Kasprzyk

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SUSE There have been several changes with the Compiz setup in openSUSE 11.0, including both exciting and new features in Compiz Fusion, and extra developments behind-the-scenes which make running and managing Compiz easier. Today we will be taking a look at these, and catching up with Dennis ‘onestone’ Kasprzyk.

Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.0: Package Management, with Duncan Mac-Vicar

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SUSE In this article we will be covering all of the changes in and around the package management stack in the upcoming openSUSE 11.0. There have been a plethora of both visual and behind-the-scenes changes. We’ll also be talking to Duncan Mac-Vicar, YaST team lead, ZYpp and KDE developer, to find out a little more later.

Why does the retail box matter? (openSUSE 11.0 ready for pre-order)

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zonker.opensuse: Retail box? What’s up with that, right? We’re all about the free downloads over here, right? Yes, but… there’s a method to the madness of offering a retail box as well.

Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.0: New Installer, with Stephan Kulow

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SUSE I’m glad to announce the beginning of the Sneak Peaks at openSUSE 11.0 series! Over the next few weeks we will be taking a look at all of the exciting changes and improvements in openSUSE 11.0, with each article being followed by an interview with a developer in the field.

A Microsoft coupon bonanza for Novell? Not really

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Matt Asay: Ed Moltzen writes headlines an article with "Microsoft's Coupon Money Boosts Novell's Linux Numbers," which is true on its face, but not as interesting under the covers. Justin Steinman, Novell's head of Linux marketing, had told me a week ago

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 25

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SUSE Issue #25 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: People of openSUSE: Matthias Fehring, Interview: KDevelop and the openSUSE Build Service, and “OpenSUSE 11 RC1: The Mercedes-Benz to Ubuntu’s Volkswagen.”

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Supporting Software Freedom Conservancy

There are a number of important organizations in the Open Source and Free Software world that do tremendously valuable work. This includes groups such as the Linux Foundation, Free Software Foundation, Electronic Frontier Foundation, Apache Software Foundation, and others. Read more

Leftovers: OSS

  • Video: PBS Pro Workload Manager Goes Open Source
  • Turris Omnia: high-security, high-performance, open-source router
    An Indigogo campaign was recently launched for the Turis Omnia, promising backers a high-security, high-performance, open-source router. “With powerful hardware, Turris Omnia can handle gigabit traffic and still be able to do much more,” the company said. “You can use it as a home server, NAS, printserver, and it even has a virtual server built-in.”
  • IBM SystemML Machine Learning Technology Goes Open-Source
  • PuppetLabs Introduces Application Orchestration
    Everybody loves Puppet! Or at the very least, an awful lot of people USE Puppet and in the IT world, “love” is often best expressed by the opening of one’s wallet. I know, in the FOSS world wallets are unnecessary, and Puppet does indeed have an Open Source version. However, once one gets to enterprise-level computing, a tool designed for enterprise scale is preferable and usually there is a cost associated. Puppet was originally started as an open source project by Luke Kanies in 2005, essentially out of frustration with the other configuration management products available at the time. Their first commercial product was released in 2011, and today it is the most widely used configuration management tool in the world with about 30,000 companies running it. According to our own surveys, better than 60% of Linux Journal readers use some form of Puppet already and you must like it too as it regularly finishes at or near the top in Readers’ Choice awards.

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