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Helping Hands and openSUSE-Tutorials off to a great start

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SUSE

bryen.com" As some of you may know, several weeks ago, the openSUSE-GNOME Team launched the Helping Hands Project. We’ve had three sessions so far, and each time we host an event, the number of visitors to the #opensuse-gnome IRC channel increases.

A (very) brief visit with OpenSuse 11.0

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SUSE

kmandla.wordpress: I threatened to abandon my Arch Linux installation the other day, and that happened of course — Crux is recompiling as I type. In between those two I installed OpenSuse just for a lark, and because I don’t think I ever worked with it before.

One Year of openSUSE News

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Web
SUSE

opensuse.org: Exactly one year ago the openSUSE News site went live to provide users with the latest news and an event calendar. 19 authors posting under their own names and some one-time contributors wrote 246 stories (of which 122 were submitted to Digg) and filled the calendar with 170 entries.

Auto-Login in openSUSE: bad practice

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SUSE

justlookdifferent.com: In openSUSE there is a feature called Auto-Login. In short it means that the root can decide which user account should be started as default upon boot, without displaying a login prompt. Though for me it is a possible weakness in my security management.

People of openSUSE: Frank Sundermeyer

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Interviews
SUSE

opensuse.org: Former webservers administrator and presales consultant at S.u.S.E. he is currently working as a technical writer contributing to the openSUSE documentation and openSUSE web skin an wiki. Today you have the opportunity to meet Frank Sundermeyer!

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 31

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SUSE

opensuse.org: Issue #31 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: www.opensuse-tutorials.com, Pascal Bleser: Reporting Packman package bugs, and Jigish Gohil: New Compiz plugins.

Package Management Security on openSUSE

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SUSE

opensuse.org: There has been a report looking at package management security on various distributions that IMO was rather condensed in its summary report and therefore raised some false alarms for various distributions including openSUSE.

Unboxing openSUSE 11.0

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SUSE
Humor

zdnet.co.uk/blog: Yes! We got our hands on the hottest, most talked-about technological must-have... it is, of course, the boxed version of openSUSE 11.0! Prepare yourselves for an exclusive unboxfest:

People of openSUSE: Bryen Yunashko

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Interviews
SUSE

opensuse.org: Bryen Yunashko, a openSUSE member, is a recent acquisition to the openSUSE project who is involved in the openSUSE-GNOME and Marketing teams, coordinating the Helping Hands Project as also giving a hand at the accessibility of openSUSE.

Why openSUSE 11 is the Linux for me

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SUSE

sjvn: Recently, my colleague James Turner reviewed openSUSE 11 and he liked it. It's hard to tell from some of the notes he got back-shame on you people!--but he really did. I, on the other hand, love openSUSE 11.

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