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SUSE

openSUSE 11 Review

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SUSE

theunixgeek.blogspot: I know it's a day early, but I was able to get my hands on a copy of the release version of openSUSE 11 and I must say it's a really good distribution! Here are three lists of what I noticed, what I liked, and what I didn't like about the GNOME live CD.

openSUSE 11.0: The Plasma Desktop

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KDE
SUSE

kdedevelopers.org: openSUSE 11.0 will be finally released on Thursday! Smile The Sneak Peeks story about KDE has just been published and I want to follow up with a list how our Plasma desktop differs from the stock KDE 4.0 version.

Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.0: KDE with Stephan Binner

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KDE
Interviews
SUSE

opensuse.org: With openSUSE 11.0 just a few days away, it’s time to look at one of the stars of the show: KDE. In openSUSE 11.0, you get two KDEs for the price of one. Here we’ll take a look at what’s coming in KDE, and talk to one of openSUSE’s KDE contributors, Stephan Binner.

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Meets U.S. DoD Internet Protocol Standards

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SUSE

press release: Novell announced today it is the first Linux* vendor to appear on the U.S. Department of Defense Unified Capabilities Approved Products List, as SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 Service Pack 2 (SP2) has received the Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) Special Interoperability Certification from the department's Defense Information System Agency.

Also: Novell Delivers Optimized SUSE Linux Enterprise Performance for VMware Environments

People of openSUSE: Rupert Horstkötter

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Interviews
SUSE

opensuse.org: This week the openSUSE Project announced the launch of forums.opensuse.org, a merger of the three largest openSUSE forums. Continuing the openSUSE Forums euphoria we present you the Project Manager - Rupert Horstkötter.

openSUSE's Brockmeier sees distro coming into its own

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Interviews
SUSE

linux.com: Of all the community distributions, probably the least known is openSUSE. After two and a half years, the distro is not only still working out details about how its community operates -- including how its governing board is elected -- but also struggling to come out of the shadow of its corporate parent Novell, much as Fedora has emerged from its initial dominance by Red Hat.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 26

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SUSE

ssue #26 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this issue: People of openSUSE: Cornelius Schumacher, Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.0, and Tips and Tricks: Jigish Gohil: Useful openSUSE One-Click installs from command line.

How many ways can you install an RPM in OpenSUSE Linux?

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Software
SUSE

suseblog.com: I wanted to see how many ways I could install a package on OpenSUSE 10.3 (and 11.0, for that matter) without any help from any third-party package management tools that don’t come stock on a fresh OpenSUSE install.

World's three most powerful supercomputers run SUSE

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SUSE

supercomputingonline.com: Supercomputers around the world are running on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server from Novell. According to TOP500, a project that tracks and detects trends in high-performance computing, SUSE Linux Enterprise is the Linux of choice on the world's largest HPC supercomputers today. Of the top 50 supercomputers worldwide, 40 percent are running on SUSE Linux Enterprise, including the top three.

Welcome to the Official openSUSE Forums!

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Web
SUSE

After announced on March 11, 2008, official openSUSE forums has been established and starting work for providing better support for openSUSE community on June 09, 2008. Forums merges 3 existing openSUSE forums, suseforums.net, suselinuxsupport.de and the openSUSE support forums at forums.novell.com.

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