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SUSE

OpenSUSE Web Site Cracked, Tumbleweed Update

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Security
Web
SUSE

New systemd, Plasma 5.9 Arrive in Tumbleweed

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SUSE

The most recent snapshot, 20170131, added several new features with KDE’s Plasma 5.9.

“In our ongoing effort to make you more productive with Plasma, we added interactive previews to our notifications,” according to the release announcement on Plasma 5.9.

Additional features like icon widgets being created for applications and document when dragged to the desktop and several other new features like streamlined visuals, global menus and a new network configuration module can be found in the newest Plasma 5.9 version.

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openSUSE Leap 42.2 Hits the Cloud, You Can Now Use It on AWS Marketplace, Azure

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SUSE

openSUSE Project, through Douglas DeMaio, proudly announced the availability of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system as virtual images on various popular cloud providers.

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Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Installer RC2 Is Out, Now Supports Linux Kernel 4.9

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SUSE

Debian Project's Cyril Bruleboi is today announcing the availability of the second RC (Release Candidate) version of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Installer system.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of OpenSUSE Leap 42

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Linux
Reviews
SUSE

So here is the deal. If as the Everyday Linux User you are going to use openSUSE then you have to stick with it and in reality it should be the only operating system on your machine. Trying to dual boot will probably tie you up in knots.

After you have installed it and you have the most important non-free packages installed (Google Chrome being the main one) then you are likely to find openSUSE and GNOME a joy.

GNOME is really easy to use. It really is point and click and if you can get a handle on those keyboard shortcuts then life will be very easy indeed.

openSUSE is stable and it won't let you down with odd quirks that some other distributions have. It really is a case of taking that bit more time to get used to than you may have to with a Linux Mint for instance.

The good news is that there is a lot of documentation available and most things you will try have been tried before and there is usually a straight forward guide to follow to get to where you want to be.

All in all a positive experience.

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GeckoLinux Plasma: for Die Hard OpenSuSE fans

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Linux
Reviews
SUSE

GeckoLinux is a difficult thingie to understand. It was created to ease the life of people who want to explore OpenSuSE. Neither OpenSuSE nor GeckoLinux are actually easy distributions to deal with. Maybe I am just very subjective towards OpenSuSE, but that's my position.

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Hands-On: KaOS Linux and openSUSE Leap 42 on my new notebook

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OS
Linux
SUSE

In the previous three posts about this ASUS notebook, I have configured Windows 10 Home, installed openSUSE Tumbleweed, Manjaro and Debian GNU/Linux, and installed Fedora, Linux Mint and Ubuntu.

This time I am going to install the last two Linux distributions I am interested in: KaOS and openSUSE Leap. So far my experience with this inexpensive laptop has been very good. I hope that it continues that way.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed News

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2017/03 & 04

    As I did not publish an update last week, we have to span two weeks now. A lot has happened, many of those things are already shipped to you or are going to happen shortly. This review will touch the snapshots 0112, 0117, 0118, 0120, 0121, 0123, 0124 and 0125. A total of 8 snapshots.

  • openSUSE Devs Enhance Tumbleweed's Rolling Updates with New Package, Add RADV

    On January 26, 2017, openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio informed the Tumbleweed community about the latest package versions that landed last week through a total of five snapshots.

    Before we dwell on the details of the new updates for openSUSE Tumbleweed, we'd like to tell you about a new package called transactional-update, which the openSUSE developers added in the repositories of the GNU/Linux distribution to boost the rolling updates that are offered to users multiple times per week.

  • Install openSUSE Tumbleweed + KDE on MacBook 2015

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • New Package in Tumbleweed Enhances Rolling Updates

    Snapshots of openSUSE Tumbleweed are becoming more frequent once again and a new package in the rolling release should make the handling of updates easier.

    The new package called transactional-update was announced on the openSUSE Factory Mailing List on Jan. 21 and it allows for more fluent handling of updates and upgrades for a rolling release. Tumbleweed user are encourage to read the email and thread because the package has potential consequences for those using it if not used correctly.

  • New GeckoLinux Rolling and Static Editions Include the Calamares 3.0 Installer

    The developers of the openSUSE-based GeckoLinux operating system announced on January 25, 2017, the availability of new, updated versions of all supported editions.

    GeckoLinux Rolling 999.170124 and GeckoLinux Static 422.170124 editions are now available for download, shipping with the recently released Calamares 3.0 graphical installer, which adds countless fixes and improvements over the 2.4 series used in previous versions of GeckoLinux.

  • OpenSUSE board election suspended

    The election to pick two members of the openSUSE board has been suspended due to "technical problems". The problems do indeed appear to be technical in nature, with at least some voters being presented strange and confusing ballots. The election was restarted on the 21st in an unsuccessful attempt to fix the problems; now it is on indefinite hold. The current board will continue to serve, possibly deferring any major decisions, until the issue is resolved.

SUSE Leftovers

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More in Tux Machines

Librem 13: A few problems

I bought my old Lenovo Thinkpad X1 Carbon (1st gen.) when I entered grad school for my Master's program, in 2012. And after six years, the Thinkpad still ran well, but it was getting old, so I figured it was time for a change. I went back and forth about what kind of system should replace my laptop. I don't travel that much, so I figured a desktop would be better. And I could get a bigger screen. After going back and forth on the decision, I decided to get a laptop. I don't often travel with a laptop, but when I do, I prefer to use my primary system so I don't have to keep things synced. Of course, I wanted my system to run Linux. Purism is aimed at the Linux laptop market, and I wanted to support that. So I bought a Librem 13. I've had it now for about a week, and I love it now. But I'll be honest, I didn't love it right out of the box. I'd like to note two issues for folks who are thinking about getting a Librem laptop, so you aren't surprised like I was. Read more

Linux 4.17-rc7

So this week wasn't as calm as the previous weeks have been, but despite that I suspect this is the last rc. This week we had the whole "spectre v4" thing, and yes, the fallout from that shows up as part of the patch and commit log. But it's not actually dominant: the patch is pretty evenly one third arch updates, one third networking updates, and one third "rest". The arch updates are largely - although not exclusively - spectre v4. The networking stuff is mostly network drivers, but there's some core networking too. And "the rest" is just that - misc drivers (rdma, gpu, other), documentation, some vfs, vm, bpf, tooling.. The bulk of it is really pretty trivial one-liners, and nothing looks particularly scary. Let's see how next week looks, but if nothing really happens I suspect we can make do without an rc8. Shortlog appended as usual. Go out and test. Read more

Today in Techrights

Libre Hardware

  • Flash your Libre Firmware with a Libre Programmer
    Whether or not you personally agree with all the ideals of the Free Software Foundation (FSF), you’ve got to give them credit: they don’t mess around. They started by laying the groundwork for a free and open source operating system, then once that dream was realized, started pushing the idea of replacing proprietary BIOS firmware with an open alternative such as Libreboot. But apparently, even that’s not enough, as there’s still more freedom to be had. We’re playing 4D Libre Chess now, folks. [...] Luckily, the FSF has just awarded the Zerocat Chipflasher their “Respects Your Freedom” certification, meaning every element of the product is released under a free license for your hacking enjoyment.
  • Coreboot Picks Up Support For Another Eight Year Old Intel Motherboard
    If by chance you happen to have an Intel DG41WV motherboard, it's now supported by mainline Coreboot so you can free the system down to the BIOS. The DG41WV motherboard comes from the LGA-775 days with an Intel G41 Eaglelake chipset back when DDR3-1066 was great, motherboards topped out with 4GB of RAM, four USB 2.0 ports were suitable, and motherboard PCBs were much less fashionable. The DG41WV was a micro-ATX board and a decent choice for the times to pair with a CPU like the Core 2 Duo or Core 2 Quad.