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SUSE

OpenSUSE 42.2 Merges Best Features of Enterprise, Community Models

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Reviews
SUSE

In the world of Linux distributions, users are often faced with the option of choosing an enterprise-grade distribution or a community distribution. With the openSUSE Leap approach, SUSE is attempting to merge the best of both the enterprise and community models into a new type of Linux distribution. In the pure community-first model the upstream open-source code is packaged in a distribution, which can then be further hardened to eventually produce an enterprise-grade Linux product. The open-source openSUSE Leap 42.2 Linux distribution became generally available on Nov. 16 and takes a different approach. Code from the SUSE Linux Enterprise Service Pack 2 release, which debuted on Nov. 8, is now in the freely available openSUSE Leap 42.2 update. As part of its enterprise community stability focus, openSUSE Leap benefits from the Linux 4.4 Long Term Support Kernel (LTS). SUSE expects to support openSUSE Leap releases for 36 months. The new release also includes the latest in open-source application packages with LibreOffice and Firefox as well as developer and graphics tools. This slide show eWEEK takes a look at some of the features in the new openSUSE 42.2 Linux operating system release.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed News

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/46

    Now this is a week I call fully rolling. There was a full 7 snapshots since the last review – which is about the maximum we can do in a week with one snapshot per day (or we have to change the versioning to not be only ‘date’ based). So, this review is about the snapshots {20161110..20161116}.

  • When Trying Out Tumbleweed, It's Easy To See Why OpenSUSE Leap Disabled Nouveau

    I've been running some fresh benchmarks of the recently released openSUSE Leap 42.2 compared to the rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed and friends. Those benchmarks will be posted shortly, but after using the Nouveau experience on Tumbleweed I found the need to comment.

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Leap 42.2 Linux Now Officially Available for PowerPC64le Architectures

    Just one day after the official release of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system, Michel Normand from the openSUSE Project was proud to announce on November 17, 2016, the availability of the PowerPC port.

    Yes, you're reading that right, while many other popular GNU/Linux distributions are in discussions to deprecate support for the PowerPC (PPC) hardware architecture, including Debian Project and Canonical for their upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" and Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) releases, it looks like openSUSE still support it.

  • Organize an openSUSE Leap 42.2 Release Party

    Having a party to celebrate an achievement is always great and the openSUSE community knows how to party; just look at all the fun we have at openSUSE conferences and summits.

    With the release of openSUSE Leap 42.2, a release party is in order. Selecting a good date and having some goodies to pass out to the party requires some planning. The checklist below can help with planning the release party, but the most important thing if you plan on having a party is to email ddemaio (at) suse.de well before the party to get some open-source goodies to give away. Please include “Leap 42.2” Party in the subject line and include a mailing address.

  • Preparing for openSUSE 42.2

openSUSE 13.2 Linux Operating System to Reach End of Life on January 16, 2017

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SUSE

On November 17, 2016, it appears that Marcus Meissner from the openSUSE Project sent an advanced discontinuation notice for users of the openSUSE 13.2 Linux operating system.

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Enterprise Linux Showdown: SUSE Linux

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Linux
SUSE

SUSE combines tried and tested tools and build methodologies that make this Linux offering a favorite in corporate environments. At the same time, and thanks to openSUSE and the online services built around it, SUSE Linux can also be daring and exciting. Although it has had low points over its long history, the Linux community is lucky that SUSE Linux is still with us and still going strong.

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SUSE releases SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2

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SUSE

While I was off fighting viruses, SUSE released an update to its SUSE Linux Enterprise 12, a popular business Linux operating environment. The focus of this service pack appears to be accelerating network performance, enhancing support for SAP applications and HANA, improving support for IBM Power architecture systems and other important improvements.

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  • openSUSE Leap 42.2 Officially Released, Includes GNOME 3.20 & KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS

    The openSUSE Project had the pleasure of informing Softpedia today, November 16, 2016, about the general availability of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system for personal computers.

    Designed to offer users only well-established Open Source and GNU/Linux technologies, and built using the source code from the recently released SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLE) 12 Service Pack 2 (SP2) operating system, the second major update to the openSUSE Leap 42 open-source and free distribution is here after being in development for the past six months. There are numerous new features and updated components in openSUSE Leap 42.2, some of which Tumbleweed users are already enjoying.

  • Optimal Release for Linux Professionals Arrives with openSUSE Leap 42.2

    Members of the openSUSE Project are pleased to announce the release of the next minor version of Leap; openSUSE Leap 42.2! Leap is made to give stability-minded users and conservative technology adopters peace of mind. openSUSE Leap 42.2 is powered by the Linux 4.4 Long-Term-Support (LTS) kernel and is a secure, stable and reliable server operating system for deploying IT services in physical, virtual or cloud environments.

    A selective process of including well-established packages in openSUSE Leap 42.2 gives new meaning to the term Linux Optimization; openSUSE Leap is simply the safe choice that offers Linux professionals a user-friendly desktop and a feature-rich server environment.

  • OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Arrives

    Hitting the web this morning is the official release of openSUSE Leap 42.2.

    OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 makes use of the older Linux 4.4 kernel due to its LTS status, makes use of the KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop by default, and a wide variety of other package updates. OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 continues to be derived from SUSE Linux Enterprise.

SUSE advances its open-source storage system

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SUSE

Besides announcing its next version of Ceph-powered SUSE Enterprise Storage, SUSE has bought openATTIC, the open-source Ceph and storage management framework.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE

SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2 arrives

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SUSE

SUSE has long been a business Linux for business. With the arrival of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLES) 12 Service Pack 2 , the first major update since last year, SUSE is staying the corporate Linux course.

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Tyson Foods Honored as SUSE Customer of the Year

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SUSE

Every year, SUSE honors 4 companies worldwide, one in each region of the globe: Latin America, APAC, EMEA and North America. Recipient companies are recognized for “defining the future:” using SUSE open source solutions for IT transformation, increased business agility and continuity. 2016 award recipients are :

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More in Tux Machines

FATHOM releases Crystallon

  • FATHOM releases Crystallon, an open-source software for lattice-based design
    Lattice structures are integral to 3D printed designs, and Aaron Porterfield, an industrial designer at additive manufacturing service bureau FATHOM, has developed Crystallon, an open source project for shaping them into structures.
  • FATHOM Introduces Open Source Software Project for Generating 3D Lattice Structures
    California-based FATHOM, which expanded its on-site managed services and announced important partnerships with Stratasys and Desktop Metal last year, is introducing a fascinating new open source project called Crystallon, which uses Rhino and Grasshopper3D to create lattice structures. FATHOM industrial designer Aaron Porterfield, also an Instructables member, developed the project as an alternative to designing lattices with commercially available software. He joined the company’s design and engineering team three years ago, and is often a featured speaker for its Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) Training Program – and as the project developer, who better to explain the Crystallon project?

Kernel and Graphics: Machine Learning, Mesa, Wayland/Mir, AMDGPU

  • AI-Powered / Machine Learning Linux Performance Tuning Is Now A Thing
    A year and a half ago I wrote about a start-up working on dynamically-tuned, self-optimizing Linux servers. That company is now known as Concertio and they just launched their "AI powered" toolkit for IT administrators and performance engineers to optimize their server performance. Concertio Optimizer Studio is their product making use of machine learning that aims to optimize Linux systems with Intel CPUs for peak performance by scoping out the impact of hundreds of different tunables for trying to deliver an optimal configuration package for that workload on that hardware.
  • Pengutronix Gets Open-Source 3D Working On MX8M/GC7000 Hardware
    We've known that Pengutronix developers had been working on i.MX8M / GC7000 graphics support within their Etnaviv open-source driver stack from initial patches posted in January. Those patches back at the start of the year were for the DRM kernel driver, but it turns out they have already got basic 3D acceleration working.
  • SDL Now Disables Mir By Default In Favor Of Wayland Compatibility
    With Mir focusing on Wayland compatibility now, toolkits and other software making direct use of Mir's APIs can begin making use of any existing Wayland back-end instead. GTK4 drops the Mir back-end since the same can be achieved with the Wayland compatibility and now SDL is now making a similar move.
  • Mesa 18.1 Receives OpenGL 3.1 With ARB_compatibility For Gallium3D Drivers
    Going back to last October, Marek of AMD's open-source driver team has been working on ARB_compatibility support for Mesa with a focus on RadeonSI/Gallium3D. Today that work was finally merged. The ARB_compatibility support allows use of deprecated/removed features of OpenGL by newer versions of the specification. ARB_compatibility is particularly useful for OpenGL workstation users where there are many applications notorious for relying upon compatibility contexts / deprecated GL functionality. But ARB_compatibility is also used by a handful of Linux games too.
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.17 Exposes WattMan Features, GPU Voltage/Power Via Hwmon
    AMD's Alex Deucher today sent in the first pull request to DRM-Next of AMDGPU (and Radeon) DRM driver feature material that will in turn be merged with the Linux 4.17 kernel down the road. There's some fun features for AMDGPU users coming with this next kernel! First up, Linux is finally getting some WattMan-like functionality after it's been available via the Windows Radeon Software driver since 2016. WattMan allows for more fine-tuning of GPU clocks, voltages, and more for trying to maximize the power efficiency. See the aforelinked article for details but currently without any GUI panel for tweaking all of the driver tunables, this WattMan-like support needs to be toggled from the command-line.

Wine and Ganes: World of Warcraft, Farm Together, Madcap Castle, Cityglitch

Security Leftovers