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SUSE

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • SoftIron CEO announces new ARM server running openSUSE Leap

    The keynote speaker for the openSUSE Conference today and Chief Executive Officer of SoftIron, Norman Fraser, Ph.D., made a big announcement about the release of a new powerful ARM server that comes with essential tools to get the 64-bit ARM development up and running, out-of-the-box.

  • Watch The Videos From This Year's OpenSUSE Conference

    From 22 to 26 June, the openSUSE Conference has been taking place in Nürnberg. There's been live video streams for those not in Bavaria while now the video recordings are being uploaded for your enjoyment at your convenience.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux Is Now Entirely Built Using GCC 6 as Compiler

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SUSE

Last week, we reported on the fact that the GCC 6 migration for the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system was almost over and that the next snapshot would be a massive one moving everything to the GCC 6 compiler.

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openSUSE Leap 42.2 Alpha 2 Released with a Full GNOME 3.20 Update, Mesa 11.2

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SUSE

openSUSE Project's Ludwig Nussel was happy to announce the release of the second Alpha milestone towards the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system, just in time for the openSUSE Conference.

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SUSE, Intel collaborate on HPC stack

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SUSE

The Germany-based GNU/Linux company SUSE has teamed up with Intel with the latter to offer its server distribution, which is optimised for high-performance computing (HPC), as an option on the Intel HPC Orchestrator, an HPC system software stack.

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GCC 6 Imminent for openSUSE Tumbleweed, openSUSE Leap 42.2 Alpha 2 Coming Soon

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SUSE

Today, June 15, 2016, the openSUSE Tumbleweed maintainers have informed the community that the long-anticipated GCC 6 compiler is imminent for the rolling operating system.

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ownCloud, Nextcloud, and OpenSUSE

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SUSE
  • ownCloud Summit at openSUSE Conference Cancelled

    The openSUSE project announces the immediate cancellation of the ownCloud Summit that was scheduled to take place during the openSUSE Conference in two weeks.

    The summit was scheduled for June 22 – 23.

    Given the ownCloud community has forked, openSUSE sought an amicable solution so that both communities could take part in the openSUSE conference. As this was found to not be possible, the openSUSE Board made the decision to cancel the summit.

  • Nextcloud hackweek and open BBQ!

    Yesterday we kicked off a meeting in Stuttgart to discuss Nextcloud and get work done. A first result is the establishment of the new Server repository on Github (and more repositories!) and we'll share other things on the forums and in Github issues the coming days. The real important news however is that we decided to organize a BBQ!

  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 20

    The latest Scrum sprint of the YaST team was shorter than the average three weeks and also a little bit “under-powered” with more people on vacation or sick leave than usual. The bright side of shorter sprints is that you don’t have to wait three full weeks to get an update on the status. Here you have it!

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Getting Linux Kernel 4.6.1, LibreOffice 5.2, and GCC 6 Soon

    On June 6, 2016, openSUSE Project's Dominique Leuenberger wrote on the openSUSE Tumbleweed's mailing list a quick review of the major software updates that landed in the week that just passed for the rolling release distribution.

    Those of you who are currently using the openSUSE Tumbleweed OS on your personal computers, are aware of the fact that there were a total of four snapshots released last week, which brought many exciting new GNU/Linux technologies, such as the Linux 4.6 kernel, the KDE Applications 16.04.1 software suite for the KDE Plasma 5.6 desktop environment, and the Perl 5.24.0 packages.

  • openSUSE's Open Build Service 2.7 Adds Better Integration of External Resources

    openSUSE Project, through Henne Vogelsang, announced on June 6, 2016, the general availability of the version 2.7 of the project's Open Build Service (OBS) software distribution solution.

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Open Build Service version 2.7 released

    We are happy to announce the availability of the Open Build Service Version 2.7! Three large features around the topic of integrating external resources made it into this release. We worked on automatic tracking of moving repositories of development versions like Fedora Rawhide, distribution updates or rolling Linux releases like Arch. A change to the OBS git integration to enable developers to work on continuous builds. And last but not least an experimental KIWI import that can be used to easily migrate your images from SUSE studio.

  • ​SUSE Enterprise Storage 3 released for serious storage work

    When Red Hat bought Ceph's parent company Inktank, people were worried Red Hat would keep Ceph's object store and file system to itself. Then, Red Hat announced it would let others help decide on Ceph's future. Now, SUSE, a rival Linux power, is taking Red Hat up on this with its Ceph-supporting release of SUSE Enterprise Storage 3.

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/22
  • openSUSE.Asia 2016 announced from Indonesia

    We are happy to announce the third openSUSE.Asia Summit. The openSUSE.Asia Summit 2016 will take place at Sunan Kalijaga State Islamic University in Yogyakarta, Indonesia on October 1st and 2nd, 2016.

    The summit is a great way for both openSUSE contributors, and, users to meet each other and have fun. The openSUSE community will get together, share their experiences, and, learn free and open source technologies.

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • Google Summer of Code Student Implementing Payment Feature

    Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Rishabh Saxena. Rishabh is assisting with openSUSE’s Open Source Event Management during the Google Summer of Code.

  • Debugger in YaST

    Until now debugging the YaST installation was usually done by checking the y2log. If you needed more details you would add more log calls.

    This is inconvenient and takes too much time. For better debugging a real debugger would be nice…

  • May “installs” — Tumbleweed and 42.2 Alpha1

    It’s early June, and I still have not reported a couple of “installs” that I did in May. So better late than never.

    I used scare quotes around “install” because I did not actually install Tumbleweed in May, though I did do some install tests. There’s not a lot to report, so this will be a short post.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Chef expands its cloud and container menu
    Chef, a leading DevOps company, announced at ChefConf 2017 that it was adding new capabilities to it flagship Continous Automation/DevOps program, Chef Automate. This enables enterprises to transition from server- and virtual machine- (VM) based IT systems to cloud-native and container-first environments with consistent automation and DevOps practices.
  • Nextcloud 12: The bigger, better, in-house small business cloud
    It's not even been a year since Frank Karlitschek, co-founder and former CTO of ownCloud, forked ownCloud into Nextcloud. Since then, this do-it-yourself, open-source Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud has become increasingly popular. Now, its latest version, Nextcloud 12, the program is adding more Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) features.
  • The Spirit of Open Source
  • What happened to Mastodon after its moment in the spotlight?
    More than a month later, the buzz over Mastodon has quieted. But though it may not be making headlines, the service continues to grow.
  • Mozilla: One Step Closer to a Closed Internet
    We’re deeply disheartened. Today’s FCC vote to repeal and replace net neutrality protections brings us one step closer to a closed internet. Although it is sometimes hard to describe the “real” impacts of these decisions, this one is easy: this decision leads to an internet that benefits Internet Service Providers (ISPs), not users, and erodes free speech, competition, innovation and user choice.
  • The eternal battle for OpenStack's soul will conclude in three years. Again
    After six years as a formal project, OpenStack has survived numerous raids and famines and now finds itself in a not-too-weird space of being boring, on-premises infrastructure. That is, “boring” in the good way of focusing on what users want and fixing existing problems, only chasing shiny objects – cough, PaaS, cough, containers, cough, orchestration – as much as needed.
  • With version 2.0, Crate.io’s database tools put an emphasis on IoT
    Crate.io, the winner of our Disrupt Europe 2014 Battlefield, is launching version 2.0 of its CrateDB database today. The tool, which is available in both an open source and enterprise version, started out as a general-purpose but highly scalable SQL database. Over time, though, the team found that many of its customers were using the service for managing their machine data and, unsurprisingly, decided to focus its efforts on better supporting those clients.
  • NewSQL CockroachDB Ready for Prime Time
    There's a new open source database on the block. Although it has a name that will most likely make you cringe for the first dozen or so times you hear it -- CockroachDB -- I have a feeling that if it isn't already on your radar, it will be soon.
  • Windows 10 S Won't Support Fedora, SUSE Linux, and Ubuntu
  • Manage Linux servers with a Windows admin's toolkit [Ed: Well, the solution is learning GNU tools, not relying on proprietary stuff with back doors from Microsoft]
  • FreeBSD quarterly status report
  • openbsd changes of note 622
  • Book Review: Relayd and Httpd Mastery

    Overall an excellent book which is typical Michael W Lucas writing style. Easy to follow, clear cut instructions, and tons of new stuff to learn. If one must use OpenBSD or FreeBSD, then the chances are high that one will stick with the defaults that come with OpenBSD. No need to use fat Apache, or Nginx/Lighttpd web server especially when httpd and relayd audited for security by OpenBSD core team.

  • Guix System Distribution (GuixSD) 0.13.0 GNU/Linux OS Supports 64-bit ARM CPUs
    The GNU Guix and GuixSD 0.13.0 releases are here about five months after the December 2016 launch of version 0.12.0, and it appears to be a major milestone implementing a few important changes. First off, this release can now be installed on computers powered by AArch64 (64-bit ARM) processors.
  • The Good And Bad In WikiTribune, Wikipedia Founder's Open-Source News Site
    Countering the fake news threat has become a real challenge for social media platforms, which also serve as avenues of news dissemination along with the traditional media outlets.
  • Android Studio 3.0 Canary 1
  • Jaded by Java? Android now supports Kotlin programming language
  • Rcpp 0.12.11: Loads of goodies
    The elevent update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp landed on CRAN yesterday following the initial upload on the weekend, and the Debian package and Windows binaries should follow as usual. The 0.12.11 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, the 0.12.6 release in July, the 0.12.7 release in September, the 0.12.8 release in November, the 0.12.9 release in January, and the 0.12.10.release in March --- making it the fifteenth release at the steady and predictable bi-montly release frequency.
  • Master Haskell Programming with Free Books
    Haskell is a standardized, general-purpose, polymorphically statically typed, lazy, purely functional language, very different from many programming languages. Recent innovations include static polymorphic typing, higher-order functions, user-definable algebraic data types, a module system, and more. It has built-in concurrency and parallelism, debuggers, profilers, rich libraries and an active community, with approximately 5,400 third-party open source libraries and tools.
  • [Older] Manifesto: Rules for standards-makers

    If we work together on a project based on open tech, these are the principles I will try to stick to. I wanted to put all this in one place, so I can pass it along to future software developers.

Events and Talks

LibreOffice News

  • LibreOffice leverages Google’s OSS-Fuzz to improve quality of office suite
  • LibreOffice leverages Google’s OSS-Fuzz to improve quality of office suite
    For the last five months, The Document Foundation has made use of OSS-Fuzz, Google’s effort to make open source software more secure and stable, to further improve the quality and reliability of LibreOffice’s source code. Developers have used the continuous and automated fuzzing process, which often catches issues just hours after they appear in the upstream code repository, to solve bugs – and potential security issues – before the next binary release.LibreOffice is the first free office suite in the marketplace to leverage Google’s OSS-Fuzz. The service, which is associated with other source code scanning tools such as Coverity, has been integrated into LibreOffice’s security processes – under Red Hat’s leadership – to significantly improve the quality of the source code.
  • Please participate in a survey about page margins

    Margins specify the amount of space to leave between the edges of the page and the document text. You can define it for the left/inner, right/outer, top and bottom side individually. Page margins are defined by default at 0.79″ respectively 2cm on each side in LibreOffice Writer (located under Format > Page). These default values are under close scrutiny now.

Ubuntu Leftovers: Security, Unity, Internet, and Derivatives