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SUSE

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Getting Qt 5.6, Linux Kernel 4.6, and KDE Plasma 5.6.4 Soon

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SUSE

Today, May 18, openSUSE developer Douglas DeMaio has informed the community about the new features that are about to land in the software repositories of openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling GNU/Linux operating system.

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SUSE Linux Enterprise Live Patching Promises 100% Uptime for Businesses

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SUSE

Today, May 17, 2016, SUSE, a pioneer in open source software and the maker of the SUSE Linux operating system, has had the great pleasure of announcing the availability of SUSE Linux Enterprise Live Patching.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get KDE Plasma 5.6.3, Firefox 46 & Linux Kernel 4.5.3

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SUSE

openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio today, May 11, 2016, informed the openSUSE Tumbleweed community about the latest GNU/Linux technologies that landed in the rolling release operating system.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Prepares for GCC 6, Users Get Linux Kernel 4.5.2, Mesa 11.2

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SUSE

The openSUSE Project today, May 4, 2016, published details about the latest major open-source components that landed in the main software repositories of the openSUSE Tumbleweed distro recently.

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5 things that set openSUSE, elementary OS and Ubuntu apart

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SUSE
Ubuntu

I am a huge fan of openSUSE and Arch Linux; those are the two distributions that I run on my main system. But I don't belong to any fan-base; I also run some of the major Linux distributions on my machines, to keep an eye on their development.

One distribution that’s getting a lot of attention lately is elementary OS. I have been using it on a virtual machine and I love what they are doing. Then there is Ubuntu, one of the most popular Linux-based operating systems. The latest release of Ubuntu was announced this week and since I use all three in some capacity, I decided to see where they stand against each other.

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SUSE Manager 3

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SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get KDE Plasma 5.6.2, Frameworks 5.21 and Mesa 11.2.0

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SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed users received many snapshots during the last two weeks, since the beginning of the April, so it's time to keep you guys up to speed with what's new in the rolling GNU/Linux distribution.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Free software equalizes economic segregation in schools

    I, along with other members of the openSUSE community, were fortunate enough to attend Rather’s keynote speech. Rather, who came from a small farming town in Texas and whose father was a ditch digger, credits self-determination, his wife and great teachers, who believe and care about students, as a key to his prosperity.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/14 & 15

    It seems to be difficult in the last weeks to find really interesting new features to write about. The fact that Plasma 5.6 and GNOME 3.20 are already available takes a lot of wind out of the sails. So a request to all of you: keep the things coming

  • openSUSE debug repository

    I am running openSUSE Leap 42.1 in a Vagrant box and while I had to debug a small executable file, I came across a message prompting me to install the glibc-debuginfo-2.19-19.1.x86_64 package.

  • Git work flows in the upcoming 2.7 release

    The upcoming Open Build Service (OBS) 2.7 release will deliver massive improvements to the way we are dealing with git sources for builds.

    OBS was designed for Linux distribution creation, not software development. In your typical distribution creation work flow you get a new upstream release in the form of a tar ball from time to time, and you add patches on top of that for local fixes. Nowadays the OBS is also used for development of software projects not in the context of a distribution. That work flow has completely different requirements: for every commit a new build, developers want continuous builds.

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.