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SUSE

openSUSE Linux Is Being Ported to IBM z Systems and LinuxONE

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SUSE

Berthold Gunreben of SUSE Linux informed the openSUSE community about the upcoming availability of the openSUSE Linux operating system for the IBM z Systems architecture.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE

SUSE Linux Gets a New CTO

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SUSE

SUSE named a new CTO today, with Dr. Thomas Di Giacomo taking on the the role of Chief Technology Officer, reporting to CEO Nils Brauckmann.

The last time I personally ever spoke to a SUSE CTO was way back in 2009, when Markus SUSERex (now CEO of OwnCloud) held the job, and SUSE was still part of Novell.

Giacomo joins SUSE from Swisscom Hospitality Services, where he was CTO and vice president of innovation. Giacomo has as a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Geneva, where he was a senior researcher

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SUSE Phone, openSUSE Conference

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SUSE
  • Will openSUSE develop the SUSE Phone?

    I am currently in the process of interviewing the leaders of every Linux distribution on the planet, with the goal of helping us get to know the people behind the projects better. Having just wrapped up discussions with the heads of both elementary and Fedora (and others in the works) I decided it was time to talk about openSUSE.

    This gets a little tricky as, earlier this year, I was elected to a position on the openSUSE board. I thought, for a moment, about either skipping the openSUSE interview or having someone else conduct it – to avoid the perception of bias.

  • Update on openSUSE Conference

    There are 15 more days to submit a proposal for the openSUSE Conference in Nuremberg June 22 – 26, so I would like to provide an update to the community about the conference.

    As you might already be aware, there will be SaltStack, ownCloud, Kolab and SUSE Labs summits during the conference and we also plan on having a program for kids on Saturday, June 25.

openSUSE Build Service and GNOME 3.20

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SUSE

RapidDisk 4.0 now available.

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Linux
News
Red Hat
Server
Debian
SUSE
Ubuntu

RapidDisk is an open source and enhanced Linux RAM drive solution. Dynamically create, resize, and remove RAM drives. Or map those same RAM drives as a cache to slower data volumes. RapidDisk consists of a collection of kernel modules, an administration utility, High Availability scripts, and a RESTful API for third party integration.

Could Novell have become a Linux player?

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GNU
Linux
SUSE

Ron Hovsepian took over as chief and presided over the infamous patent-licensing deal with Microsoft in November 2006 that made Novell a pariah in the open source community. That was the beginning of the end.

In 2010, Novell was bought by the Attachmate Group who, showing some wisdom, relocated SUSE back to Nuremberg to be run as an independent unit. Micro Focus became the owner of the Attachmate Group in late 2014 and SUSE continued to stay in Nuremberg.

SUSE, on its own, has about a third of the revenue that Red Hat does but with a parent like Novell it could well have been much more. When it was run from within Novell, SUSE was just about breaking even.

Could there have been another big Linux competitor to Red Hat? It's a pity that personality conflicts got in the way of us never knowing for certain.

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4 Truths From Inside Open Source Marketing at SUSE

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OSS
SUSE

Being in marketing within a company focused on, and dedicated to, Open Source (and Free) software is an interesting thing; Open Source projects are not often associated with being particularly great at marketing and communication. The focus tends to be on the software being developed, with a mindset to let the quality of the software speak for itself. That doesn’t negate the need for great communication and marketing, though. (Even truly amazing software won’t have a lot of users if nobody knows it exists.)

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets KDE Plasma 5.5.5, Python 3.5.1 to Arrive Very Soon

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SUSE

It looks like the new workers Tumbleweed received from SUSE are doing a very good job, as the rolling release openSUSE variant gets more snapshots than ever, which include all the latest GNU/Linux technologies.

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Also: openSUSE Is Now Looking for a Host City for Its openSUSE.Asia Summit 2016 Event

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Development News

Security Leftovers

  • How To Improve The Linux System’s Security Using Firejail
    As you already know, Linux kernel is secure by default. But, it doesn’t mean that the softwares on the Linux system are completely secure. Say for example, there is a possibility that any add-ons on your web browser may cause some serious security issues. While doing financial transactions over internet, some key logger may be active in browser which you are not aware of. Even though, we can’t completely give the bullet-proof security to our Linux box, we still can add an extra pinch of security using an application called Firejail. It is a security utility which can sandbox any such application and let it to run in a controlled environment. To put this simply, Firejail is a SUID (Set owner User ID up on execution) program that reduces the risk of security breaches by restricting the running environment of untrusted applications.
  • “Httpd and Relayd Mastery” off to copyedit
  • Kalyna Block Cipher

Containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs

  • Setting the Record Straight: containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs
    I’m tired of having the same conversation over and over again with people so I figured I would put it into a blog post. Many people ask me if I have tried or what I think of Solaris Zones / BSD Jails. The answer is simply: I have tried them and I definitely like them. The conversation then heads towards them telling me how Zones and Jails are far superior to containers and that I should basically just give up with Linux containers and use VMs. Which to be honest is a bit forward to someone who has spent a large portion of her career working with containers and trying to make containers more secure. Here is what I tell them:
  • [Old] Hadoop Has Failed Us, Tech Experts Say

    The Hadoop community has so far failed to account for the poor performance and high complexity of Hadoop, Johnson says. “The Hadoop ecosystem is still basically in the hands of a small number of experts,” he says. “If you have that power and you’ve learned know how to use these tools and you’re programmer, then this thing is super powerful. But there aren’t a lot of those people. I’ve read all these things how we need another million data scientists in the world, which I think means our tools aren’t very good.”