Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.8.10, VirtualBox 5.1.10 Lands

Filed under
SUSE

Today, December 1, 2016, openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio gladly informed the community of the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system about the updated packages that landed in the repositories.

Read more

SUSE buys HPE’s OpenStack and Cloud Foundry assets

Filed under
SUSE

SUSE, which probably is best known for its Linux distribution, has long been a quiet but persistent player in the OpenStack ecosystem. Over the last few months, though, the German company has also emerged as one of the stronger competitors in this world, especially now that we are seeing a good bit of consolidation around OpenStack.

Today, SUSE announced that it is acquiring OpenStack and Cloud Foundry (the Platform-as-a-Service to OpenStack’s Infrastructure-as-a-Service) assets and talent from the troubled HPE. This follows HPE’s decision to sell off (or “spin-merge” in HPE’s own language) its software business (including Autonomy, which HP bought for $11 billion, followed by a $9 billion write-off) to Micro Focus. And to bring this full circle: Micro Focus also owns SUSE, and SUSE is now picking up HPE’s OpenStack and Cloud Foundry assets.

Read more

Also: SUSE acquires HPE OpenStack and Cloud Foundry assets

openSUSE 42.2 Leap

Filed under
SUSE

openSUSE is a community distribution which shares code and infrastructure with SUSE Linux Enterprise. The openSUSE distribution is available in two editions. The first is a stable, point release edition with a conservative base called Leap. The second edition is an experimental rolling release called Tumbleweed. The openSUSE project recently released a new update to the Leap edition, launching openSUSE 42.2 Leap in mid-November. Leap editions receive approximately three years of security updates and minor point releases are published about once per year. The new 42.2 release includes a long term support kernel (Linux 4.4) and KDE's Plasma 5.8 desktop which is also supposed to receive long term support from its upstream project.

openSUSE 42.2 is available primarily for 64-bit x86 computers. There are ARM ports available, but they need to be tracked down through the project's wiki and are not available through the main Download page. The new release is available in two builds, a 4.1GB DVD and a 95MB net-install disc. I opted to download the larger of the two ISO files for my trial.

Read more

HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.11 Supports openSUSE Leap 42.2 and Fedora 25

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
SUSE

Today, November 28, 2016, the developers behind the HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) software, an open source print, scan and fax driver solution for HP printers and scanners on Linux-based operating systems, announced the release of HPLIP 3.16.11.

Read more

openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets Linux Kernel 4.8.9, CMake 3.7, Firefox 50 & Mesa 13.0.1

Filed under
SUSE

Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling distribution should be happy to hear that the repositories were flooded this week with hundreds of updated packages.

Read more

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • Tumbleweed Delivers Incredible Snapshot Streak, Newest Kernel

    News of Linux releases are getting most of the headlines during November while snapshots of openSUSE Tumbleweed have subtly been flying under the radar.

    Other than Nov. 3 and Nov. 6, openSUSE Tumbleweed had updated software snapshots released every day this month.

    The last update on news.opensuse.org included snapshot 20161108 and the 13 snapshots that have followed that have included hundreds of new packages.

  • Crowd-funding sought for first Linux tablet

    Missouri-based technology firm MJ Technology has begun a crowd-funding campaign on Indiegogo to raise US$100,000 to build the first tablets that run GNU/Linux.

    The eight developers/engineers, who make up the firm, aim to make a tablet that runs the 64-bit version of the community Linux distribution, openSUSE.

OpenSUSE Leap 42.1 vs. Leap 42.2 vs. Tumbleweed Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
SUSE

For those curious how openSUSE Leap 42.2, which was released last week, compares performance-wise to Leap 42.1 and the rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed, here are some benchmarks today for your viewing pleasure. Also included with this openSUSE performance comparison was Intel's Clear Linux distribution as an independent metric of a distribution that's generally among the fastest thanks to the aggressive optimizations by default.

Read more

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • The Unheard Of Company Behind The Failed Ubuntu Tablet Now Aims For OpenSUSE Tablet

    Back in 2014~2015 was talk of an Ubuntu Tablet inspired by the failed Ubuntu Edge smartphone campaign and the company would just send along prototype pictures and specifications along with some pricing goals. That tablet never materialized but now that same group of folks is trying a crowdfunding campaign for an openSUSE tablet.

    Coming as a surprise to us today is that MJ Technology, the basically unheard of company trying for the earlier Ubuntu Tablet, is now pushing out an openSUSE Tablet. “MJ Technology, a leader in affordable cutting edge tech, is pleased to introduce the MJ Technology Warrior series tablets powered by openSUSE,” MJ Tech's CEO told OpenSUSE.org. Affordable cutting edge tech? Their only other apparent product has been a "MJ7HDTV" Android HDTV Tuner Tablet.

  • MJ Technology Tablet has openSUSE, Dual Boot

    It’s official; the Warrior Tablet made by MJ Technology and powered by openSUSE is ready for the world; now it just needs funding through an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign.

    Avid Linux users can reap the benefits of four 10.1” Linux tablets offered by MJ Techology. The specifications of the four tablets vary in power and cost, but all come with the power of Linux and openSUSE at the core.

    “MJ Technology, a leader in affordable cutting edge tech, is pleased to introduce the MJ Technology Warrior series tablets powered by openSUSE,” said Mark Jun, CEO for MJ Technology.

  • openSUSE Mentors Blog about Google Summer of Code Experience

    Mentors for this year’s Google Summer of Code blog about their experience being a mentor, the Mentor Summit at Google and the collaborative effort start an openSUSE mentoring page, 101.opensuse.org. View the blow here or read it below.

Red Hat and SUSE

Filed under
Red Hat
SUSE
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.

A GTK+ 3 update

  • A GTK+ 3 update
    When we started development towards GTK+ 4, we laid out a plan that said GTK+ 3.22 would be the final, stable branch of GTK+ 3. And we’ve stuck to this for a while. I has served us reasonably well — GTK+ 3 stopped changing in drastic ways, which was well-received, and we are finally seeing applications moving from GTK+ 2.
  • GTK+ 3.24 To Deliver Some New Features While Waiting For GTK4
    While the GNOME tool-kit developers have been hard at work on GTK4 roughly the past two years and have kept GTK3 frozen at GTK+ 3.22, a GTK+ 3.24 release is now being worked on to deliver some new features until GTK+ 4.0 is ready to be released. While GTK+ 4.0 is shaping up well and GTK+ 3.22 was planned to be the last GTK3 stable release, the developers have had second thoughts due to GTK+ 4 taking time to mature. Some limited new features are being offered up in the GTK+ 3.24 release to debut this September.

Finally: First stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5

After almost exactly two years of being work-in-progress, the first stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5 has been published! You can grab the sources at your local KDE mirror. Some distributions like ArchLinux already ship binary packages. After one beta and one release candidate, now comes the final release. You may wonder why this release gets version number 0.8.1 but not 0.8 as expected. This is simply due to the fact that I noticed a bug in CMakeLists.txt when computing version numbers which did not work if the version number just had two fields, i. e. no ‘patch’ version. As the code and the tag of 0.8 was already pushed, I had no alternative than to fix the problem and increase the version number. Otherwise, the ChangeLog (alternative view) is virtually unchanged compared to the last pre-release. Read more

Today in Techrights