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SUSE

SUSE Formalizes Container Strategy with a New Linux Distro, MicroOS

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Linux
SUSE

Arguably, CoreOS Linux could be called the first Linux-based operating system designed for cluster computing, containers/microservices. Even if CoreOS Linux (since renamed “Container Linux“) had its roots in the traditional Linux OS, it offered a new approach towards operating systems: One of the most significant features of Container Linux is transitional upgrades that keep the system up-to-date without user intervention.

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Containers Rising

Filed under
Server
SUSE
  • SUSE Formalizes Container Strategy with a New Linux Distro, MicroOS

    Arguably, CoreOS Linux could be called the first Linux-based operating system designed for cluster computing, containers/microservices. Even if CoreOS Linux (since renamed “Container Linux“) had its roots in the traditional Linux OS, it offered a new approach towards operating systems: One of the most significant features of Container Linux is transitional upgrades that keep the system up-to-date without user intervention.

  • Container Revenue Growing to $2.7B by 2020

    The market for application containers, largely led by the open-source Docker container engine, has been a hot area in recent years, at least in terms of mindshare - but how much money is there in the container market? A new forecast from 451 Research aims to answer that question.

    According to 451 Research, the market for application container technologies in 2016 generated $762 million in revenue. Looking forward to 2020, 451 Research is forecasting that 2020 revenue will reach $2.7 billion for a 40 percent compound annual growth rate.

    The upward revenue growth trajectory for application containers is not a surprise given some of the current adoption trends. 451 Research conducted a study in April and May 2016 that found 14 percent of surveyed organizations were using Docker containers in production. Additionally nearly 31 percent of surveyed organizations indicated they were piloting or evaluating Docker containers.

Mesa, Kernel, Wireshark update in Tumbleweed Snapshots

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SUSE

There were plenty of Tumbleweed snapshots leading up to the holiday season and openSUSE’s rolling release is gliding into 2017 with several new packages on the horizon.

The last snapshot of 2016, 20161226, updated the Linux Kernel to 4.9, which was a good way to end the year. Several packages were updated in the snapshot including Python3-setuptools to version 31.0.0, gnome-online-accounts 3.22.3, NetworkManager 1.4.4 and yast2-network 3.2.17.

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SUSE and Red Hat

Filed under
Red Hat
SUSE

Raspberry Pi: Hands on with SuSE and openSuSE Linux

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Reviews
SUSE

At the end of November, the Raspberry Pi Blog announced the availability of SuSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for the Raspberry Pi 3. As Eben Upton said at that time, this was a big deal for two reasons -- it was the first official 64-bit operating system for the Pi 3 (Raspbian and other currently available versions are 32-bit), and it was an official release from a major vendor.

The announcement in theSuSE Blog gives a lot more information about the what/why/how of the SLES port, and makes for an interesting read. From what I gather, SuSE and/or ARM gave out some spiffy packages (shown at right) which contained a Raspberry Pi 3 preloaded with SLES 12 SP2: I would have loved to have been there and been blessed with one...

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Will SUSE Bring SBCs to Datacenters?

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SUSE

Is the Raspberry Pi destined to be coming to your datacenter? If not the Pi, then something like it -- maybe Arduino or a single board computer we haven't seen yet, perhaps developed by one of the OEMs? Unless I miss my guess, a Pi-like device is soon going to make up the guts in a new breed of server.

Back in November, SUSE announced that it has ported SLES, its flagship Linux operating system, to run on the Raspberry Pi 3, and has released it under the somewhat predictable name SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Raspberry Pi. According to the announcement, as well as an accompanying blog post by jayk, this is no big deal. It was done mainly just for the fun of it, with its only practical application being "that it would be really a cool way for our field team to demonstrate SLES at trade shows."

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GeckoLinux "Rolling" and "Static" editions updated

Filed under
Linux
News
SUSE

The Rolling spins of GeckoLinux have been updated to a newer openSUSE Tumbleweed base system, together with some configuration improvements. Additionally, the GeckoLinux Static spins have also been updated with similar improvements.

GeckoLinux offers live installable Rolling spins based on openSUSE Tumbleweed, and live installable Static spins based on openSUSE Leap 42.2. GeckoLinux currently offers customized spins for the Cinnamon, XFCE, Gnome, Plasma, Mate, and LXQt desktop environments.

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GeckoLinux Rolling Editions Now Based on the Latest openSUSE Tumbleweed Snapshot

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Linux
SUSE

After announcing last week the release of the GeckoLinux Static 422.161213 Editions based on openSUSE Leap 42.2, the developers of the openSUSE-based distribution launched today new respins of the GeckoLinux Rolling Editions.

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SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 for Raspberry Pi: An intriguing option for data centers

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SUSE

SUSE announced recently that it managed to take its enterprise-grade platform, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES), and marry it with the Raspberry Pi. Fancy that—a platform created to support massive workloads and mission-critical services running on a $35 computer.

You can download a 60-day evaluation of SUSE Enterprise Server 12 SP2 for Pi (login required). Be sure to check out the quick start guide. If you have trouble with subscription codes for SUSE Enterprise Server 12 SP2 for Pi, check out this forum thread.

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GeckoLinux "Rolling" editions updated to newer openSUSE Tumbleweed base, new Calamares installer

Filed under
Linux
News
SUSE

The "Rolling" spins of GeckoLinux, based on openSUSE Tumbleweed, have been updated to a newer Tumbleweed base system. Additionally, the old yast2-live-installer has been replaced in favor of the Calamares installer.

GeckoLinux offers live installable "Rolling" spins based on openSUSE Tumbleweed, and live installable "Static" spins based on openSUSE Leap 42.2. It currently offers customized spins for the Cinnamon, XFCE, Gnome, Plasma, Mate, and LXQt desktop environments.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux and Graphics

  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Now Available for Linux Lite Users, Here's How to Install It
    Minutes after the release of Linux kernel 4.10 last evening, Jerry Bezencon from the Linux Lite project announced that users of the Ubuntu-based distribution can now install it on their machines. Linux 4.10 is now the most advanced kernel branch for all Linux-based operating systems, and brings many exciting new features like virtual GPU support, better writeback management, eBPF hooks for cgroups, as well as Intel Cache Allocation Technology support for the L2/L3 caches of Intel processors.
  • Wacom's Intuos Pro To Be Supported By The Linux 4.11 Kernel
    Jiri Kosina submitted the HID updates today for the Linux 4.11 kernel cycle.
  • Mesa 13.0.5 Released for Linux Gamers with over 70 Improvements, Bug Fixes
    We reported the other day that Mesa 13.0.5 3D Graphics Library will be released this week, and it looks like Collabora's Emil Velikov announced it earlier this morning for all Linux gamers. Mesa 13.0.5 is a maintenance update to the Mesa 13.0 stable series of the open source graphics stack used by default in numerous, if not all GNU/Linux distributions, providing gamers with powerful drivers for their AMD Radeon, Nvidia, and Intel GPUs. It comes approximately three weeks after the Mesa 13.0.4 update.
  • mesa 13.0.5

Interview: Thomas Weissel Installing Plasma in Austrian Schools

With Plasma 5 having reached maturity for widespread use we are starting to see rollouts of it in large environments. Dot News interviewed the admin behind one such rollout in Austrian schools. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Top Lightweight Linux Distributions To Try In 2017
    Today I am going to discuss the top lightweight Linux distros you can try this year on your computer. Although you got yourself a prettyLinuxle linux already but there is always something new to try in Linux. Remember I recommend to try this distros in virtualbox firstly or with the live boot before messing with your system. All distro that I will mention here will be new and somewhat differ from regular distros.
  • [ANNOUNCE] linux-4.10-ck1 / MuQSS CPU scheduler 0.152
  • MSAA Compression Support For Intel's ANV Vulkan Driver
    Intel developer Jason Ekstrand posted a patch over the weekend for enabling MSAA compression support within the ANV Vulkan driver.
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 31
    As we announced in the previous report, our 31th Scrum sprint was slightly shorter than the usual ones. But you would never say so looking to this blog post. We have a lot of things to talk you about!
  • Comparing Mobile Subscriber Data Across Different Sources - How accurate is the TomiAhonen Almanac every year?
    You’ll see that last spring I felt the world had 7.6 Billion total mobile subscriptions when machine-to-machine (M2M) connections are included. I felt the world had 7.2 Billion total subscriptions when excluding M2M and just counting those in use by humans. And the most relevant number (bottom line) is the ‘unique’ mobile users, which I felt was an even 5.0 Billion humans in 2015. The chart also has the total handsets-in-use statistic which I felt was 5.6 Billion at the end of 2015. Note that I was literally the first person to report on the distinction of the unique user count vs total subscriptions and I have been urging, nearly begging for the big industry giants to also measure that number. They are slowly joining in that count. Similarly to M2M, we also are now starting to see others report M2M counts. I have yet to see a major mobile statistical provider give a global count of devices in use. That will hopefully come also, soon. But lets examine these three numbers that we now do have other sources, a year later, to see did I know what I was doing.

Leftovers: Gaming