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SUSE

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Open Build Service version 2.7 released

    We are happy to announce the availability of the Open Build Service Version 2.7! Three large features around the topic of integrating external resources made it into this release. We worked on automatic tracking of moving repositories of development versions like Fedora Rawhide, distribution updates or rolling Linux releases like Arch. A change to the OBS git integration to enable developers to work on continuous builds. And last but not least an experimental KIWI import that can be used to easily migrate your images from SUSE studio.

  • ​SUSE Enterprise Storage 3 released for serious storage work

    When Red Hat bought Ceph's parent company Inktank, people were worried Red Hat would keep Ceph's object store and file system to itself. Then, Red Hat announced it would let others help decide on Ceph's future. Now, SUSE, a rival Linux power, is taking Red Hat up on this with its Ceph-supporting release of SUSE Enterprise Storage 3.

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/22
  • openSUSE.Asia 2016 announced from Indonesia

    We are happy to announce the third openSUSE.Asia Summit. The openSUSE.Asia Summit 2016 will take place at Sunan Kalijaga State Islamic University in Yogyakarta, Indonesia on October 1st and 2nd, 2016.

    The summit is a great way for both openSUSE contributors, and, users to meet each other and have fun. The openSUSE community will get together, share their experiences, and, learn free and open source technologies.

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Google Summer of Code Student Implementing Payment Feature

    Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Rishabh Saxena. Rishabh is assisting with openSUSE’s Open Source Event Management during the Google Summer of Code.

  • Debugger in YaST

    Until now debugging the YaST installation was usually done by checking the y2log. If you needed more details you would add more log calls.

    This is inconvenient and takes too much time. For better debugging a real debugger would be nice…

  • May “installs” — Tumbleweed and 42.2 Alpha1

    It’s early June, and I still have not reported a couple of “installs” that I did in May. So better late than never.

    I used scare quotes around “install” because I did not actually install Tumbleweed in May, though I did do some install tests. There’s not a lot to report, so this will be a short post.

OpenSUSE Tumbleweed 's Latest

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Getting Linux Kernel 4.6 Soon, GCC 6 Migration in Progress

    Today, June 1, 2016, openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio informed the openSUSE community about the latest GNU/Linux technologies that are coming to the rolling openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system, as well as what has landed last week.

    First of all, users are being informed that the first Alpha release of the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system is now available for download and testing. However, the development cycle for openSUSE Leap 42.2 has just started, and it looks like the final release lands in the first week of November 2016.

  • openSUSE News: New Kernel, KDE Applications to arrive in Tumbleweed

    openSUSE Leap 42.2 Alpha 1, which is now available for testing, made some news last week, but this week’s news focuses more on openSUSE’s rolling distribution.

    Developers have been focusing on moving Tumbleweed to GNU Compiler Collection 6, which is always challenging for a distribution.

    In the openSUSE Tumbleweed’s Review of the Weeks 2016/21 email sent out last week by Dominique Leuenberger, he listed the progression of moving GCC 6 to the default compiler, which can be viewed on the wiki.

GeckoLinux version 421.160527.0 based on openSUSE Leap with significant updates

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SUSE

GeckoLinux is a Linux spin based on the openSUSE Leap distribution, with a focus on polish and out-of-the-box usability on the desktop. Its recent 421.160527.0 update is offered in eight (8) editions: Cinnamon, XFCE, Gnome, Plasma, Mate, Budgie, LXQt, and "BareBones", with significant improvements.

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OpenSUSE 42.2 Alpha

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SUSE

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Enters Development, First Alpha Build Brings New Goodies

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SUSE

openSUSE developer Ludwig Nussel has proudly announced today, May 24, 2016, that a first Alpha build of the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.2 computer operating system is now ready for public testing.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Needs Your Help to Make GCC 6 the Default Compiler

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SUSE

We reported at the beginning of the month that the openSUSE Tumbleweed developers are preparing a massive package rebuild to make the GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 6 the default compiler for the rolling operating system.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Developers Conference 2016, day 3 with openSUSE bug hunting

    I had my «openSUSE bug hunting» presentation scheduled at 09h30 this morning. I’m usually very lazy on Sundays but the enthusiasm of the Developers Conference is just an amazing feeling. Though we live on a small island, we get to meet some people maybe just once a year during this fun event. I picked up Shelly on the way and we reached Voilà Hotel at 09h05. Right at the hotel entrance Yash was waiting, he might have seen us coming. We went upstairs chatting and met JoKi. My presentation was scheduled at the Accelerator and I thought I’d just go and test the gear. Aargh! The TV had only HDMI cable and my ThinkPad had VGA & a Mini DisplayPort. That said, I needed an adapter. Joffrey who came around greeting everyone had a HDMI to VGA cable, which he lent me. At that same time JoKi also came with a Mini DisplayPort to HDMI convertor. Great! Then I had an adapter plus a backup.

  • YodaQA’s abilities are enlarged by traffic domain

    Everybody driving a car needs the navigation to get to the destination fast and avoid traffic jam. One of the biggest problems is how to enter fast the destination and how to find where are the congestions, what is the traffic situation. YodaQA Traffic is a project attempting to answer the traffic related questions quickly and efficiently. Drivers may ask questions in natural language like: “What is the traffic situation in the Evropská street?” or “What is the fastest route from Opletalova street to Kafkova street?” You can try out the prototype (demo available only for limited time) – try to ask for example “traffic situation in the Wilsonova street” .

  • openSUSE helps jump-start new summit

    Last week, members of The GNOME Project announced a new conference in the United States northwest to enhance the GNU/Linux application ecosystem.

    The Libre Application Summit, which will take place in Portland, Oregon, from Sept. 19 – 23, aims to empower application developers both big and small as well as enhance app developers collaboratation with major Linux distributions.

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
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Server Administration

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Kernel Space/Linux