Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SUSE

SUSE and Microsoft E.E.E.

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2017/02

    I hope you all ended up well fed and healthy in the new year. For the last few weeks we have seen quite a slow pace for Tumbleweed, just as pre-announced in my last review of the year 2016. We can surely expect an increased pace again as people from all around the world resume their regular life rhythms. For completeness sake I will cover in this weeks’ review not only this week, but also the few snapshots since my last review. That means, we cover 8 snapshots: from 2016: 1216, 1217, 1219, 1222 and 1226 and from 2017: 0104, 0109 and 0110. Sadly, 0111 and 0112 ran into some issues on openQA – but the issues are to most parts in the testing framework, not the product (from what we know). But not being able to fully confirm it, I did not feel comfortable releasing them into the wild onto you. After all, I know some of you are still having issues with the kernel 4.9 series (but good new on that part is on the horizon). 0112 might still cut it, if we solve the openQA issues in time.

  • Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10

    If you have been following Techworm, you will know that you can run Ubuntu Apps on Windows using Bash. Microsoft brought the fun and power of Linux to Windows 10 with Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). This allowed the Windows 10 users to run Bash on Ubuntu on Windows 10 and enjoy Ubuntu Apps without having to install the Ubuntu distro separately.

  • You can now install SUSE Linux distribution inside WSL on Windows 10
  • It's Now Possible to Use openSUSE Inside Windows 10, Here's How to Install It
  • Microsoft celebrates ChakraCore's first anniversary with an update on the road to parity on Linux [Ed: Another example of Microsoft hijacking projects' (e.g. GNU/Linux projects') names]

Microsoft Windows Runs Under Windows

Filed under
SUSE
  • openSUSE Linux Arrives On Windows 10

    Sr. Product Manager SUSE Linux Enterprise SUSE, Hannes Kühnemund, has written a blog post and described how to run openSUSE Leap 42.2 and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 SP2 on Windows 10. Now, by running simple commands, the users can install SUSE Linux distributions in Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). The company has also prepared a detailed blog post and described the whole procedure. For those who don’t know, by default, Microsoft enabled Ubuntu within WSL.

  • OpenSUSE comes to Windows 10. Plus, can you trust WhatsApp?

    This is the first in a weekey series I'm calling ‘weekly roundup’ in which I will highlight some of the hottest stories of the week from the world of Linux and open source. This week, I want to call your attention to some excciting Windows 10/openSUSE news and alert you to a backdoor vulnerability in WhatsApp that allows messages to be intercepted.

SUSE Formalizes Container Strategy with a New Linux Distro, MicroOS

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

Arguably, CoreOS Linux could be called the first Linux-based operating system designed for cluster computing, containers/microservices. Even if CoreOS Linux (since renamed “Container Linux“) had its roots in the traditional Linux OS, it offered a new approach towards operating systems: One of the most significant features of Container Linux is transitional upgrades that keep the system up-to-date without user intervention.

Read more

Containers Rising

Filed under
Server
SUSE
  • SUSE Formalizes Container Strategy with a New Linux Distro, MicroOS

    Arguably, CoreOS Linux could be called the first Linux-based operating system designed for cluster computing, containers/microservices. Even if CoreOS Linux (since renamed “Container Linux“) had its roots in the traditional Linux OS, it offered a new approach towards operating systems: One of the most significant features of Container Linux is transitional upgrades that keep the system up-to-date without user intervention.

  • Container Revenue Growing to $2.7B by 2020

    The market for application containers, largely led by the open-source Docker container engine, has been a hot area in recent years, at least in terms of mindshare - but how much money is there in the container market? A new forecast from 451 Research aims to answer that question.

    According to 451 Research, the market for application container technologies in 2016 generated $762 million in revenue. Looking forward to 2020, 451 Research is forecasting that 2020 revenue will reach $2.7 billion for a 40 percent compound annual growth rate.

    The upward revenue growth trajectory for application containers is not a surprise given some of the current adoption trends. 451 Research conducted a study in April and May 2016 that found 14 percent of surveyed organizations were using Docker containers in production. Additionally nearly 31 percent of surveyed organizations indicated they were piloting or evaluating Docker containers.

Mesa, Kernel, Wireshark update in Tumbleweed Snapshots

Filed under
SUSE

There were plenty of Tumbleweed snapshots leading up to the holiday season and openSUSE’s rolling release is gliding into 2017 with several new packages on the horizon.

The last snapshot of 2016, 20161226, updated the Linux Kernel to 4.9, which was a good way to end the year. Several packages were updated in the snapshot including Python3-setuptools to version 31.0.0, gnome-online-accounts 3.22.3, NetworkManager 1.4.4 and yast2-network 3.2.17.

Read more

SUSE and Red Hat

Filed under
Red Hat
SUSE

Raspberry Pi: Hands on with SuSE and openSuSE Linux

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

At the end of November, the Raspberry Pi Blog announced the availability of SuSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for the Raspberry Pi 3. As Eben Upton said at that time, this was a big deal for two reasons -- it was the first official 64-bit operating system for the Pi 3 (Raspbian and other currently available versions are 32-bit), and it was an official release from a major vendor.

The announcement in theSuSE Blog gives a lot more information about the what/why/how of the SLES port, and makes for an interesting read. From what I gather, SuSE and/or ARM gave out some spiffy packages (shown at right) which contained a Raspberry Pi 3 preloaded with SLES 12 SP2: I would have loved to have been there and been blessed with one...

Read more

Will SUSE Bring SBCs to Datacenters?

Filed under
SUSE

Is the Raspberry Pi destined to be coming to your datacenter? If not the Pi, then something like it -- maybe Arduino or a single board computer we haven't seen yet, perhaps developed by one of the OEMs? Unless I miss my guess, a Pi-like device is soon going to make up the guts in a new breed of server.

Back in November, SUSE announced that it has ported SLES, its flagship Linux operating system, to run on the Raspberry Pi 3, and has released it under the somewhat predictable name SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Raspberry Pi. According to the announcement, as well as an accompanying blog post by jayk, this is no big deal. It was done mainly just for the fun of it, with its only practical application being "that it would be really a cool way for our field team to demonstrate SLES at trade shows."

Read more

GeckoLinux "Rolling" and "Static" editions updated

Filed under
Linux
News
SUSE

The Rolling spins of GeckoLinux have been updated to a newer openSUSE Tumbleweed base system, together with some configuration improvements. Additionally, the GeckoLinux Static spins have also been updated with similar improvements.

GeckoLinux offers live installable Rolling spins based on openSUSE Tumbleweed, and live installable Static spins based on openSUSE Leap 42.2. GeckoLinux currently offers customized spins for the Cinnamon, XFCE, Gnome, Plasma, Mate, and LXQt desktop environments.

Read more

GeckoLinux Rolling Editions Now Based on the Latest openSUSE Tumbleweed Snapshot

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

After announcing last week the release of the GeckoLinux Static 422.161213 Editions based on openSUSE Leap 42.2, the developers of the openSUSE-based distribution launched today new respins of the GeckoLinux Rolling Editions.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • GNU Guile 2.2.1 released
    We are happy to announce GNU Guile release 2.2.1, the first bug-fix release in the new 2.2 stable release series.
  • Announcing Nylas Mail 2.0 [Ed: just Electron]
  • Cerebro Is An Amazing Open Source OS X Spotlight Alternative For Linux [Ed: also just Electron]
    You may be fed up with traditional way of searching/opening applications on your system. Cerebro is an amazing utility built using Electron and available for Linux, Windows, and Mac. It is open-source and released under MIT license.
  • Flowblade Another Video Editor for Linux? Give It A Try!
    You may have favorite video editor to edit your videos but there is no harm to try something new, its initial release was not that long, with time it made some great improvements. It can be bit hard to master this video editor but if you are not new in this field you can make it easily and will be total worth of time.
  • Get System Info from CLI Using `NeoFetch` Tool in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • Ukuu Kernel Manager Utility lets You Upgrade or Install Kernels in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    There are many ways to upgrade your Linux Kernel using Synaptics, command line and so. The Ukuu utility is the simply solution to manager your Ubuntu/Linux Mint kernels. If you want to test new fixes in the Linux Kernel then you can install Mainline Kernels released by Ubuntu team but mainline Kernels are intended to use for testing purposes only (so be careful).
  • 10 Reasons Why You Should Use Vi/Vim Text Editor in Linux
    While working with Linux systems, there are several areas where you’ll need to use a text editor including programming/scripting, editing configuration/text files, to mention but a few. There are several remarkable text editors you’ll find out there for Linux-based operating systems.
  • OpenShot 2.3 Linux Video Editor New Features
    It’s been quite some time since we last talked about OpenShot, and more specifically when it had its second major release. Recently, the team behind the popular open source video editor has made its third point release available which happens to come with a couple of exciting new features and tools, so here is a quick guide on where to find them and how to use them.
  • Boostnote: Another Great Note Taking App for Developers? Find Out By Yourself
    Boostnote is an open-source note-taking application especially made for programmers and developers, it is build up with Electron framework and cross-platform available for Linux, Windows and Mac. Being programmers, we take lots of notes which includes commands, code snippets, bug information and so on. It all comes in handy when you have organized them all in one place, Boostnote does this job very well. It lets you organize your notes in folders with tags, so you can find anything you are looking for very quickly.
  • Collabora Office 5.3 Released
    Today we released Collabora Office 5.3 and Collabora GovOffice 5.3, which contain great new features and enhancements. They also contains all fixes from the upstream libreoffice-5-3 branch and several backported features.

Virtualization and Containers

GNOME News

today's howtos