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SUSE

SUSE and openSUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • SUSE serves up Linux kernel patching, live & hot

    If there’s one thing that Linux needs to aid its march onwards it is (arguably) more enterprise robustness.

    Actually, if there’s one thing that Linux needs for enterprise success it’s firms like Microsoft stating that it loves Linux, but we’ve already experienced that epiphany, so what else can we hope for?

  • Tumbleweed Snapshots Get YaST Changes for Firewalld

    There is no signs of slowing down openSUSE’s rolling release  Tumbleweed as six snapshots of new software were released this past week.

    Not all the snapshots were large; in fact, one offered just a handful of new packages, but the releases keep coming.

SUSE releases live patching for big iron, real-time OS update

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Security
SUSE

Germany-based Linux vendor SUSE Linux has launched live patching for its enterprise Linux distribution that runs on IBM Power Systems and also a service pack for its real-tine enterprise distribution that will enable systems running it to handle both real-time and non-real-time workloads on a single virtual machine.

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openSUSE's New Beta and Ruby on openSUSE

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Leap 15 Operating System Enters Beta, Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15
  • OpenSUSE Leap 15 Beta Snapshots Begin, Powered By Linux 4.14 + Plasma 5.12

    The first public beta snapshots have begun for openSUSE Leap 15, the distribution that will be mirroring SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15 that is under development for release this summer.

  • Ruby on openSUSE

    Ruby is a wonderful programming language. Every year in December as a kind of Christmas present there is a new release. It's great to be on a language which is kept up to date but it comes with the challenge to manage multiple Ruby versions. There are a couple of solutions around such as RVM, rbenv, or chruby but they all have their drawbacks.

    What would a Linux distribution do? At openSUSE, we package all the versions in the Build Service. We also package many gems but this is an effort which is sort of futile given the huge and growing number of gems and their versions. But you do reliably get the Ruby interpreter and gem tool as openSUSE package. To not create conflicts all the executables are suffixed with the Ruby version. That allows for parallel installation of multiple Ruby versions. It also works for all the executables installed through gems. The drawback is that you don't get the executable names you would expect because of the additional suffix.

openSUSE Leap 15 Reaches Beta Phase Snapshots

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SUSE

Exactly like the rolling development model used to make openSUSE Leap 42.3, Leap 15.0 will use the same model until its final build. No concrete milestones will be used building up to the final release, which is expected in late Spring. As bugs are fixed and new packages introduced or excluded, snapshots of the latest beta phase builds will be released once they pass openQA testing; the first beta version build (Build 109.3) of openSUSE Leap 15 was recently released and there are currently two follow-on beta builds that would feature minor improvements if the beta builds pass openQA .

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Also: KDE Plasma 5.12, Btrfs Improvement, Linux Support for Wacom SmartPad Devices and More

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Can Now Try Out the KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS Desktop

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KDE
SUSE

Eight new snapshots have been released for OpenSuSE Tumbleweed since our last report, bringing users the beta version for the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS desktop environment, which is coming in early February, along with the first point release of the KDE Applications 17.12 software suite and KDE Frameworks 5.42.0.

"The largest snapshot of the week was no doubt snapshot 20180122. The snapshot provided KDE Applications 17.12.1, Frameworks 5.42.0 and the beta version for KDE’s next Long-Term-Support (LTS) release of Plasma 5.12. Tumbleweed users can try out the new items in the 5.12 LTS like the new KDE Store, which brings a wide selection of addons," Douglas DeMaio wrote in a weekly report.

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openSUSE Education Project Is Going Bye-Bye After Release of openSUSE Leap 15.0

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SUSE

A public announcement was made last week by OpenSuSE Project's Lars Vogdt to inform the community about the future of the openSUSE Education project, which tried to support schools in the past several years using the latest openSUSE Leap and SUSE Linux Enterprise technologies.

The latest release of the openSUSE-Edu Li-f-e (Linux for Education) operating system was based on openSUSE Leap 42.1, and the team appears to still spend a lot of time maintaining more than 460 packages in the openSUSE Education project, but did not manage to find new contributors to maintain its repositories or create a new release.

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openSUSE and openSUSE-Education

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SUSE
  • OpenSUSE Rolling Out Retpoline Support, Xen Spectre/Meltdown Mitigation

    SUSE's Richard Brown has issued a status update around openSUSE's ongoing mitigation of the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities.

    The big piece of news is openSUSE is rolling out Spectre V2 mitigation soon using Retpoliens rather than their current microcode approach where they ended up pulling that anyhow in light of the Intel CPU microcode troubles recently reported of reboots, etc.

  • The future of openSUSE-Education

    The openSUSE-Education project tries to support schools using openSUSE. We create and describe additional software-repositories for educational projects and we created Add-on medias and finally a live DVD from the regular openSUSE distribution.

    As you can see in our timeline, we achieved quite a lot in the past years, had fun and meet a couple of very nice people out there in our spare time. But the main team members moved on to new projects, with the hope that we would one day find some time to work more on openSUSE-Education again. This does not seem to happen – at least not for the foreseeable future.

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Linux Operating System Reached End of Life, Upgrade Now

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SUSE

The openSUSE Leap 42.2 Linux-based operating system has reached end of life on January 26, 2018, and it is no longer supported by the openSUSE Project with software and security updates.

A minor release of openSUSE Leap 42 operating system series, openSUSE Leap 42.2 was released on November 16, 2016, and was based on the SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2 operating system. The release was powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel and KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop environment, besides numerous other new GNU/Linux and Open Source technologies.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Server
SUSE
  • Mirantis CEO Adrian Ionel Comes Back, Champions Open Source for Multi-Cloud

    Mirantis brought back its original CEO and Co-founder Adrian Ionel (pictured), to move the company beyond private cloud and help its customers adopt multi-cloud strategies. Alex Freeland, who is also a co-founder, will step down as CEO but remain a board member.

    Ionel served as CEO from the company’s launch in 2011 until 2015, when he left to start up Dorsal, an open source software support firm. During his initial tenure at Mirantis he led the company’s investment in OpenStack, growing its customer base to more than 200 enterprises.

  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 49

    Time goes by and the YaST wheel keeps rolling. So let’s take a look to what have moved since our previous development report.

  • Storage-NG Now Active In openSUSE Tumbleweed

    SUSE's libstorage-ng back-end for YaST's new low-level storage library is now active within the rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed distribution.

    Libstorage has traditionally been responsible for SUSE/openSUSE's disk/partition/LVM management and other storage device management. After more than two years of work, libstorage-ng has replaced libstorage within Tumbleweed.

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Linux Distribution Reaches End of Life on January 26, 2018

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SUSE

Announced two years ago on November 16, OpenSuSE Leap 42.2 is a minor release of openSUSE Leap 42 operating system series, which brought the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel and KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop environment, as well as many other improvements and up-to-date components. openSUSE Leap 42.2 was based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2, but it will reach end of life this week on January 26.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Desktop: Flatpak and Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension

  • Flatpak in detail, part 2
    The first post in this series looked at runtimes and extensions. Here, we’ll look at how flatpak keeps the applications and runtimes on your system organized, with installations, repositories, branches, commits and deployments.
  • Flatpak – a history
    I’ve been working on Flatpak for almost 4 years now, and 1.0 is getting closer. I think it might be interesting at this point to take a retrospective look at the history of Flatpak.
  • Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension Changes Your Desktop Background With Images From Various Online Sources
    Random Wallpaper is an extension for Gnome Shell that can automatically fetch wallpapers from a multitude of online sources and set it as your desktop background. The automatic wallpaper changer comes with built-in support for downloading wallpapers from unsplash.com, desktopper.co, wallhaven.cc, as well as support for basic JSON APIs or files. The JSON support is in fact my favorite feature in Random Wallpaper. That's because thanks to it and the examples available on the Random Wallpaper GitHub Wiki, one can easily add Chromecast Images, NASA Picture of the day, Bing Picture of the day, and Google Earth View (Google Earth photos from a selection of around 1500 curated locations) as image sources.

today's howtos

KDE: QtPad, Celebrating 10 Years with KDE, GSoC 2018

  • QtPad - Modern Customizable Sticky Note App for Linux
    In this article, we'll focus on how to install and use QtPad on Ubuntu 18.04. Qtpad is a unique and highly customizable sticky note application written in Qt5 and Python3 tailored for Unix systems.
  • Celebrating 10 Years with KDE
    Of course I am using KDE software much longer. My first Linux distribution, SuSE 6.2 (the precursor to openSUSE), came with KDE 1.1.1 and was already released 19 years ago. But this post is not celebrating the years I am using KDE software. Exactly ten years ago, dear Albert committed my first contribution to KDE. A simple patch for a problem that looked obvious to fix, but waiting for someone to actually do the work. Not really understanding the consequences, it marks the start of my journey within the amazing KDE community.
  • GSoC 2018 – Coding Period (May 28th to June 18th): First Evaluation and Progress with LVM VG
    I got some problems during the last weeks of Google Summer of Code which made me deal with some challenges. One of these challenges was caused by a HD physical problem. I haven’t made a backup of some work and had to rework again in some parts of my code. As I already knew how to proceed, it was faster than the first time. I had to understand how the device loading process is made in Calamares to load a preview of the new LVM VG during its creation in Partition Page. I need to list it as a new storage device in this page and deal with the revert process. I’ve implemented some basic fixes and tried to improve it.

Open Hardware: Good for Your Brand, Good for Your Bottom Line

Chip makers are starting to catch on to the advantages of open, however. SiFive has released an entirely open RISC-V development board. Its campaign on the Crowd Supply crowd-funding website very quickly raised more than $140,000 USD. The board itself is hailed as a game-changer in the world of hardware. Developments like these will ensure that it won't be long before the hardware equivalent of LEGO's bricks will soon be as open as the designs built using them. Read more