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SUSE

Mesa updates in Tumbleweed, OpenSSL security issue fixed

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SUSE

Tumbleweed had two snapshot this week and Mesa updated two new minor versions since Saturday’s 20151209 snapshot.

The biggest package update for the week was to autofs in the 20151214 snapshot. Autofs, which is a program for automatically mounting directories, had several fixes and upstream patches.

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OpenSUSE Leap 42.1 - Leap? More of a plunge.

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Reviews
SUSE

On paper, openSUSE Leap 42.1, with SLE stability and three years of support, kernel 4.1 and Plasma 5.4, tons of good software, and community repos sounds like a blazing good deal, a dream come true, the Linux Nirvana. In reality, it is nothing of the sort.

Package management works, but you don't get all the software you need plus conflicts, codecs are broken, network connectivity is half-broken, smartphone support is average, resource utilization is high. The distro works, but it gives you no love. It is far from being the beautiful, exciting, amazing product that I expected, the kind that reigned supreme in the SUSE 10 and 11 days. Ah, how I miss them.

Overall, despite being stable, i.e. non-crashy, openSUSE 42.1 is hardly usable as a day-to-day distro. If you value your software, media and gadgets, then this operating system will frustrate you. Xubuntu Vivid or Mint Rafaela are much better choices. Faster, leaner, just as beautiful, and they actually give you everything you need, without any bugs or problems. This autumn season turns out to be one of the worst I've ever had, and it makes me wanna blowtorch a few keyboards. Almost anything and everything I tested so far sucks to a high or very high degree. Present company included. OpenSUSE 42.1, one small step for SUSE, one giant leap for failure. 4/10.

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Also reviewed in:

  • openSUSE Leap 42.1 DVD, 32-bit Linux distributions and the Toshiba NB520

    OpenSUSE has been my go-to distribution for my dated Toshiba NB520. My sturdy 3 year old Toshiba netbook doesn't support Gnome 3 or Ubuntu Unity due to hardware limitations, but the last three releases of openSUSE KDE handled every piece of hardware on the NB520 without issues. OpenSUSE Leap 42.1's DVD has only an x86-64 release as of this writing, though 32-bit users can always install Tumbleweed, openSUSE's well-reviewed rolling release. Tumbleweed has installation media for 32-bit machines and if you're still running a previous 32-bit release of openSUSE, you can always run the upgrade procedure to Tumbleweed.

  • Notes on installing openSUSE Leap 42.1

    If you selected the options to Add Online Repositories Before Installation and Include Add-on Products from Separate Media during the installation process using the openSUSE Leap 42.1 DVD, the setup process might stall midway.

American Megatrends (AMI) Joins SUSE Linux’s 64-bit ARM Partner Program

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SUSE

American Megatrends Inc. (AMI), a hardware and software company that specializes in BIOS and UEFI firmware, PC hardware, data storage products, remote and server management tools, as well as unique solutions powered by Linux and Android, was proud to announce that it has joined SUSE's 64-bit ARM Partner Program.

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OpenSUSE LEAP: A Great Free Linux Server Distribution

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Reviews
SUSE

So what exactly is LEAP? What’s it for? The easiest way to approach something like OpenSUSE LEAP is to think of it like a beefed-up, more stable Fedora-type thing. The main goal of this Linux distribution is to create an enterprise grade distribution designed for workstations and servers free of charge.

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Also: I accidentally openSUSE

openSUSE Developers Discuss the Removal of Custom Artwork for KDE Plasma 5

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SUSE

openSUSE developer Luca Beltrame started a new discussion on the openSUSE mailing list where he explains some facts regarding the future of custom themes for the KDE Plasma desktop environment used in the openSUSE Linux distribution.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets Wine 1.8 RC2, VirtualBox 5.0.10, and GDM 3.18.2

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SUSE

Dominique Leuenberger informs users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling-release operating system about the release of two news snapshots, which include several updated applications and a few other under-the-hood improvements.

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Tumbleweed changes fonts, Leap gets several updates

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SUSE

Tumbleweed had one snapshot so far this week that brought more appeal to users of openSUSE.

Snapshot 20151123 changed fonts for openSUSE. The terminal font changed to Adobe Code Pro and Roboto was also added as the default font.

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What happened with Suse Linux Enterprise Server?

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OS
Linux
SUSE

It had been years since I installed Suse Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for development and testing purposes. I recently loaded SLES 12 to port RapidDisk as a precompiled RPM for the distribution and what a disaster that was. What happened to this distribution? Read more here.

openSUSE Leap 42.1 + Cinnamon, XFCE, or Budgie = GeckoLinux

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Linux
News
SUSE

GeckoLinux is based on openSUSE Leap 42.1, and it exists to make the openSUSE distribution more refined and approachable. It has recently released live installable DVD editions featuring the Cinnamon, XFCE, and Budgie desktop environments. These include many refinements and features not available in the standard openSUSE Leap installation images.

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openSUSE Leap bring SUSE Linux Enterprise out in the open

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SUSE

SUSE has been doing things very, very right for a very long time. It never ceases to amaze me that this brilliant company hasn't found more traction in the US. Hopefully openSUSE LEAP will be that which will help them leap in the spotlight here in the States.

Do you SUSE? Will you LEAP?

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Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • OpenSSL patches two high-severity flaws
    OpenSSL has released versions 1.0.2h and 1.0.1t of its open source cryptographic library, fixing multiple security vulnerabilities that can lead to traffic being decrypted, denial-of-service attacks, and arbitrary code execution. One of the high-severity vulnerabilities is actually a hybrid of two low-risk bugs and can cause OpenSSL to crash.
  • Linux Foundation Advances Security Efforts via Badging Program
    The Linux Foundation Core Infrastructure Initiative's badging program matures, as the first projects to achieve security badges are announced.
  • Linux Foundation tackles open source security with new badge program
  • WordPress Plugin ‘Ninja Forms’ Security Vulnerability
    FOSS Force has just learned from Wordfence, a security company that focuses on the open source WordPress content management platform, that a popular plugin used by over 500,000 sites, Ninja Forms, contains serious security vulnerabilities.
  • Preparing Your Network for the IoT Revolution
    While there is no denying that IP-based connectivity continues to become more and more pervasive, this is not a fundamentally new thing. What is new is the target audience is changing and connectivity is becoming much more personal. It’s no longer limited to high end technology consumers (watches and drones) but rather, it is showing up in nearly everything from children’s toys to kitchen appliances (yes again) and media devices. The purchasers of these new technology-enabled products are far from security experts, or even security aware. Their primary purchasing requirements are ease of use.
  • regarding embargoes
    Yesterday I jumped the gun committing some patches to LibreSSL. We receive advance copies of the advisory and patches so that when the new OpenSSL ships, we’re ready to ship as well. Between the time we receive advance notice and the public release, we’re supposed to keep this information confidential. This is the embargo. During the embargo time we get patches lined up and a source tree for each cvs branch in a precommit state. Then we wait with our fingers on the trigger. What happened yesterday was I woke up to a couple OpenBSD developers talking about the EBCDIC CVE. Oh, it’s public already? Check the OpenSSL git repo and sure enough, there are a bunch of commits for embargoed issues. Pull the trigger! Pull the trigger! Launch the missiles! Alas, we didn’t look closely enough at the exact issues fixed and had missed the fact that only low severity issues had been made public. The high severity issues were still secret. We were too hasty.
  • Medical Equipment Crashes During Heart Procedure Because of Antivirus Scan [Ed: Windows]
    A critical medical equipment crashed during a heart procedure due to a timely scan triggered by the antivirus software installed on the PC to which the said device was sending data for logging and monitoring.
  • Hotel sector faces cybercrime surge as data breaches start to bite
    Since 2014, things have become a lot more serious with a cross section of mostly US hotels suffering major breaches during Point-of-Sale (POS) terminals. Panda Security lists a string of attacks on big brands including on Trump Hotels, Hilton Worldwide, Hyatt, Starwood, Rosen Hotels & Resorts as well two separate attacks on hotel management outfit White Lodging and another on non-US hotel Mandarin Oriental.