Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SUSE

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • Developers Conference 2016, day 3 with openSUSE bug hunting

    I had my «openSUSE bug hunting» presentation scheduled at 09h30 this morning. I’m usually very lazy on Sundays but the enthusiasm of the Developers Conference is just an amazing feeling. Though we live on a small island, we get to meet some people maybe just once a year during this fun event. I picked up Shelly on the way and we reached Voilà Hotel at 09h05. Right at the hotel entrance Yash was waiting, he might have seen us coming. We went upstairs chatting and met JoKi. My presentation was scheduled at the Accelerator and I thought I’d just go and test the gear. Aargh! The TV had only HDMI cable and my ThinkPad had VGA & a Mini DisplayPort. That said, I needed an adapter. Joffrey who came around greeting everyone had a HDMI to VGA cable, which he lent me. At that same time JoKi also came with a Mini DisplayPort to HDMI convertor. Great! Then I had an adapter plus a backup.

  • YodaQA’s abilities are enlarged by traffic domain

    Everybody driving a car needs the navigation to get to the destination fast and avoid traffic jam. One of the biggest problems is how to enter fast the destination and how to find where are the congestions, what is the traffic situation. YodaQA Traffic is a project attempting to answer the traffic related questions quickly and efficiently. Drivers may ask questions in natural language like: “What is the traffic situation in the Evropská street?” or “What is the fastest route from Opletalova street to Kafkova street?” You can try out the prototype (demo available only for limited time) – try to ask for example “traffic situation in the Wilsonova street” .

  • openSUSE helps jump-start new summit

    Last week, members of The GNOME Project announced a new conference in the United States northwest to enhance the GNU/Linux application ecosystem.

    The Libre Application Summit, which will take place in Portland, Oregon, from Sept. 19 – 23, aims to empower application developers both big and small as well as enhance app developers collaboratation with major Linux distributions.

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Getting Qt 5.6, Linux Kernel 4.6, and KDE Plasma 5.6.4 Soon

Filed under
SUSE

Today, May 18, openSUSE developer Douglas DeMaio has informed the community about the new features that are about to land in the software repositories of openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling GNU/Linux operating system.

Read more

SUSE Linux Enterprise Live Patching Promises 100% Uptime for Businesses

Filed under
SUSE

Today, May 17, 2016, SUSE, a pioneer in open source software and the maker of the SUSE Linux operating system, has had the great pleasure of announcing the availability of SUSE Linux Enterprise Live Patching.

Read more

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get KDE Plasma 5.6.3, Firefox 46 & Linux Kernel 4.5.3

Filed under
SUSE

openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio today, May 11, 2016, informed the openSUSE Tumbleweed community about the latest GNU/Linux technologies that landed in the rolling release operating system.

Read more

openSUSE Tumbleweed Prepares for GCC 6, Users Get Linux Kernel 4.5.2, Mesa 11.2

Filed under
SUSE

The openSUSE Project today, May 4, 2016, published details about the latest major open-source components that landed in the main software repositories of the openSUSE Tumbleweed distro recently.

Read more

5 things that set openSUSE, elementary OS and Ubuntu apart

Filed under
SUSE
Ubuntu

I am a huge fan of openSUSE and Arch Linux; those are the two distributions that I run on my main system. But I don't belong to any fan-base; I also run some of the major Linux distributions on my machines, to keep an eye on their development.

One distribution that’s getting a lot of attention lately is elementary OS. I have been using it on a virtual machine and I love what they are doing. Then there is Ubuntu, one of the most popular Linux-based operating systems. The latest release of Ubuntu was announced this week and since I use all three in some capacity, I decided to see where they stand against each other.

Read more

SUSE Manager 3

Filed under
SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get KDE Plasma 5.6.2, Frameworks 5.21 and Mesa 11.2.0

Filed under
SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed users received many snapshots during the last two weeks, since the beginning of the April, so it's time to keep you guys up to speed with what's new in the rolling GNU/Linux distribution.

Read more

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • Free software equalizes economic segregation in schools

    I, along with other members of the openSUSE community, were fortunate enough to attend Rather’s keynote speech. Rather, who came from a small farming town in Texas and whose father was a ditch digger, credits self-determination, his wife and great teachers, who believe and care about students, as a key to his prosperity.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/14 & 15

    It seems to be difficult in the last weeks to find really interesting new features to write about. The fact that Plasma 5.6 and GNOME 3.20 are already available takes a lot of wind out of the sails. So a request to all of you: keep the things coming

  • openSUSE debug repository

    I am running openSUSE Leap 42.1 in a Vagrant box and while I had to debug a small executable file, I came across a message prompting me to install the glibc-debuginfo-2.19-19.1.x86_64 package.

  • Git work flows in the upcoming 2.7 release

    The upcoming Open Build Service (OBS) 2.7 release will deliver massive improvements to the way we are dealing with git sources for builds.

    OBS was designed for Linux distribution creation, not software development. In your typical distribution creation work flow you get a new upstream release in the form of a tar ball from time to time, and you add patches on top of that for local fixes. Nowadays the OBS is also used for development of software projects not in the context of a distribution. That work flow has completely different requirements: for every commit a new build, developers want continuous builds.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 1 Released, Available to Download Now

The Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 1 releases are now available to download. You know the drill by now: {num} Ubuntu flavors, some freshly pressed ISOs, plenty of new bugs to find and no guarantees that things won’t go boom. Read more Also: Ubuntu 16.10 Beta Launches for Opt-in Flavors, Adds GCC 6.2 and LibreOffice 5.2

Games for GNU/Linux

PC-BSD Becomes TrueOS, FreeBSD 11.0 Reaches RC2

  • More Details On PC-BSD's Rebranding As TrueOS
    Most Phoronix readers know PC-BSD as the BSD operating system derived from FreeBSD that aims to be user-friendly on the desktop side and they've done a fairly good job at that over the years. However, the OS has been in the process of re-branding itself as TrueOS. PC-BSD has been offering "TrueOS Server" for a while now as their FreeBSD-based server offering. But around the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 release they are looking to re-brand their primary desktop download too now as TrueOS.
  • FreeBSD 11.0-RC2 Arrives With Fixes
    The second release candidate to the upcoming FreeBSD 11 is now available for testing. FreeBSD 11.0-RC2 ships with various bug fixes, several networking related changes, Clang compiler fixes, and other updates. FreeBSD 11.0 is bringing updated KMS drivers, Linux binary compatibility layer improvements, UEFI improvements, Bhyve virtualization improvements, and a plethora of other work. Those not yet familiar with FreeBSD 11 can see the what's new guide.

Hosting, Servers, VMs and Containers

  • Open Source, Containers and the Cloud: News from ContainerCon and LinuxCon
    LinuxCon and ContainerCon, events focused on Linux, containers and open source software, wrapped up this week in Toronto. Here's a round-up of the announcements and insights related to cloud computing that emerged from the meeting. LinuxCon and ContainerCon are co-located events. That made for an interesting combination this year because Linux is an established technology, which is celebrating its twenty-fifth anniversary. In contrast, containers remain a new and emerging enterprise technology. (Yes, containers themselves are much older, but it has only been in the past three years, with the launch of Docker, that containers are becoming a big deal commercially.) The two events thus paired discussion of a very entrenched platform, Linux, with one that is still very much in development. But open source, the coding and licensing model behind both Linux and container platforms like Docker, tied everything together.
  • Citrix Enables NetScaler for Containers and Micro-Services
    At the LinuxCon ContainerCon event here, a core topic of discussion is about how to enable enterprises to be able to embrace containers. Citrix has a few ideas on how to help and is announcing enhancements to its NetScaler networking gear to enable load balancing for containers and micro-services.
  • Want to Work for a Cloud Company? Here’s the Cream of the Crop
    What do Asana, Greenhouse Software, WalkMe, Chef Software, and Sprout Social have in common? They’ve been deemed the very best privately held “cloud” companies to work for, according to new rankings compiled by Glassdoor and venture capital firm Battery Ventures. For “The 50 Highest Rated Private Cloud Computing Companies,” Glassdoor and Battery worked with Mattermark to come up with a list of non-public companies that offer cloud-based services, and then culled them, making sure that each entry had at least 30 Glassdoor reviews, Neeraj Agrawal, Battery Ventures general partner told Fortune.
  • Red Hat Updates its Kernel-based Virtual Machine
    Red Hat updated its Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM)-powered virtualization platform for both Linux- and Windows-based workloads.
  • Red Hat Virtualization 4 Takes on Proprietary Competition
    Red Hat continues to move well beyond its core enteprise Linux-based roots with a string of new releases. The company has announced the general availability of Red Hat Virtualization 4, the latest release of its Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) -powered virtualization platform. It fully supports OpenStack’s Neutron – the networking project leveraged in SDNs. The company emphasizes that Red Hat Virtualization 4 challenges the economics and complexities of proprietary virtualization solutions by providing a fully-open, high-performing, more secure, and centrally managed platform for both Linux- and Windows-based workloads. It combines an updated hypervisor, advanced system dashboard, and centralized networking for users’ evolving workloads.