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SUSE

Server: Cloudwashing by SUSE and Openwashing by Red Hat

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Why Hybrid Cloud is About to Get a Whole Lot Easier

    It seems like analysts, vendors and IT decision makers have been talking about “hybrid cloud” for the longest time. The concept has been around for at least a decade – and that’s a really long time in the IT industry. Is it still important? Absolutely.
    Almost every piece of cloud market research I read shows the majority of enterprises are focusing on a hybrid cloud strategy. Why? Because they all need increased agility, innovation and productivity, better cost optimization and improved customer experience.

  • The Open Organization guide to Red Hat Summit 2019 [Ed: The 'Open Organization' slant in Red Hat Summit 2019 with Microsoft CEO as keynote because it's all about money, not "open" or "free" (just proprietary and expensive]

    When Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst published The Open Organization in 2015, he didn't just release a book. He catalyzed a global conversation about the ways open principles are reshaping organizational culture and design.

  • Developing distributed applications and services for tomorrow: a proof of concept

    Innovation is accelerating across the automobile industry, bringing advances in the in-vehicle experience. Connected vehicle technologies are opening up new business models and providing a whole range of new software and data-driven services.

    When it comes to new software and data-driven services, the possibilities are immense. But there is one trend many use cases have in common: they are becoming more distributed. To provide a great user experience, connected in-vehicle services often need to integrate increasingly diverse data.

SUSE and Red Hat

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Two New Open Source Projects From SAP: Dan Lahl

    In this episode of Let’s Talk, Daniel Lahl, Vice President (Product Marketing) – SAP talks about the two new Open Source projects at SAP.

  • A Special Offer for SAP HANA on IBM Power Systems Early Adopters

    In my blog, “Is time running out for your SAP Linux support?”, I talked about SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications 11 SP4 soon reaching its March 31, 2019 end date for General Support. This date has passed. To maintain support you have a choice of either upgrading to a currently supported version or adding Long Term Service Pack Support (LTSS). But if you’re an early adopter of SAP HANA on IBM Power Systems, then it’s not just a matter of upgrading the Linux OS. You need to migrate your data from Big Endian to Little Endian format. Also, your data is still probably in an SAP HANA 1.0 database so you’ll also need to migrate to SAP HANA 2.0. All of this can take significant time and effort.

  • Rounding out the list of Red Hat Summit keynotes [Ed: A summit led by Microsoft CEO's (first in the list); Red Hat sold out.]

    For the last few months, we’ve been sharing the exciting and thought-provoking keynotes that you can look forward to at Red Hat Summit 2019. From hybrid cloud, containers and cloud-native app platforms to management, automation and more, customers, partners and technology industry leaders from around the world will come together for a high-energy week of innovation, education and collaboration.

    In our 14th year, we’re bringing you inspirational, educational and actionable content, industry-shaping news, and innovative practices from customers and partners from across industries. With just fours week to go, we’re proud to announce the last round of partners and customers who will be taking the stage in Boston, May 7-9.

  • Leadership of OpenJDK 8 and OpenJDK 11 Transitions to Red Hat

    OpenJDK is an open source implementation of Java, one of the most widely-used programming languages for building enterprise-grade applications. In its role as steward of OpenJDK 8 and OpenJDK 11 update releases, Red Hat will work with the community to enable continued innovation in Java.

    Red Hat has been a member of the OpenJDK community since 2007 and is one of the largest contributors to the project. Red Hat’s long-time Java technical lead, Andrew Haley, was appointed as project lead for OpenJDK 8 and OpenJDK 11 in February 2019. He has been an active member of the OpenJDK governing board for seven years and, in this capacity, helps to guide the future direction of Java and OpenJDK.

    In addition to its work within individual OpenJDK communities, Red Hat leads the upstream development of Shenandoah, a high-performance garbage collector that is now part of OpenJDK 12.

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • The introvert’s guide to Red Hat Summit

    Events like Red Hat Summit fill me with excitement and, admittedly, a bit of trepidation. Thousands of people, a schedule packed with informative and useful sessions, and opportunities to meet and talk with folks doing exciting work in open source sounds great. It also, well, sounds a bit exhausting if you’re an introvert. It doesn’t have to be, though, and Red Hat wants everyone to feel welcome, comfortable, and able to fully enjoy the event. With that in mind, read on for some strategies and resources for success.

    Introverts aren’t (necessarily) misanthropes, we just tend to like smaller gatherings and less noisy and intense social situations. Even those can be fun, in limited doses. The thing about a large conference like Red Hat Summit, though, is that it’s a huge helping of people and activities turned up to 11. Don’t worry, you can still go and have a great experience, it just takes a little bit of planning.

  • Kubernetes Cluster vs Master Node

    In Software engineering, a cluster resembles a group of nodes that work together to distribute the work load. Additionally clustering helps in fault tolerance, by having a cluster acting as a secondary (backup) to a primary cluster.

  • The Bright (green) Lights of Denver

    You may have read some of the release notes or press coverage from the recent release of OpenStack Stein, in which case you’ll know that Stein introduced multi-factor authentication receipts for Keystone. This really just completes the work that was originally begun in the Ocata release, making it easier to implement a challenge/response mechanism in your OpenStack environment. Multi-factor authentication is quickly becoming the norm in everything from free online email services, to social media sites and more – catching up with the security that most, if not all online banking services have been offering for some time now.

  • How Big is a Container, Really?

    One of the first questions in any discussion about cluster sizing tends to be “How many containers are you running?”. While this is a good data point (especially if you are pushing the scheduler to its limit) it doesn’t show the whole story.
    We tend to abstract out a container as this homogeneous building block that represents any workload.

    This abstraction has a lot of value for learning how containers work and how the system treats all workloads similarly (which is hugely valuable). However, it falls down when we start looking at planning our hardware requirements.

SUSE Benefits From Red Hat Acquisition and Other Red Hat News

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • How SUSE Benefits From Red Hat Acquisition

    SUSE CEO talks about the impact of Red Hat’s acquisition by IBM.

  • How Red Hat Helped Make Open Source A Global Phenomenon

    By the mid 90s, Microsoft ruled over the technology world. Through its Windows operating system, which ran roughly 95% of the world’s computers, it was able to leverage control over much of what other companies did and built commanding positions in productivity software and other facets of the industry.
    Yet even as the tech giant was at its peak, a danger loomed. Like barbarians at the gate, hordes of developers banded together in online communities to collaborate on their own software. Unlike Microsoft’s proprietary products, nobody owned these and anybody was able to alter or customized them as they pleased.
    Steve Ballmer would come to regard open source software as a cancer. Yet where Microsoft’s CEO saw danger, two entrepreneurs saw an opportunity. They created a company called Red Hat that was focused wholly on the Linux open source software, a seemingly crazy idea at the time. Today, however, it has grown into a major global enterprise. Here’s how they did it.

  • Vodafone Egypt Reboots Customer Experience with Red Hat’s Hybrid Cloud and Cloud-Native Technologies

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that Vodafone Egypt has deployed Red Hat Cloud Suite to advance its customer-first digital transformation initiative. The project includes rebuilding Vodafone Egypt’s website using a microservices-based architecture, and adopting DevOps methodology to better streamline operations and help boost productivity, offering a path for faster time-to-market for new innovations.

  • Managed, enabled, empowered: 3 dimensions of leadership in an open organization

    "Empowerment" seems to be the latest people management buzzword. And it's an important consideration for open organizations, too. After all, we like to think these open organizations thrive when the people inside them are equipped to take initiative to do their best work as they see fit. Shouldn't an open leader's goal be complete and total empowerment of everyone, in all parts of the organization, doing all types of work?

  • Testing Small Scale Scrum in the real world

    Scrum is built on the three pillars of inspection, adaptation, and transparency. Our empirical research is really the starting point in bringing scrum, one of the most popular agile implementations, to smaller teams. As presented in the diagram below, we are now taking time to inspect this framework and principles by testing them in real-world projects

  • Announcing the evolution of the Red Hat Certified Engineer program

SUSE Promoting Events and Proprietary Software

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SUSE

Return of the Rodents: Xfce is back in openSUSE Tumbleweed Installer

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SUSE

We are very pleased to announce that installing the lightweight and slim desktop environment Xfce in openSUSE Tumbleweed just got faster and hassle-free!

Along with GNOME and KDE Plasma, Xfce can now be conveniently selected from the installer’s main screen, as your desktop environment from both DVD installer and net installer. All this is combined with a carefully picked selection of packages that rounds off our offered system to get you started quickly and easily.

Our Xfce team has invested a lot of work in the past months to optimize the “cute mouse” by focusing on the desktop and the underlying rolling release of Tumbleweed. It features applications that better suit the desktop, as well as new modern themes that make the default experience refreshing and enjoyable.

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BSD, GNU and SUSE Events

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GNU
OSS
SUSE
BSD
  • t2k19 Hackathon Report: Ken Westerback on dhclient, disklabel, and more
  • Purism at LibrePlanet 2019 – Showcasing the Librem 5 Phone

    This year’s edition of LibrePlanet went on so well, we had people stopping by to ask questions before the conference was open for the day.

    Purism’s booth was busy, and people were happy to see us. Nearly everyone we talked to had been following our progress, and everyone was excited to see things in-person. We showcased the fourth version of Librem laptops, and made regular demonstrations of both PureBoot on a Librem 13v4 and Librem Key. Above all, we drew a lot of excitement around the in-person viewing of the Librem 5 devkit. So much excitement, we really wanted to write about the commotion caused by the Librem 5 development – and specially about the devkit demonstration – not only among the audience but also within our own team members.

    The Librem 5 phone may still be months away from delivery, but the Librem 5 devkit is under very rapid development. Showcasing our progress is something we’re very proud of, so at the first day of LibrePlanet we whet the appetite of audience members by showcasing sub ten-second boot times from powered-off state to unlock-screen… and we also showed off the initial application support of calling, settings, chat/sms, and browser.

  • SUSECON – Cloud Talkin’

    With over 1,000 attendees from 45 different countries, SUSECON was a truly global affair with a uniquely country twist.

OpenSUSE and SUSE Videos From Swapnil Bhartiya of TFIR

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SUSE
  • Why You Should Attend OpenSUSE Conference

    The openSUSE Conference begins Friday, May 24, at 10 a.m. and will finish on Sunday, May 26. The openSUSE Conference is the annual openSUSE community event that brings people from around the world together to meet and collaborate. The organized talks, workshops, and BoF sessions provide a framework around more casual meet ups and hack sessions. A party here and there provides the time to relax and have fun, making connections on a more personal level.

  • SUSE CTO of Americas talks about container adoption

    In this interview Brent Schroeder - Americas' CTO of SUSE talks about some trends he has noticed in the industry.

  • Thomas Di Giacomo Interview at SUSECON

    In this interview Thomas Di Giacomo of SUSE and Swapnil Bhartiya of TFIR discussed a wide range of topics including the new role of Di Giacomo, what happened to SUSE' CTO office; how digital transformation is a misleading term and games. Yes. Games!

  • Exclusive Interview with SUSE CEO, Nils Brauckmann
  • Nils Brauckmann Talks about the evolution of SUSE

    SUSE CEO Nils Brauckmann discusses the evolution of SUSE under his leadership. If you like our coverage, you can become

Red Hat and SUSE on CRI-O

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Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • Red Hat contributes CRI-O to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    Today CRI-O, a project started at Red Hat in 2016 to be an Open Container Initiative-based implementation of the Kubernetes Container Runtime Interface, is being contributed to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). This project joins cornerstone containers and Kubernetes projects we’ve been a part of like etcd and others to join a neutral home for stewardship.

    This is a step forward for the containers and CRI-O community because it brings the project into the same home as Kubernetes, which benefits users given its close interdependency. CRI-O and Kubernetes follow the same release cycle and deprecation policy.

    CRI-O already has a variety of maintainers outside of Red Hat including Intel and SUSE. Red Hat plans to continue participating in developing CRI-O, especially as a part of our enterprise Kubernetes product, Red Hat OpenShift. With our heritage and dedication to open source software and community-driven development, CRI-O can benefit the community even further within CNCF housed next to Kubernetes.

  • Welcome to the CNCF, CRI-O!

    CRI-O, the Open Container Initiative (OCI) implementation of the Kubernetes Container Runtime Interface (CRI), will join the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) incubator today. The project provides an alternative container runtime for Kubernetes and was founded back in 2016 (originally known as OCID) with the introduction of the Kubernetes CRI. CRI-O focuses on its first principles of stability and reliability. This has been proven since one and a half year for now and CRI-O synchronizes its releases with Kubernetes to ensure these principles for the future, too. The projects popularity raised over the past years that it is now the best solution to run Kubernetes workloads in a secure fashion. Currently, CRI-O has worldwide 106 contributors and 9 maintainers coming from Intel, Red Hat, and SUSE. SUSE CaaS Platform version 3 provides it as a technology preview, where CRI-O can be chosen during the installation. No further workload changes are needed to switch from Docker or containerd to CRI-O.

SUSE: SUSECON, 'Cloud' and Microsoft/HANA/SAP

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SUSE
  • Brauckmann upbeat at first SUSECON since independence

    SUSECON 2019 opens in Nashville, TN as CEO Nils Brauckmann lays out his vision for growth and the future in front of over 1000 attendees.

  • SUSE: A new mantra from edge to core to cloud

    Enterprise Linux company SUSE loves Linux, obviously.

    As Linux lives so prevalently and prolifically in the server rooms of so many cloud datacentres, the firm has worked to develop technologies designed to help those datacentres become software-defined.

    A software-defined datacentre being one that relies upon programmable elements of code that control, shape and manage many of the network actions that we might (perhaps 10-years ago, certainly 20-years ago) have relied upon dedicated highly specialised hardware for.

  • SUSE eyes wider horizons for enterprise open source

    The Computer Weekly Developer Network and Open Source Insider team is digging into four days of open source goodness at SUSECON.

    SUSE these days describes itself as a provider of enterprise-grade open source software-defined infrastructure and a set of application delivery tools.

    As SUSE regional director for EMEA West region Matt Eckersall has already told Computer Weekly, SUSECON is not just dedicated to SUSE enterprise-class Linux, the event also opens its focus to OpenStack, Ceph storage, Kubernetes, openATTIC, Cloud Foundry plus a range of other open source (and some proprietary) projects.

  • SUSE delivers first Linux image for SAP Hana large instances on Azure [Ed: SUSE proudly delivers proprietary software on an NSA surveillance platform maintained by Microsoft. SUSE refuses to evolve.]
  • Hitting Microsoft's metal: SUSE flings Enterprise Linux at SAP HANA on Azure [Ed: SUSE is still working for Microsoft (even after the Novell sellout of 2006)]

    SUSE modestly considers itself to be the "leading Linux platform" for SAP HANA and, while neither it nor Microsoft will be drawn on how many of the Linux instances on Azure have a green chameleon tinge to them, Daniel Nelson, vice president of Products and Solutions for SUSE, told El Reg: "We see it growing for us faster than market growth."

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora: GSoC, Fedora Program Management, PHP, Fedora Infrastructure, Test Day and EPEL

  • Fedora Community Blog: GSoC summer 2019: Fedora Gooey Karma

    The day GSoC projects list was published I started sorting out all the organizations that I’d enjoy working with. Being a Linux user/enthusiast I filtered down to a bunch of Linux distros and desktop managers. Sorting out all the projects, Fedora-Gooey-Karma seemed to be a project that suited the skills I have. Once I was sure that Fedora Gooey Karma is a project that I would love to work on during the summer, I mailed @sumantro about the project. We talked about the project on mails.

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-37

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. Fedora 31 Beta is go! I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • PHP version 7.2.23RC1 and 7.3.10RC1

    Release Candidate versions are available in testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests (for x86_64 only), and also as base packages. RPM of PHP version 7.3.10RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 30-31 or remi-php73-test repository for Fedora 29 and Enterprise Linux. RPM of PHP version 7.2.23RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 29 or remi-php72-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

  • Karsten Hopp: Onboarding Fedora Infrastructure

    I'm using / working on Fedora since FC-1 and just recently joined the Infrastructure team.

  • Fedora Community Blog: Fedora 31 Gnome Test Day 2019-09-18

    Wednesday, 2019-09-18 is the Fedora 31 Gnome Test Day! As part of changes Gnome 3.34 in Fedora 31, we need your help to test if everything runs smoothly!

  • EPEL Bug: Bash errors on recent EL-8 systems.

    Last week, I got asked about a problem with using EPEL-8 on Oracle Enterprise Linux 8 where trying to install packages failed due to bad license file. I duplicated the problem on RHEL-8 which had not happened before some recent updates.

Games: CodeWeavers, gamepad and Cascade

  • Linux 5.4 To Fix Many Newer 64-bit Windows Games On Wine / Steam Play

    A kernel patch from CodeWeavers is landing in the Linux 5.4 kernel and will help some 64-bit Windows games run nicely under Wine (and the likes of CrossOver / Valve's Proton) with newer Intel and AMD systems. With the few x86 Assembly patches for Linux 5.4 is a UMIP addition by CodeWeavers' Brendan Shanks that ends up being quite important for running a number of Windows games under Proton/Wine on newer AMD/Intel Linux systems.

  • You may want to hold off on Linux Kernel 5.3 and systemd 243 if you use a gamepad

    Did you do a big system upgrade recently and notice you're having gamepad issues? You're not alone. Time to downgrade perhaps. To be clear this might only be an issue for the more bleeding-edge distributions which update more often, or those of you who are doing some manual updates to their system. The distributions that update more slowly like Ubuntu are likely unaffected right now.

  • Cascade – a turn-based text arcade game

    I wrote this game about 20 years ago. Glad to see it still compiled out of the box on the latest Linux distro! Download it from here. If anyone can remember the name or any details of the original 1980s MS-DOS game that I copied the idea from, please let me know in the comments.

GNOME's Sammy Fung and Bin Li

  • Molly de Blanc: Meet the GNOMEies: Sammy Fung

    Sammy is a freelancer, community organizer, and GNOME enthusiast from Hong Kong. For almost 20 years, Sammy has been using, GNOME and building community in Asia.

  • Bin Li: GUADEC 2019

    Thessaloniki is very peaceful place, every morning I liked to walk along the seaside to the venue. As usual, it was a great and enjoyable GUADEC, thanks to everyone who helped to make it. In core days I attended a lot of great talks in this year, I learned a lot of latest status of GNOME, and here are my favorite talks, “Managing GNOME Sessions with Systemd“, “State of the Shell“, “Packing up Boxes“, “Modernizing Desktop Linux Development with Containers“, “Is the Linux Desktop Really Dead?“. I also enjoy watching Lighting talks every year. In this year Britt Yazel’s lighting talks, I knew the GUADEC App was based on Connfa, and it’s also an open source project. This App is very convenient, I could check schedule at any time.

SUSE: YaST Development Sprint 84 and SUSE 'in Space'

  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 84

    The YaST Team finished yet another development sprint last week and we want to take the opportunity to let you all glance over the engine room to see what’s going on. Today we will confess an uncomfortable truth about how we manage the Qt user interface, will show you how we organize our work (or at least, how we try to keep the administrative part of that under control) and will give you a sneak peak on some upcoming YaST features and improvements. Let’s go for it!

  • Lunar Vacation Planning

    HPE, one of SUSE’s most important partners in High-Performance Computing and the advancement of science and technology, is now building NASA’s new supercomputer named “Aitken” to support Artemis and future human missions to the moon. HPE’s “Aitken” supercomputer will be built at NASA’s Ames Research Center and will run SUSE Linux Enterprise HPC (co-located where the Pleiades supercomputer – also SUSE-based – has been advancing research for several years). Aitken will run extremely complex simulations for entry, descent and landing on the moon as part of the Artemis program. The missions include landing the next humans on the lunar south polar region by 2024 (on the rim of the Shackleton crater, which experiences constant indirect sunlight for a toasty -300 degrees Fahrenheit).