Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SUSE

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • Rolling to Leap 42.3

    The bits and pieces needed for a rolling development phase of Leap 42.3 are now up and running!

  • OpenSUSE Leap 42.3 Will Be Developed In A Rolling Manner

    Ubuntu dropped their official alpha/betas long ago, Fedora 27 is dropping their alphas, and openSUSE is also shifting their development approach and will get rid of alpha and beta releases. OpenSUSE Leap 42.3 will be developed in a "rolling" manner although the release will not be a rolling-release post-release, unlike openSUSE Tumbleweed.

  • YaST development during Hack Week 15

    During this Hack Week, some of our team members invested quite some time working in YaST related projects. But, what’s even better, some people from outside the team worked also in YaST projects. Thank you guys!

openSUSE.Asia Summit and openSUSE Tumbleweed

Filed under
SUSE
  • Committee Accepting Proposals for openSUSE.Asia Summit

    The openSUSE.Asia organization committee is accepting proposals to host the openSUSE.Asia Summit during the second half of 2017. The openSUSE.Asia Summit is the largest annual openSUSE conference in Asia and is attended by contributors and enthusiasts from all over Asia.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.10, Users Get Mesa 17

    Good news for users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system, as openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio informed the community about the latest updates that landed in the repositories in the last week of February 2017.

    It would appear that only four snapshots were released for openSUSE Tumbleweed users last week, but they brought a bunch of goodies that many will adore, starting with the recently released Linux 4.10.1 kernel. openSUSE Tumbleweed is also proudly powered by the newest Mesa 17.0 3D Graphics Library, for a better gaming experience.

Tumbleweed Gets Kernel 4.10.1, Mesa 17, Python 3.6

Filed under
SUSE

The joy and experimentation of Hack Week didn’t keep openSUSE Tumbleweed from continuing to roll.

Since the last news article on Tumbleweed two weeks ago, there have been eight snapshots featuring new software packages.

The most recent snapshot to land in the repositories was snapshot 20170228, which provided less than a handful of packages.

Read more

Also: OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Now Running On Linux 4.10, Updated Flatpak & More

Events: g2k16 Hackathon, SUSE Hackweek, LinuxFest Northwest 2017

Filed under
OSS
SUSE
  • g2k16 Hackathon Report: Matthieu Herrb on xenodm

    I started the hackathon by upgrading a number of packages in Xenocara. The most noteworthy being the XCB (X protocol C-language Bindings) suite updated to the most recent 1.12 version.

  • Hackweek projet: Let's Encrypt DNS-01 validation for acme.sh with Gandi LiveDNS

    Last week was SUSE Hackweek and one of my projects was to get Let's Encrypt configured and working on my NAS.

    Let's Encrypt is a project aimed at providing SSL certificates for free, in an automated way.

  • openSUSE at LinuxFest Northwest 2017

    LinuxFest Northwest 2017, coming up the first weekend in May, promises to continue its tradition of providing a unique, active, fun experience for open-source enthusiasts at all experience levels. openSUSE continues its long-term sponsorship of the event, and we are looking forward to having a lot of fun! Submit your session proposals by March 1, 2017!

    LinuxFest Northwest, if you’re not familiar, is one of the largest community-centric conferences in the USA, and a free+libre event (no attendance fees and registration is optional) promoting open source, open hardware, and community involvement. Now in its 16th year, with an audience rapidly approaching 2,000 people, the event continues to grow, attract a broader audience, and redefine the experience of a weekend conference. With a Linux Game Den, a Robotics Lab, a Job Fair (new this year), community mini-summits, as well as the expo hall and 8 – 10 parallel tracks of sessions, LFNW is a week of conference stuffed into a weekend.

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • OBS got the power!

    Old build workers, rack mounted

    Old build workers, rack mounted

    One year after introducing a new kind of Open Build Service worker machines, the “lambkins”, the openSUSE Build Service got a big hardware refresh. The new machines, sponsored by SUSE, are equipped with:

    2,8GHz AMD Opteron Processors (6348)
    256 GB RAM
    one 120 GB SSD

    Four of them are located in a chassis with a height of 2 units and run 12-16 workers on them (virtual machines, that are building packages).

    That new build power allowed us to remove some of old machines from the pool. The unified hardware makes the management of the machines a lot easier now, even if there are still the most powerful old machines left.

  • openSUSE Heroes December meeting – final results

    While we had some fun and good food and drinks, we also managed to discuss a lot during the three days in the Nuremberg headquarter. This was needed because this was the first time that the Heroes came together in their current form. In the end, we managed to do no coding and even (nearly) no administration – but instead we started to discuss our (internal and external) policies and work flows – and did some decisions regarding the next steps and the future of the openSUSE infrastructure.

  • New and improved Inqlude web site

    During last year's Summer of Code I had the honor of mentoring Nanduni Indeewaree Nimalsiri. She worked on Inqlude, the comprehensive archive of third party Qt libraries, improving the tooling to create a better structured web site with additional features such as categorization by topic. She did an excellent job with it and all of her code ended up on the master branch. But we hadn't yet made the switch to change the default layout of the web site to fully take advantage of all her work. As part of SUSE's 15th Hack Week, which is taking place this week, I took some time to change that, put up some finishing touches, and switch the Inqlude web site to the new layout. So here we are. I proudly present the new improved home page of Inqlude.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Powered by Linux Kernel 4.9.9 and Mesa 13.0.4, Update Now

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio reports today, February 16, about the latest software updates and technologies that landed in the stable repositories during last week and the beginning of this one via a total of six snapshots.

Read more

Kurdish Group Hacks openSUSE Linux Website

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

In this day and age, you never know where you're going to run across a political statement. For example, if you visited the openSUSE News website on Monday, you would have been treated to an image of the Kurdistan flag, along with a rather potty mouthed anti-ISIS statement.

Yup. The openSUSE site had been defaced, by a hacker identifying himself as MuhmadEmad and connected with a group called "KurDish HaCk3Rs." A screenshot of the defaced site is available -- thanks to Roy Schestowitz, publisher of Tux Machines and Techrights -- but we'll not show it here due to an F-bomb in the message. The good news is that little harm seems to have been done and the site was quickly returned to normal by way of a recent backup.

Read more

OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Gnome - Better but not really

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

It is time to give Leap a second chance. Let me be extra corny. Give leap a chance. Yes. Well, several weeks ago, I reviewed the Plasma edition of the latest openSUSE release, and while it was busy firing all cannon, like a typical Stormtrooper, most of the beams did not hit the target. It was a fairly mediocre distro, delivering everything but then stopping just short of the goodness mark.

I will now conduct a Gnome experiment. Load the distro with a fresh new desktop environment, and see how it behaves. We did something rather similar with CentOS recently, with some rather surprising results. Hint. Maybe we will get lucky. Let's do it.

Read more

Also new: Tumbleweed Snapshots Bring Users New Vulkan, 4.9.7 Kernel

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Linux 4.9.7, GCC 6.3.1, Wine 2.1, and New Vulkan

Filed under
SUSE

If you're using the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system on your personal computer, we'd like to inform you today about the latest software updates that arrived in the distro's repositories during last week and the first days of this one.

Read more

Kurdish Hacker Posts Anti-ISIS Message on openSUSE's Website, Data Remains Safe

Filed under
SUSE

Softpedia was informed by Dr. Roy Schestowitz that the openSUSE News (news.opensuse.org) website got defaced by Kurdish hacker MuhmadEmad on the day of February 6, 2017.

It would appear that the server where the news.opensuse.org website is hosted is isolated from the rest of openSUSE's infrastructure, which means that the hacker did not have access to any contributor data, such as email and passwords, nor to the ISO images of the openSUSE Linux operating system.

We already talked with openSUSE Chairman Richard Brown, who confirms for Softpedia that the offered openSUSE downloads remain safe and consistent, and users should not worry about anything. The vigilant openSUSE devs immediately restored the news.opensuse.org website from a recent backup, so everything is operating normally at this time.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

GTK+ 3.92

  • GTK4's Vulkan Renderer Is Close To Complete
    Red Hat's Matthias Clasen has written a blog post concerning the changes found in the big GTK+ 3.92 development release that is pushing towards the GTK4 tool-kit release.
  • GTK+ 3.92
    Yesterday, we released GTK+ 3.92.1, 重庆市. Since it has been a while since the last 3.91 release, here is a brief look at the major changes. This release is another milestone on our way towards GTK+ 4. And while a lot still needs to be done, this release allows a first glimpse at some of the things we hope to achieve in GTK+ 4.

Servers: Kubernetes in plain English, Serverless, Staging

  • How to explain Kubernetes in plain English
    Talk containers with an IT pro for more than a minute and the conversation will inevitably turn to container management and orchestration. It might be easy to deploy a container, but operationalizing containers at scale — especially in concert with microservices — is not for weekend enthusiasts. It requires planning, and most experts say an orchestration tool is a must.
  • The Trouble With Promises: Patrick Debois Explains Serverless And 'Service-Full' Culture
  • Center stage: Best practices for staging environments
    We’re talking about staging because no one talks about it. It’s mentioned in passing as the annoying sidekick to production. It’s the expected and completely necessary part of the deployment cycle barely touched by schools or internships. It’s considered such an obvious part of architecture that no one mentions it, no one details it, many people do it wrong—and some don’t do it at all.

Linux Foundation: Civil Infrastructure Platform, Community Data License Agreement (CDLA)

  • Civil Infrastructure Platform releases Linux system for management of critical systems
    The Civil Infrastructure Platform project has released CIP Core, a reference minimal file system that offers a customizable environment that developers can use to test the CIP kernel and core packages. CIP aims to provide a base layer of industrial grade open source software components, tools and methods to enable long-term management of critical systems.
  • Open-sourcing data will make big data bigger than ever
    Free software has been with computing since day one, but proprietary software ruled businesses. It took open source and its licenses to transform how we coded our programs. Today, even Microsoft has embraced open source. Now, The Linux Foundation has created a new open license framework, Community Data License Agreement (CDLA), which may do for data what open source did for programming. In Prague, at Open Source Summit Europe, The Linux Foundation announced a new family of open-data licenses. The CDLA licenses are an effort to define a licensing framework to support collaborative communities built around curating and sharing "open" data.
  • Linux Foundation Launches Open Data Licensing Agreements

OSS: PC-MOS, Open Source Initiative, ErosCoin, Rackspace

  • PC-MOS operating system goes open source (30 years after release)
    These days if you’re using a desktop computer you’re probably running Windows, although there’s also a good chance you’re using OS X or maybe Chrome OS or one of a number of GNU/Linux distributions. But back in the 80s, it’s wasn’t really clear who the dominant players of the future would be.
  • MS-DOS variant PC-MOS/386 reborn as open source
    Do you still long to run WordPerfect 5.1, Lotus 1-2-3 4, or Doom on DOS? Well, if you do, there's a new way to revisit the PC world of the 1980s: The newly open-sourced PC-MOS/386 v501. PC-MOS, for those who weren't around in 1987, was a multi-user MS-DOS clone by Norcross, GA's The Software Link. It ran most standard DOS and 386's protected mode applications. I reviewed it back in the day -- although I can't find my article from Computer Digest, a Washington DC regional general interest computer newspaper, I recall it worked well.
  • Open Source Initiative, and Open Source Software Movement Celebrate Twenty Years
    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), the global non-profit dedicated to raising awareness and adoption of open source software, announced today plans for the “Open Source 20th Anniversary World Tour” to run through 2018. Open source software is now ubiquitous, recognized across industries as a fundamental component to infrastructure, as well as a critical factor for driving innovation. Over the past twenty years, the OSI has worked to promote and protect open source software, development, and communities, championing software freedom in society through education, collaboration, and infrastructure, stewarding the Open Source Definition (OSD), and preventing abuse of the ideals and ethos inherent to the open source movement.
  • ErosCoin – An open source solution for blockchain payment industries
    Possibly the largest single factor currently holding cryptocurrencies back from mass adoption is their difficulty of use for the average person. While Bitcoin and Ethereum both provide the ability to transfer value quickly and securely without borders, they both suffer from a steep learning curve, which limits interest from merchants, consumers and payment providers, and restricts growth of their platforms. EROSCOIN is setting out to create a new blockchain that is very significantly differentiated from other existing cryptocurrencies, giving the industry a payment solution that can help to expand the ecosystem and expand user adoption.
  • 7 years of open source: Cloud Foundry, DiffBlue & Quest
  • Rackspace kills discount cloud hosting for open source projects
    Rackspace has announced it will no longer be offering discounts on hosting for open source projects, although it will only apply to new customers rather than those with projects already up and running on the platform.