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SUSE

SUSE aims to tackle skills shortage in open source in ME

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OSS
SUSE

SUSE is teaming up with the training arm of technology distributor Ingram Micro to offer a set of 18 instructed-led SUSE training modules in the Middle East.

A Linux Foundation study last year found out that 87% of hiring managers say open skills are hard to come by.

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OpenSUSE 42.3

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SUSE
  • openSUSE 42.3 Released, Here’s What’s New

    After 8 months of continues development. The openSUSE team has just announced openSUSE 42.3. Which is considered to be the latest release of the stable openSUSE branch (called Leap).

  • openSUSE Leap 42.3 Linux-based operating system is here -- download it now

    Variety is both a gift and curse for Linux on the desktop. On the one hand, it is nice that there are so many operating systems based on the kernel from which to choose. On the other, it can sometimes feel like the community is very fragmented. Not only is there tribalism between users of distributions, but desktop environments too. For instance, there is Ubuntu vs. Fedora and KDE vs. GNOME -- much like Coke vs. Pepsi and Chevy vs. Ford. This is just human nature, I suppose.

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Gives Smooth Desktop and Server Upgrade

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SUSE

The openSUSE Project released openSUSE Leap 42.3 today bringing the community version more closely aligned with its shared core of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack 3.

The mutual packages of both Leap and SLE distributions give seasoned Linux users, systems administrators, and developers even more reason to use the newest chameleon distribution.

Users are advised to take advantage of the seamless upgrade to Leap 42.3. Leap 42.2 reaches its end of maintenance in six months.

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Also: openSUSE Leap 42.3 Officially Released, Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 SP3

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Officially Released

Red Hat, Fedora, and SUSE News

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Red Hat CFO Pursues Cloud Agenda

    In 2012, when CFO spoke with Red Hat finance chief Charlie Peters, the company essentially had a single significant product offering, the operating system Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Five years later, the company is neck deep in its transformation to a company with a burgeoning position in cloud-platform technologies. And the current CFO, Eric Shander, happens to have the kind of deep technology experience that could help accelerate that evolution.

  • Red Hat's Boltron snaps together a modular Linux server

    Red Hat’s ongoing experiments with making its Linux distributions more modular and flexible have yielded a new sub-distribution of Fedora.

    Dubbed Fedora Boltron Server, the new prototype server project uses the various modularity technologies that Red Hat has been building into Fedora. Its goal is a Linux distribution in which multiple versions of the same system components can live and work side-by-side, non-destructively.

  • FAD Latam - Final Report

    The FADs (Fedora Activity Day) were technical in many cases, but this time We can to realize an organizational FAD that allowed the ambassadors to achieve objectives and to contribute to the community in a better way.

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  • openSUSE Leap zaps games, drives servers, loves DevOps

    The openSUSE Project has released openSUSE Leap 42.3.

    With this release we can see that the community version is now more closely aligned with the ‘shared core’ of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack 3.

openSUSE Leap 42.3: Get ready to upgrade

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SUSE

The openSUSE Leap distribution is about to make a new release, Leap 42.3.

While Leap is normally a 'point release' distribution, the development of Leap 42.3 has been conducted as if it were a 'rolling release', so since May I have had several of my systems running the 42.3 pre-release and following the development as it progressed.

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Servers: SUSE, Boltron, Virtual Machines, Containers, and 'Cloud' Computing

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Server
SUSE
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Real Time boosts app performance

    a Linux kernel that also offers applications and tools to manage and support a real-time environment. The kernel uses different scheduler queues and makes a distinction between normal processes and real-time processes. If there is a shortage of available resources, the Linux kernel will service the real-time resources first.

  • Boltron - Fedora Modular OS playground!

    Last summer at Flock Langdon White, Ralph Bean and couple folks around them announced work on new release tools and a project called Modularity. The goal was simple but aspirational - for couple years we've talked about rings proposal, splitting applications from the core of the OS, having alternatives available and easily installable for certain components and even though for all of these usecases you could always find a way how to achieve them they weren't really supported by the build infrastructure and software management tools. Once you would update your system or install something else it would usually break or do something unexpected. Modularity goal was to come up with a straightforward way how to deliver a bulk of content thru our build pipeline, offer multiple versions of components and different installation profiles. At the same time this new approach to delivering content would not break existing workflows and will be super easy for package maintainers.

  • Fedora Modular Server "Boltron" Preview Release Now Available

    Fedora developers have announced the first preview release of Boltron, their Modular Server effort. Fedora Modular Server is aiming to separate the lifecycle of applications from each other and the operating system itself. This is part of Fedora's broader modularity efforts while this Boltron preview today is about the server components.

  • Serverless Computing May Offer Better Economics Than Virtual Machines

    Serverless computing is becoming yet another way for cloud service providers to parse out access to enterprises looking to take advantage of virtualized services. Think containers, only slightly different.

    Serverless computing architectures are designed to reduce the amount of overhead associated with offering services in the cloud. This includes the ability for a cloud provider to dynamically manage server resources.

  • This Week in Scalability: System Backups in the Container Era

    As we gear up to release our next e-book on the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine (check with us in about a month), we have been reviewing how well K8s has been making its way into the enterprise — the true determinant of whether the software becomes an essential component of “the new stack,” so to speak.

    Reviewing our notes from Kubecon 2017, held earlier this year in Berlin, we found some powerful testimonies from both Salesforce and Comcast. Salesforce is using it in a pilot program to power three cloud-native services, with plans to be running 20 services by the end of the year. When the company’s engineers were considering different orchestration options, they immediately appreciated the smarts behind the Kubernetes. After all, many had come from other jobs managing large at-scale workloads. “We were, frankly, blown away. The development velocity was incredible, even back then,” Salesforce Principal Architect Steve Sandke said of the developers behind Kubernetes. “These people clearly knew what they were doing.”

  • Federal Cloud Computing

    Open source software (OSS) and cloud computing are distinctly different concepts that have independently grown in use, both in the public and private sectors, but have each faced adoption challenges by federal agencies. Both OSS and cloud computing individually offer potential benefits for federal agencies to improve their efficiency, agility, and innovation, by enabling them to be more responsive to new or changing requirements in their missions and business operations. OSS improves the way the federal government develops and also distributes software and provides an opportunity to reduce costs through the reuse of existing source code, whereas cloud computing improves the utilization of resources and enables a faster service delivery.

Servers: Containers, SOA, Microservices, and 'Cloud'

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Server
SUSE
  • Docker Leads OCI Release of v1.0 Runtime and Image Format Specifications

    Today marks an important milestone for the Open Container Initiative (OCI) with the release of the OCI v1.0 runtime and image specifications – a journey that Docker has been central in driving and navigating over the last two years. It has been our goal to provide low-level standards as building blocks for the community, customers and the broader industry. To understand the significance of this milestone, let’s take a look at the history of Docker’s growth and progress in developing industry-standard container technologies.

  • The Difference Between SOA and Microservices Isn’t Size

    For those that have been in the technology industry for some time, there is a tendency to compare or even equate the current microservices phenomenon with the more archaic Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) approach. This is done implicitly in many cases, but also quite explicitly with statements such as “microservices is nothing more than the new SOA” or “Amazon is the only company to get SOA right.”

    This is unsurprising, because it’s rooted in fact. For all of its other faults, SOA was a vision of enterprises that looks remarkably like what progressive organizations are building today with cloud native architectures composed of, among other things, microservices. Stripped to its core, SOA was the idea that architectures should be composed of services rather than monolithic applications.

  • First supported Linux for SAP HANA on Google Cloud

    With the addition of Google Cloud Platform, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications is now available on three major public cloud providers, including Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure.

SUSE Partners with Supermicro for OpenStack Cloud Hardware

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SUSE

Server vendor Supermicro has entered into a global partnership with Linux vendor SUSE that will benefit customers with new integrated OpenStack cloud hardware.

Patrick Quairoli, SUSE director of Alliance and Embedded Technology, told ServerWatch this is the first Supermicro SuperServeralliance agreement between SUSE and Supermicro.
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Events: OpenSUSE and Fedora in Germany and Peru

Filed under
Red Hat
SUSE
  • OpenSuSE Conference 2017 Nuremberg, Germany

    The event has grown and I felt a relaxed yet productive atmosphere when entering the venue. Just a few minutes after I arrived I hooked up with interesting people with even more interesting discussions. It was very nice to get together with all the Free Software friends I made over the last years. It was also pleasent to see the event becoming bigger and bigger. I take that as a sign that our community grows although it might also just be consolidation of events.

  • Fedora and GNOME at the Marine

    Our local Linux community “LinuXatUNI = Fedora + GNOME”  have received an invitation to do a talk regarding Linux security at the “THE MARINA OF WAR OF PERU”.

  • Closing the GNOME Peru Challenge 2017

    It’s been three months since a group of students from different universities decided to learn more about GNU/Linux in a local community. This idea started while LinuXatUNI had been organized and powered by Fedora and the GNOME project.

Linux Kernel 4.12 Coming Soon to openSUSE Tumbleweed, KDE Plasma 5.10.3 Is Here

Filed under
KDE
Linux
SUSE

openSUSE Project's Dominique Leuenberger is reporting today on the latest updates that landed in the main software repositories of the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system.

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Android Leftovers

Graphics: XWayland and Mesa

  • XWayland Gets Patches For Better EGLStreams Handling
    While the recently released X.Org Server 1.20 has initial support for XWayland with EGLStreams so X11 applications/games on Wayland can still benefit from hardware acceleration, in its current state it doesn't integrate too well with Wayland desktop compositors wishing to support it. That's changing with a new patch series.
  • Intel Mesa Driver Finally Supports Threaded OpenGL
    Based off the Gallium3D "mesa_glthread" work for threaded OpenGL that can provide a measurable win in some scenarios, the Intel i965 Mesa driver has implemented this support now too. Following the work squared away last year led in the RadeonSI driver, the Intel i965 OpenGL driver supports threaded OpenGL when the mesa_glthread=true environment variable is set.
  • Geometry & Tessellation Shaders For Mesa's OpenGL Compatibility Context
    With the recent Mesa 18.1 release there is OpenGL 3.1 support with the ARB_compatibility context for the key Gallium3D drivers, but Marek Olšák at AMD continues working on extending that functionality under the OpenGL compatibility context mode.
  • Mesa Begins Its Transition To Gitlab
    Following the news from earlier this month that FreeDesktop.org would move its infrastructure to Gitlab, the Mesa3D project has begun the process of adopting this Git-centered software.

Welcome to Ubuntu 18.04: Make yourself at GNOME. Cup of data-slurping dispute, anyone?

Comment Ubuntu 18.04, launched last month, included a new Welcome application that runs the first time you boot into your new install. The Welcome app does several things, including offering to opt you out of Canonical's new data collection tool. The tool also provides a quick overview of the new GNOME interface, and offers to set up Livepatch (for kernel patching without a reboot). In my review I called the opt-out a ham-fisted decision, but did note that if Canonical wanted to actually gather data, opt-out was probably the best choice. Read more

How CERN Is Using Linux and Open Source

CERN really needs no introduction. Among other things, the European Organization for Nuclear Research created the World Wide Web and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s largest particle accelerator, which was used in discovery of the Higgs boson. Tim Bell, who is responsible for the organization’s IT Operating Systems and Infrastructure group, says the goal of his team is “to provide the compute facility for 13,000 physicists around the world to analyze those collisions, understand what the universe is made of and how it works.” Read more