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SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets KDE Plasma 5.5.5, Python 3.5.1 to Arrive Very Soon

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SUSE

It looks like the new workers Tumbleweed received from SUSE are doing a very good job, as the rolling release openSUSE variant gets more snapshots than ever, which include all the latest GNU/Linux technologies.

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Also: openSUSE Is Now Looking for a Host City for Its openSUSE.Asia Summit 2016 Event

SUSE Now Offers Non-Disruptive Upgrades for OpenStack

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SUSE

SUSE has just made it a lot easier to upgrade the company’s OpenStack distribution, SUSE OpenStack Cloud 6 (SOC 6).

“If enterprise customers want to move to a new version of OpenStack they don’t have to replace and rebuild; they can now do a normal upgrade from an older version of OpenStack cloud to a newer version,” said SUSE CEO Nils Brauckmann. “What it means is that they can easily move with OpenStack innovation.”

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GNOME 3.20 to Hit the openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux Repositories by the End of March

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GNOME
SUSE

openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio informs users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system about the latest updates pushed to the main repositories via snapshot builds.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • TOSprint or not to sprint?
  • Highlights of development sprint 15

    We know you have missed the usual summary from the YaST trenches. But don’t panic, here you got it! As usual, we will only cover some highlights, saving you from the gory details of the not so exciting regular bugfixing.

  • Of gases, Qt, and Wayland

    Ever since the launch of Argon and Krypton, the openSUSE community KDE team didn’t really stand still: a number of changes (and potentially nice additions) have been brewing this week. This post recapitulates the most important one.

  • Argon and Krypton

    A recent announcement from openSUSE listed new live media (iso files) for Argon and Krypton. Argon is based on Leap 42.1, while Krypton is based on Tumbleweed.

    The openSUSE team maintains development repositories, in addition to the standard repos for the distributions. The development repos are where they build new or updated versions of the software for testing prior to adding that software to the standard repos. Both Argon and Krypton include some of these development repos.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2016/8

    We’re back on a weekly report – after all, there were some snapshots now. But first, at this place, a big THANK YOU to SUSE for the new openQA worker machine. It’s a pleasure to watch it run through a full openQA run of a snapshot in just about three hours.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets KDE Applications 15.12.2, Mesa 11.1.2, Glibc Fix

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SUSE

openSUSE Chairman Richard Brown informs us today about the fact that the new hardware sponsored by SUSE has been all set up, and it is now fully functional for producing more snapshots for the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling OS.

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RapidDisk / RapidCache 3.7 now available.

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Linux
News
Red Hat
Software
SUSE
Ubuntu

RapidDisk is an advanced Linux RAM Disk which consists of a collection of modules and an administration tool. Features include: Dynamically allocate RAM as block device. Use them as stand alone disk drives or even map them as caching nodes to slower local disk drives.

Pushed earlier this morning:

  • Cleaned up kernel module code.

openSUSE offers choices for KDE Git builds

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SUSE

Gravitational waves might be the cause of two new live image, spin off projects released today by members of the openSUSE community.

The release of Argon, which is a live installable image based on openSUSE Leap, and Krypton, which is a live installable image based on openSUSE Tumbleweed, offer packages built for KDE Git using stable and tested openSUSE technologies to track the latest development state of KDE software.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Is in Need of Workers, No New Snapshots Will Be Released

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SUSE

Instead of reporting what has been included in the latest snapshots released a few days ago for the rolling openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system, Douglas DeMaio writes about the fact that there are not enough workers to get the automated testing of openQA running at maximum capacity.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • openSUSE Conference returns to Nuremberg

    The openSUSE Conference will return to Nuremberg June 22 – 26 and have its conference at a cultural center in the heart of the Bavarian city.

    This year’s oSC will take place at the Z Bau, which was a former military barracks before being converted into a cultural center in 2014.

  • Sugar on openSUSE

    Built openSUSE Leap based Sugar test images on SUSE Studio, get it from here.

  • Tumbleweed waits for workers

    openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed goes through automated tests before a snapshot is released and heavily relies on openQA for the process of Tumbleweed to create regular snapshots.

    [...]

    The automated testing of openQA is currently running with only two workers left instead of the usual 10. The remaining workers are largely overloaded and can’t cope with the workload to produce new snapshots.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get systemd 228, GCC 5.3.1, Firefox 44.0, and New YaST

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SUSE

openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio writes today, February 10, in a lengthy blog post about the fact that the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling release operating system received no less than four snapshots this week with dozens of updated packages.

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More in Tux Machines

'Open' Processor

  • 25-core open source chip could pave way for monster 200,000-core PC
    PRINCETON UNIVERSITY BOFFINS have developed a 25-core open source processor that can be scaled to create a monster 200,000-core PC stuffed with 8,000 64-bit chips. The chip is called Piton after the metal spikes driven by rock climbers into mountain sides, and was presented at the Hot Chips symposium on high-performance computing in Cupertino this week.
  • New microchip demonstrates efficiency and scalable design
    Researchers at Princeton University have built a new computer chip that promises to boost performance of data centers that lie at the core of online services from email to social media. [...] Other Princeton researchers involved in the project since its 2013 inception are Yaosheng Fu, Tri Nguyen, Yanqi Zhou, Jonathan Balkind, Alexey Lavrov, Matthew Matl, Xiaohua Liang, and Samuel Payne, who is now at NVIDIA. The Princeton team designed the Piton chip, which was manufactured for the research team by IBM. Primary funding for the project has come from the National Science Foundation, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.
  • Manycore ‘Piton’ Climbs Toward 200,000-Core Peak

Android Leftovers

Lubuntu 16.10 Beta Out Now with Linux Kernel 4.4 LTS and the Latest LXDE Desktop

As part of today's Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Beta launch, Simon Quigley from the Lubuntu Linux team released the first Beta build of the upcoming Lubuntu 16.10 operating system. Read more Also: Ubuntu MATE 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Beta Removes the Heads-Up Display (HUD) Feature Ubuntu GNOME 16.10 Beta 1 Released with GNOME 3.20 and GNOME 3.22 Beta Apps Ubuntu 16.10 "Yakkety Yak" Beta Released, Ubuntu GNOME Has Experimental Wayland

Facebook open sources its computer vision tools