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SUSE

Events: HTTP Workshop, foss-north and SUSECON

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OSS
Web
SUSE
  • Daniel Stenberg: Workshop Season 4 Finale

    The 2019 HTTP Workshop ended today. In total over the years, we have now done 12 workshop days up to now. This day was not a full day and we spent it on only two major topics that both triggered long discussions involving large parts of the room.

    [...]

    Mike Bishop did an excellent presentation of HTTP/3 for HTTP people that possibly haven’t kept up fully with the developments in the QUIC working group. From a plain HTTP view, HTTP/3 is very similar feature-wise to HTTP/2 but of course sent over a completely different transport layer. (The HTTP/3 draft.)

    Most of the questions and discussions that followed were rather related to the transport, to QUIC. Its encryption, it being UDP, DOS prevention, it being “CPU hungry” etc. Deploying HTTP/3 might be a challenge for successful client side implementation, but that’s just nothing compared the totally new thing that will be necessary server-side. Web developers should largely not even have to care…

    One tidbit that was mentioned is that in current Firefox telemetry, it shows about 0.84% of all requests negotiates TLS 1.3 early data (with about 12.9% using TLS 1.3)

    Thought-worthy quote of the day comes from Willy: “everything is a buffer”

  • Daniel Stenberg: The HTTP Workshop 2019 begins

    35 persons from all over the world walked in the room and sat down around the O-shaped table setup. Lots of known faces and representatives from a large variety of HTTP implementations, client-side or server-side – but happily enough also a few new friends that attend their first HTTP Workshop here. The companies with the most employees present in the room include Apple, Facebook, Mozilla, Fastly, Cloudflare and Google – all with three each I believe.

    Patrick Mcmanus started off the morning with his presentation on HTTP conventional wisdoms trying to identify what have turned out as successes or not in HTTP land in recent times. It triggered a few discussions on the specific points and how to judge them. I believe the general consensus ended up mostly agreeing with the slides. The topic of unshipping HTTP/0.9 support came up but is said to not be possible due to its existing use. As a bonus, Anne van Kesteren posted a new bug on Firefox to remove it.

  • foss-north 2019 – it is happening

    This years experiments are the training day, and community day. Looking at the various RSVPs for the community day, it looks like we’ll be 130+ attendees. For the conference days we have only ten tickets left out of 240, beating last years record attendance with 90 people.

  • The Openness Continues: SUSECON Day 2 Recap

    Michael Miller then took the stage, provided an overview of the day and then welcomed Dr. Thomas Di Giacomo, President of Engineering, Product and Innovation to the stage.  But before diving into this discussion for the day, Thomas introduced a new SUSE video instructing everyone on the proper way to say “SUSE”.

SUSE Linux and enterprise Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

Raspberry Pi single-board computers are wildly popular with makers, kids, and anyone who likes hands-on computing. But, in enterprise business? Industrial sites? Not so much. Or, are they? At SUSECon in Nashville, Tenn., SUSE executives revealed that three customers are already deploying SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) on Raspberry Pi computers.

To be precise, these companies are all using Raspberry Pi Compute Modules. This is a Raspberry Pi 3 in a form factor that's designed for industrial applications,

The first customer, Knorr-Bremse, is a German manufacturing company. This business has old equipment with no built-in monitoring. It's using a SLES-powered Raspberry Pi device to track what its gear is doing. Not bad for a 1.2GHz ARM BCM2837 processor with a 1GB RAM and 4GB eMMC Flash device instead of an SD card.

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SUSE Server News

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SUSE
  • SUSE: More than Linux

    To the strains of My Kind of Open Source, SUSE wants you to know not just a Linux distributor. While SUSE will never leave its Linux roots, it offers a wide variety of open-source based programs and services for your servers, software-defined data center, the edge and cloud computing.

    At the SUSECon keynote in Nashville, Tenn., SUSE CEO Nils Brauckmann emphasised SUSE would soon be the largest independent open-source company. He's saying that because, as IDC open source analyst Al Gillen noted, IBM will soon complete its acquisition of Red Hat.

  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud 9 – coming soon!

    Here at SUSE, we’re very excited to let you know that the latest version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud is due to be released later this month. In fact, you might say that we’re on cloud 9.

  • SUSE Collaborates with Intel to Accelerate Data-Centric Transformation

Servers: SUSE and Kubernetes

Filed under
Server
SUSE
  • SUSE Will Soon Be the Largest Independent Linux Company
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm 15 on AWS

    SUSE is excited to launch SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm on AWS, backed by a Trial Subscription Program and also available via AWS Spot Instances to get started on your next innovation. Today’s innovators are testing new architecture designs to build products in increasingly more efficient, cost-effective, scalable, and secure ways. The Arm architecture is critical in this diverse ecosystem and its’ adoption by Amazon Web Services in November 2018 was a huge milestone for the market. While Arm is prevalent in the mobile market and the chip most likely powering the device in your pocket – the technology is also critical in powering IoT devices and applications in the machine learning space.

  • What Is Kubernetes?

    Kubernetes (pronounced “CUBE-A-NET-IS”) is an open-source platform that helps manage container applications such as Docker. Whether you are looking to automate or scale these containers across multiple hosts, Kubernetes can speed up deployment. To do this it may use internal components such as Kubernetes API or third-party extensions which run on Kubernetes.

    This article will help you understand the basic concepts of Kubernetes and why it is causing such a seismic shift in the server market, with vendors as well as cloud providers, such as Azure and Google Cloud, offering Kubernetes services.

  • Kubernetes v1.14 delivers production-level support for Windows nodes and Windows containers [Ed: When Kubernetes is steered by GPL violators and proprietary software thugs from VMware and Microsoft]

    The first release of Kubernetes in 2019 brings a highly anticipated feature - production-level support for Windows workloads. Up until now Windows node support in Kubernetes has been in beta, allowing many users to experiment and see the value of Kubernetes for Windows containers. While in beta, developers in the Kubernetes community and Windows Server team worked together to improve the container runtime, build a continuous testing process, and complete features needed for a good user experience. Kubernetes now officially supports adding Windows nodes as worker nodes and scheduling Windows containers, enabling a vast ecosystem of Windows applications to leverage the power of our platform.

The new SUSE

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SUSE

In Nashville, Tenn., at SUSECon, European Linux power SUSE CEO Nils Brauckmann said his company would soon be the largest independent Linux company. That's because, of course, IBM is acquiring Red Hat. But, simultaneously, SUSE has continued to grow for seven-straight years.

Brauckmann said, "We believe that makes our status as a truly independent open source company more important than ever. Our genuinely open-source solutions, flexible business practices, lack of enforced vendor lock-in, and exceptional service are more critical to customer and partner organizations, and our independence coincides with our single-minded focus on delivering what is best for them."

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Servers: IBM, Red Hat and SUSE

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • Don't count out IBM virtualization on the Z platform
  • IBM-Red Hat merger timing, fairness in question

    Red Hat posted 2019 year-end financial results this week that exceeded analyst expectations, but the company said nothing about its pending $34 billion purchase by IBM as industry experts question the value to Linux users and whether the deal will actually close in the second half of this year.

    While major roadblocks to the IBM-Red Hat merger have yet to become public, its sheer size has some industry observers in speculation mode.

    "If this deal doesn't go through, it wouldn't be a problem for anyone except IBM," said Dana Gardner, principal analyst at Interarbor Solutions LLC in Gilford, N.H. "People are quite happy with an independent Red Hat overseeing the development of an important product like Linux along with a cloud software infrastructure stack."

    For the most part, IT pros weren't excited about the deal because of what IBM brings to Red Hat, but what Red Hat brings to IBM, Gardner said. This is reflected in the "staggering" $34 billion IBM paid for Red Hat, he added.

  • Going to SUSECON ’19? Get $5!

    Have you been coveting your very own SUSE chameleon? How about a pair of SUSE socks? Or maybe it’s a notebook that you want to take home? The options to turn your office green are endless. And to jumpstart your journey, the Support team wants to give you $5!

  • Six First Impressions of SUSE Cloud Application Platform

    While I’ve been developing for Kubernetes for a few years now, I am pretty new to both SUSE and Cloud Foundry. I’ve got to say that both have been great experiences! SUSE is a fantastic place to work and our Cloud Foundry distribution (SUSE Cloud Application Platform) makes my development life easier.

  • A Syllabus to SUSE CaaS Platform at SUSECON

    NASHVILLE, BABY!!! That’s right, I’m hitting my old college stomping grounds for SUSECON!!
    Returning to Nashville brings me memories of housing Ben and Jerry’s Stephen Colbert Americone Dream from the Piggly Wiggly after learning that Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce were traded away from the Celtics, finding the single Dunkin’ Donuts in Nashville and moving into the apartment building next to it, blasting Jay Z’s Reasonable Doubt out of my dorm room windows, and paying more attention to the girl who sat next to me in ECON 2 than my professor (Sorry, Dr. C…)

    Ah man. Those were the days…

    Anyway, SUSECON! I’m the PMM for SUSE CaaS Platform! That’s what I’m here to write about!

  • Is Kubernetes The Next Big Enterprise App Platform? That Depends On How Many Apps Can Run On It

Happy Birthday SAP Linux Lab!

Filed under
Server
SUSE

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the SAP Linux Lab, and Suse was there from the beginning. Here are some highlights of two decades of collaboration.
When the SAP Linux Lab was founded in 1999, many could not be convinced of its importance in the SAP realm.

The reason for that is simple. At the time, Unix and Windows were the dominant SAP IT infrastructures. However, SAP Linux Lab was only supposed to ensure that SAP solutions running on the open source operating system Linux would be optimally supported. Consequently, many people questioned why they would even need another operating system for SAP, especially an open source one.

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openSUSE Board Alumni Peter T. Linnell died on March 18th

Filed under
SUSE
Obits

Peter was widely known as founder of Scribus, the Libre Graphics Meeting and enthusiastic contributor to countless other Free Software projects. For openSUSE he took over responsibility as an active member of our package review team and has served as openSUSE Board member twice, from 2011-2012 and 2014-2016. Peter passed away a week ago after lengthy battle with cancer, he is survived by his wife Pauline and his daughter Stella. His obituary mentions ways to honor his life.

We will always remember Peter as fellow tinkerer, with an boundless passion to understand the inner workings and meanings of software and people. Farewell Peter, you’ll be missed by the openSUSE Community.

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Obituary: Peter T. Linnell

SUSE: More on SUSE Manager, "Independence" Media Blitz and SUSECON 2019

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SUSE
  • Managing Linux in the Cloud

    SUSE Manager extends the ideals of DevOps to the cloud environment, unlocking a world of rapid deployment and automation.

  • Where next for SUSE?

    Where next for SUSE? The company mentioned its independence no less than 12 times in a recent notice to the press. Flush with investor money, can the business finally steer its own ship to success?

  • SUSECON 2019: These Industry Kingpins Have Something to Say

    I really learned a lot at this event. The access to people who know their stuff is something I did not expect. They are really helpful!

    I loved it. It was interesting and fun. Very good to meet other people and exchange experiences.

SUSE: Future and Independence

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SUSE
  • The Future of SUSE: A Home for Truly Open Open Source Solutions

    While this might look like a big change for SUSE, the fact is that for myself and the rest of the leadership team here, it’s a fulfillment of a path we’ve been following for a long time.
    In fact, there are no changes to the essence of our mission, vision and strategy. We will continue our focus on the success of our customers and our commitments to our partners and open source communities and projects.
    Events and trends in IT make it clear that open source has become more important for enterprises than ever. We believe this makes our position as the largest independent open source company more important than ever. SUSE’s independence is aligned with a single-minded focus on delivering what is best for our customers and partners, coupled with full control over our own destiny.

  • SUSE Completes Move to Independence, Reaffirms Commitment to Customers, Partners and Open Source Communities as Industry’s Largest Independent Open Source Company

    SUSE® today announced the creation of the largest independent open source company following the completion of SUSE’s acquisition by growth investor EQT from Micro Focus. With its ongoing momentum, portfolio expansion and successful execution in the marketplace, as a standalone business SUSE is now even better positioned to focus on the needs of customers and partners as a leading provider of enterprise-grade, open source software-defined infrastructure and application delivery solutions that enable customer workloads anywhere – on premise, hybrid and multi-cloud – with exceptional service, value and flexibility.
    The newly independent SUSE has expanded its executive team, adding new leadership roles and experience to foster its continued momentum into this next stage of corporate development. Enrica Angelone has been named to the new post of chief financial officer, and Sander Huyts is SUSE’s new chief operations officer. Thomas Di Giacomo, formerly chief technology officer for SUSE, is now president of Engineering, Product and Innovation. All three report to SUSE CEO Nils Brauckmann.

  • SUSE completes its management transition

    Here's a SUSE press release hyping its transition to being "the largest independent open-source company".

  • SUSE Marks Its New Independence Under EQT Ownership

    It was in July of last year that Swedish private equity firm EQT Partners acquired SUSE from Micro Focus. That deal is now closed and SUSE is marking its independence today while proclaiming to be the largest independent open-source company.

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