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SUSE

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE

More on SUSE, Mirantis, Red Hat, and OpenStack

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Red Hat
Server
OSS
SUSE

openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux Users Get LibreOffice 5.2 and Wireshark 2.0.5, More

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SUSE

Today, August 10, 2016, openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio has informed the openSUSE Tumbleweed community about the new software versions that landed in the snapshots released last week.

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Mirantis, Red Hat, and SUSE

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • Mirantis Sidesteps Red Hat Resistance To Rival OpenStack Software Running On Its Dominant Linux, Red Hat Calls Foul

    For a pure-play OpenStack software vendor like Mirantis, not being able to deploy your cloud-building software on servers running the world's most-popular distribution of the Linux operating system terribly limits your addressable market.

    That's why Mirantis has been trying for years to strike a partnership with Red Hat, which was an early strategic investor in Mirantis. But the open-source software giant offers its own OpenStack distribution—and maintains that version is the only one precisely engineered for integration with its operating system.

    Mirantis' repeated attempts to reach an agreement to certify and support its product to run on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) have all fizzled.

  • Mirantis Partners with SUSE to Deliver Complete Enterprise Linux Support

    Mirantis, the pure-play OpenStack company, and SUSE®, a pioneer in Linux and open source solutions, today announced a joint collaboration to offer Mirantis OpenStack customers support for enterprise Linux. Both companies will collaborate technically to establish SUSE Linux Enterprise Server as a development platform for use with Mirantis OpenStack. The companies will also collaborate to support Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS, making Mirantis a one-stop shop for OpenStack support on the leading enterprise Linux distributions.

SUSE and Mirantis to Offer Full Enterprise Linux Support for SLES, RHEL & CentOS

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SUSE

Today, August 9, 2016, SUSE, the company behind the powerful SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop (SLED) and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) operating systems, announced that it partners with Mirantis, the pure-play OpenStack company, for providing full enterprise Linux support.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed GNU/Linux Operating System Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.7

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SUSE

A new openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot has been released on the day of August 4, 2016, bringing various updated packages among which we can mention the recently announced Linux 4.7 kernel.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Latest KDE Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7 Coming Soon

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SUSE

Today, July 27, 2016, openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio has informed the Tumbleweed community about the latest software updates that landed recently in the main software repositories of the rolling release operating system.

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SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Newest Tumbleweed snapshot updates KDE Applications

    The latest openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot has updated KDE Applications in the repositories to version 16.04.3.

    Snapshot 20160724 had a considerably large amount of package updates for Tumbleweed KDE users, but other updates in the snapshot included updates to kiwi-config-openSUSE, Libzypp to version 16.1.3, yast2-installation to version 3.1.202 and Kernel-firmware to 2016071

  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 22

    openSUSE Conference’16, Hackweek 14 and the various SUSE internal workshops are over. So it’s time for the YaST team to go back to usual three-weeks-long development sprints… and with new sprints come new public reports!

    With Leap 42.2 in Alpha phase and SLE12-SP2 in Beta phase our focus is on bugs fixing, so we don’t have as much fancy stuff to show in this report. Still, here you are some bits you could find interesting.

SUSE Leftovers

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SUSE
  • Machinery Team: Navigating your Linux system descriptions the pretty way

    Starting from version 1.21.0 you'll experience an improved graphical user interface, where show and compare views are connected. With this you can navigate between viewing different descriptions as well as comparing them, so working with multiple system descriptions is much faster and offers greater usability.

    When you start the graphical user interface you will get a list of all available system descriptions, where you can choose one to view more details. The following screen shot shows this list. You can use the search mask to filter them for certain terms. Simply click on the description you would like to see and it will get you to the details view. Run the command `machinery list --html` to get to the list view.

  • SUSE Studio enabled Microsoft Azure image type for SLES 12

    We are happy to announce that Azure image type has been enabled for SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 SP1 appliances. From now on you can build and upload SLE12 SP1 based appliances in the Microsoft Azure Cloud.

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Now Merged with SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2

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SUSE

The development cycle of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system continues, and today we would like to inform our readers about the availability of the third and last Alpha build in the series.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat's Survey in India

From Raspberry Pi to Supercomputers to the Cloud: The Linux Operating System

Linux is widely used in corporations now as the basis for everything from file servers to web servers to network security servers. The no-cost as well as commercial availability of distributions makes it an obvious choice in many scenarios. Distributions of Linux now power machines as small as the tiny Raspberry Pi to the largest supercomputers in the world. There is a wide variety of minimal and security hardened distributions, some of them designed for GPU workloads. Read more

IBM’s Systems With GNU/Linux

  • IBM Gives Power Systems Rebates For Linux Workloads
    Big Blue has made no secret whatsoever that it wants to ride the Linux wave up with the Power Systems platform, and its marketeers are doing what they can to sweeten the hardware deals as best they can without adversely affecting the top and bottom line at IBM in general and the Power Systems division in particular to help that Linux cause along.
  • Drilling Down Into IBM’s System Group
    The most obvious thing is that IBM’s revenues and profits continue to shrink, but the downside is getting smaller and smaller, and we think that IBM’s core systems business will start to level out this year and maybe even grow by the third or fourth quarter, depending on when Power9-based Power Systems and z14-based System z mainframes hit the market. In the final period of 2016, IBM’s overall revenues were $21.77 billion, down 1.1 percent from a year ago, and net income rose by nearly a point to $4.5 billion. This is sure a lot better than a year ago, when IBM’s revenues fell by 8.4 percent to $22 billion and its net income fell by 18.6 percent to $4.46 billion. For the full 2016 year, IBM’s revenues were off 2.1 percent to $79.85 billion, but its “real” systems business, which includes servers, storage, switching, systems software, databases, transaction monitors, and tech support and financing for its own iron, fell by 8.3 percent to $26.1 billion. (That’s our estimate; IBM does not break out sales this way, but we have some pretty good guesses on how it all breaks down.)

Security News

  • DB Ransom Attacks Spread to CouchDB and Hadoop [Ed: Get sysadmins who know what they are doing, as misconfigurations are expensive]
  • Security advisories for Monday
  • Return on Risk Investment
  • Widely used WebEx plugin for Chrome will execute attack code—patch now!
    The Chrome browser extension for Cisco Systems WebEx communications and collaboration service was just updated to fix a vulnerability that leaves all 20 million users susceptible to drive-by attacks that can be carried out by just about any website they visit.
  • DDoS attacks larger, more frequent and complex says Arbor
    Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks are becoming more frequent and complex, forcing businesses to deploy purpose-built DDoS protection solutions, according to a new infrastructure security report which warns that the threat landscape has been transformed by the emergence of Internet of Things (IoT) botnets. The annual worldwide infrastructure security report from Arbor Networks - the security division of NETSCOUT - reveals that the largest distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack reported in 2016 was 800 Gbps, a 60% increase over 2015’s largest attack of 500 Gbps.