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4 Truths From Inside Open Source Marketing at SUSE

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Being in marketing within a company focused on, and dedicated to, Open Source (and Free) software is an interesting thing; Open Source projects are not often associated with being particularly great at marketing and communication. The focus tends to be on the software being developed, with a mindset to let the quality of the software speak for itself. That doesn’t negate the need for great communication and marketing, though. (Even truly amazing software won’t have a lot of users if nobody knows it exists.)

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets KDE Plasma 5.5.5, Python 3.5.1 to Arrive Very Soon

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It looks like the new workers Tumbleweed received from SUSE are doing a very good job, as the rolling release openSUSE variant gets more snapshots than ever, which include all the latest GNU/Linux technologies.

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Also: openSUSE Is Now Looking for a Host City for Its openSUSE.Asia Summit 2016 Event

SUSE Now Offers Non-Disruptive Upgrades for OpenStack

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SUSE has just made it a lot easier to upgrade the company’s OpenStack distribution, SUSE OpenStack Cloud 6 (SOC 6).

“If enterprise customers want to move to a new version of OpenStack they don’t have to replace and rebuild; they can now do a normal upgrade from an older version of OpenStack cloud to a newer version,” said SUSE CEO Nils Brauckmann. “What it means is that they can easily move with OpenStack innovation.”

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GNOME 3.20 to Hit the openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux Repositories by the End of March

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openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio informs users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system about the latest updates pushed to the main repositories via snapshot builds.

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SUSE Leftovers

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  • TOSprint or not to sprint?
  • Highlights of development sprint 15

    We know you have missed the usual summary from the YaST trenches. But don’t panic, here you got it! As usual, we will only cover some highlights, saving you from the gory details of the not so exciting regular bugfixing.

  • Of gases, Qt, and Wayland

    Ever since the launch of Argon and Krypton, the openSUSE community KDE team didn’t really stand still: a number of changes (and potentially nice additions) have been brewing this week. This post recapitulates the most important one.

  • Argon and Krypton

    A recent announcement from openSUSE listed new live media (iso files) for Argon and Krypton. Argon is based on Leap 42.1, while Krypton is based on Tumbleweed.

    The openSUSE team maintains development repositories, in addition to the standard repos for the distributions. The development repos are where they build new or updated versions of the software for testing prior to adding that software to the standard repos. Both Argon and Krypton include some of these development repos.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2016/8

    We’re back on a weekly report – after all, there were some snapshots now. But first, at this place, a big THANK YOU to SUSE for the new openQA worker machine. It’s a pleasure to watch it run through a full openQA run of a snapshot in just about three hours.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets KDE Applications 15.12.2, Mesa 11.1.2, Glibc Fix

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openSUSE Chairman Richard Brown informs us today about the fact that the new hardware sponsored by SUSE has been all set up, and it is now fully functional for producing more snapshots for the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling OS.

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RapidDisk / RapidCache 3.7 now available.

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Red Hat

RapidDisk is an advanced Linux RAM Disk which consists of a collection of modules and an administration tool. Features include: Dynamically allocate RAM as block device. Use them as stand alone disk drives or even map them as caching nodes to slower local disk drives.

Pushed earlier this morning:

  • Cleaned up kernel module code.

openSUSE offers choices for KDE Git builds

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Gravitational waves might be the cause of two new live image, spin off projects released today by members of the openSUSE community.

The release of Argon, which is a live installable image based on openSUSE Leap, and Krypton, which is a live installable image based on openSUSE Tumbleweed, offer packages built for KDE Git using stable and tested openSUSE technologies to track the latest development state of KDE software.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Is in Need of Workers, No New Snapshots Will Be Released

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Instead of reporting what has been included in the latest snapshots released a few days ago for the rolling openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system, Douglas DeMaio writes about the fact that there are not enough workers to get the automated testing of openQA running at maximum capacity.

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SUSE Leftovers

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  • openSUSE Conference returns to Nuremberg

    The openSUSE Conference will return to Nuremberg June 22 – 26 and have its conference at a cultural center in the heart of the Bavarian city.

    This year’s oSC will take place at the Z Bau, which was a former military barracks before being converted into a cultural center in 2014.

  • Sugar on openSUSE

    Built openSUSE Leap based Sugar test images on SUSE Studio, get it from here.

  • Tumbleweed waits for workers

    openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed goes through automated tests before a snapshot is released and heavily relies on openQA for the process of Tumbleweed to create regular snapshots.


    The automated testing of openQA is currently running with only two workers left instead of the usual 10. The remaining workers are largely overloaded and can’t cope with the workload to produce new snapshots.

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Android Leftovers

Security News

  • How your DVR was hijacked to help epic cyberattack
    Technology experts warned for years that the millions of Internet-connected "smart" devices we use every day are weak, easily hijacked and could be turned against us. The massive siege on Dyn, a New Hampshire-based company that monitors and routes Internet traffic, shows those ominous predictions are now a reality. An unknown attacker intermittently knocked many popular websites offline for hours Friday, from Amazon to Twitter and Netflix to Etsy. How the breach occurred is a cautionary tale of the how the rush to make humdrum devices “smart” while sometimes leaving out crucial security can have major consequences.
  • Find Out If One of Your Devices Helped Break the Internet
    Security experts have been warning for years that the growing number of unsecured Internet of Things devices would bring a wave of unprecedented and catastrophic cyber attacks. Just last month, a hacker publicly released malware code used in a record-breaking attack that hijacked 1.5 million internet-connected security cameras, refrigerators, and other so-called “smart” devices that were using default usernames and passwords. On Friday, the shit finally hit the fan.
  • Once more, with passion: Fingerprints suck as passwords
    Fingerprints aren’t authentication. Fingerprints are identity. They are usernames. Fingerprints are something public, which is why it should really bother nobody with a sense of security that the FBI used them to unlock seized phones. You’re literally leaving your fingerprints on every object you touch. That makes for an abysmally awful authentication token.
  • Strengthen cyber-security with Linux
    Using open source software is a viable and proven method of combatting cyber-crime It’s encouraging to read that the government understands the seriousness of the loss of $81 million dollars via the hacking of Bangladesh Bank, and that a cyber-security agency is going to be formed to prevent further disasters. Currently, information security in each government department is up to the internal IT staff of that department.
  • Canonical announces live kernel patching for Ubuntu
    Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution, has announced that it will provide a live kernel patching services for version 16.04 which was released in April.
  • Everything you know about security is wrong
    If I asked everyone to tell me what security is, what do you do about it, and why you do it. I wouldn't get two answers that were the same. I probably wouldn't even get two that are similar. Why is this? After recording Episode 9 of the Open Source Security Podcast I co-host, I started thinking about measuring a lot. It came up in the podcast in the context of bug bounties, which get exactly what they measure. But do they measure the right things? I don't know the answer, nor does it really matter. It's just important to keep this in mind as in any system, you will get exactly what you measure. [...] If you have 2000 employees, 200 systems, 4 million lines of code, and 2 security people, that's clearly a disaster waiting to happen. If you have 20, there may be hope. I have no idea what the proper ratios should be, if you're willing to share ratios with me I'd love to start collecting data. As I said, I don't have scientific proof behind this, it's just something I suspect is true.
  • Home Automation: Coping with Insecurity in the IoT
    Reading Matthew Garret’s exposés of home automation IoT devices makes most engineers think “hell no!” or “over my dead body!”. However, there’s also the siren lure that the ability to program your home, or update its settings from anywhere in the world is phenomenally useful: for instance, the outside lights in my house used to depend on two timers (located about 50m from each other). They were old, loud (to the point the neighbours used to wonder what the buzzing was when they visited) and almost always wrongly set for turning the lights on at sunset. The final precipitating factor for me was the need to replace our thermostat, whose thermistor got so eccentric it started cooling in winter; so away went all the timers and their loud noises and in came a z-wave based home automation system, and the guilty pleasure of having an IoT based home automation system. Now the lights precisely and quietly turn on at sunset and off at 23:00 (adjusting themselves for daylight savings); the thermostat is accessible from my phone, meaning I can adjust it from wherever I happen to be (including Hong Kong airport when I realised I’d forgotten to set it to energy saving mode before we went on holiday). Finally, there’s waking up at 3am to realise your wife has fallen asleep over her book again and being able to turn off her reading light from your alarm clock without having to get out of bed … Automation bliss!

Microsoft Corruption, Rejections, and Struggles

  • Microsoft licensing corruption scandal in Romania has ended on October 3rd
    This scandal covers buying Microsoft licensees for Romanian administration from 2004 to 2012 for total 228 millions USD. During the investigation was found that more than 100 people, former ministers, mayor of Bucuresti and businessman are involved in this corruption scandal and more than 20 millions euro are paid as bribes.
  • 49ers Colin Kaepernick, Chip Kelly review Microsoft Surface tablets, which Bill Belichick is ‘done’ using
    Ranting about Microsoft’s unreliable, sideline tablets is not a top priority for 49ers coach Chip Kelly and quarterback Colin Kaepernick, not with a five-game losing streak in tow for Sunday’s game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. But both Kelly and Kaepernick confirmed this week that they’ve experienced problems with the Microsoft Surface tablets. They’re just not as fed up with them as New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick, who’s lambasted the imperfect technology for years and finally declared this week: “I’m done with the tablets.”
  • Windows: When no growth is an improvement
    Research firms like IDC and Gartner have continued to forecast contraction, not expansion, in the PC business. Only when enterprise migrations to Windows 10 kick into gear do analysts see a reversal of the industry’s historic slump. That isn’t expected to happen until next year.

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" & 8.15 "Nev" Receive Latest Debian Security Updates

After releasing the first Test build of the upcoming Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" operating system a couple of days ago, today, October 23, 2016, the Parsix GNU/Linux development team announced the availability of new security updates for all supported Parsix GNU/Linux releases. Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" is the current stable release of the Debian-based operating system, and it relies on the Debian Stable (Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie") software repositories. On the other hand Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" is the next major version, which right now is in development, but receives the same updates as the former. Read more