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YaST releases independent of openSUSE releases?

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Software
SUSE

opensuse.org: YaST is one of the cornerstones of openSUSE. There never was a release of YaST independent of openSUSE. Even the versioning of YaST is tied to openSUSE. But in principle, YaST is a tool that can be used across distributions.

openSUSE 11.1 Beta 4 Initial Impressions

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SUSE

dtschmitz.com: Even if I wasn't such an openSUSE devotee, I think I might find a lot of good things to say about this Linux product. Beta 4 is almost stable enough for production use.

openSUSE 11.1 countdown

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SUSE

dev-loki.blogspot: The openSUSE release countdown banners have been updated, with new languages (pt_BR, hu, id, bg, jp and wa) as well as counting down to 11.1. And as it is rendered on the server, it always points to the right number of remaining days before 11.1 release.

The new openSUSE community-elected board speaks

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SUSE

linux.com: The openSUSE project has a new board, and the new board has big plans. The distribution's first board was appointed by Novell in November 2007, tasked with the unusual job of "bootstrapping" a community-elected board that could guide the project with a balance of Novell and non-Novell influence.

Novell lays off employees in Europe

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SUSE

cnet.com: Novell laid off employees close to its SUSE home in Germany and Austria shutting sales offices in Vienna, Munich, and Berlin. The number of employees laid off has not yet been made public.

11 Prime Features of openSUSE 11.1 - A Comprehensive Review

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SUSE

blog.taragana: Open Suse is coming out with their new version of 11.1 and we are at it. openSUSE 11.1 beta 4 is just released, while the official launch of the final version is on 18 December, 2008. We took a detailed look into openSUSE 11.1 beta 4 and here are the gems we found.

openSUSE 11.1's New Partitioning Module

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SUSE

ostatic.com: openSUSE 11.1 is moving ever closer to its December release date. One of the changes long time openSUSE users will notice right away is the new YaST disk partitioner.

openSUSE 11.1 Beta 4 Now Available

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SUSE

opensuse.org: The openSUSE Project is happy to announce the availability of openSUSE 11.1 beta 4. This release includes a number of important bugfixes since the last beta, as well as a few new bugs that need to be squashed before the final release.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 44

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SUSE

Issue #44 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out! In this week’s issue: Less than 50 days to openSUSE 11.1, Results of the 1st openSUSE Board Election, and OpenOffice.org 3.0 final.

OpenSUSE Starts Steering its Own Course

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SUSE

linuxplanet.com: It's not easy for a Linux company to let go the reins of control over its community Linux distribution. Just ask Red Hat, which started to let go of Fedora and then decided to keep managing it (Red Hat keeps its grip on Fedora). But, now Novell is loosening its apron strings on its community Linux openSUSE.

Also: RealPlayer dropped from openSUSE, here’s why
And: Status update for openSUSE 11.1 beta 4

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