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Bright Computing Signs Agreement With Novell

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SUSE
  • Bright Computing Signs With Novell to Offer SLED With its Cluster
  • Microsoft, Novell say alliance still bearing fruit
  • Shiny new desktop: openSUSE 11.2 dual-headed goodness
  • Promoting Open Source Through Social Media

openSUSE Weekly News #96 is out!

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SUSE

Issue #96 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out!

Vote for the openSUSE DVD Cover

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SUSE

dissociatedpress.net: Typically Novell has created the artwork for the openSUSE DVDs, but this time around we had some really interesting and creative input from openSUSE contributors.

How to Build Your Own Custom Linux Distro

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SUSE

maximumpc.com: Although most Linux users rely on pre-built Linux distros and customize their software configuration after installation, there is nothing quite like having a Linux distro that was custom-designed to your specifications.

Jobs go at Novell

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SUSE

channelregister.co.uk: Novell is cutting jobs in various departments and in various countries. The Linux vendor, which has spent recent weeks cutting its UK distributors, will trim between 100 and 130 jobs from its total headcount of 3,900.

SUSE Studio: Point-and-Click Linux Appliances

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SUSE

thevarguy.com: It has been a few months since Novell launched the SUSE Appliance program. So we checked in with Novell to see how the effort was going so far.

OpenSUSE Weekly News #95 is out!

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SUSE

news.opensuse.org: Issue #95 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out!

Final openSUSE 11.2 Release Candidate Available

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SUSE

news.opensuse.org: This is it folks! We’re almost there for openSUSE 11.2. Time to grab the final 11.2 release candidate and shake out any remaining bugs to get the lizard ready for release. This release includes an updated kernel, Samba, Firefox, and more.

Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.2: KDE 4.3 Experience

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KDE
SUSE

opensuse.org: The KDE 4 experience in openSUSE has been enhanced daily, and while the desktop environment itself has matured significantly since the last release, there has been a constant focus to provide an outstanding delivery of it in openSUSE 11.2.

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More in Tux Machines

Development News

  • Dart-on-LLVM
    Dart already has an excellent virtual machine which uses just-in-time compilation to get excellent performance. Since Dart is dynamically typed (more precisely, it’s optionally typed), a JIT compiler is a natural fit — it can use the types available at runtime to perform optimizations that a static compiler can’t do.
  • Google Developers Experiment With Plumbing Dartlang Into LLVM
    It's been a while since last hearing much excitement around Google's Dart programming language that's an alternative to JavaScript. This ECMA-approved language is now being used with IoT devices, can still be source-to-source compiled for JavaScript, and the latest is that the Google developers have been experimenting with wiring it into LLVM.
  • A behind the scenes look at Exercism for improving coding skills
    In our recent article, we talked about Exercism, an open source project to help people level up in their programming skills with exercises for dozens of different programming languages. Practitioners complete each exercise and then receive feedback on their response, enabling them to learn from their peer group's experience. Katrina Owen is the founder of Exercism, and I interviewed her as research for the original article. There are some fantastic nuggets of information and insight in here that we wanted to share with anyone interested in learning to programming, teaching programming, and how a project like this takes contributions like this from others.
  • ‘You are Not Expected to Understand This’: An Explainer on Unix’s Most Notorious Code Comment
    The phrase “You are Not Expected to Understand This” is probably the most famous comment in the history of Unix. And last month, at the Systems We Love conference in San Francisco, systems researcher Arun Thomas explained to an audience exactly what it was that they weren’t supposed to understand.

Red Hat and Fedora

  • OpenStack Swift: Scalable and Durable Object Storage
  • OpenStack Swift by Christian Schwede, Red Hat
    In his LinuxCon Europe talk, Christian Schwede from Red Hat talked about how Swift is deployed at large enterprise companies with many of these deployments operating on a scale of multiple petabytes.
  • [Red Hat CEO] 5 resolutions to become a more open leader in 2017
    I'm always looking for ways to help people understand the power of open. And this year, I'm even more committed to showing others how a culture of openness can reinvigorate an organization and generate new opportunities for innovation, whether in the area of software development or beyond. Here are five resolutions we can all make if we want to become more open leaders in 2017.
  • ABR Of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) At 1.47
  • Fedora 26 Planning For A Modular Server Preview
    Fedora Linux has been pursuing a path of modularity whereby modules provide different software purpose/functionality and are integrated/tested at the module level and a unit of delivery itself. With the Fedora 26 release they are hoping to provide a Fedora Modular Server preview build.
  • Factory 2, Sprint 8 Report
    We are on track with respect to three of the four priorities: module build infrastructure will be ready before the F26 Alpha freeze. Our VMs are provisioned, we're working through the packaging rituals, and we'll be ready for an initial deployment shortly after devconf. Internally, our MvP of resultsdb and resultsdb-updater are working and pulling data from some early-adopter Platform Jenkins masters and our internal performance measurement work is bearing fruit slowly but steadily: we have two key metrics updating automatically on our kibana dashboard, with two more in progress to be completed in the coming sprints.

Security Leftovers

  • Truffle Hog Finds Security Keys Hidden in GitHub Code
    According to commentors on a Reddit thread about Truffle Hog, Amazon Web Services has already been using a similar tool for the same purpose. "I have accidentally committed my AWS secret keys before to a public repo," user KingOtar wrote. "Amazon actually found them and shut down my account until I created new ones. Kinda neat Amazon."
  • 5 Essential Tips for Securing Your WordPress Sites
    WordPress is by far the most popular blogging platform today. Being as popular as it is, it comes with its own strengths and weaknesses. The very fact that almost everybody uses it, makes it more prone to vulnerabilities. WordPress developers are doing a great job of fixing and patching the framework as new flaws are discovered, but that doesn’t mean that you can simply install and forget your installation. In this post, we will provide some of the most common ways of securing and strengthening a WordPress site.
  • Google ventures into public key encryption
    Google announced an early prototype of Key Transparency, its latest open source effort to ensure simpler, safer, and secure communications for everyone. The project’s goal is to make it easier for applications services to share and discover public keys for users, but it will be a while before it's ready for prime time. Secure communications should be de rigueur, but it remains frustratingly out of reach for most people, more than 20 years after the creation of Pretty Good Privacy (PGP). Existing methods where users need to manually find and verify the recipients’ keys are time-consuming and often complicated. Messaging apps and file sharing tools are limited in that users can communicate only within the service because there is no generic, secure method to look up public keys.
  • How to Keep Hackers out of Your Linux Machine Part 2: Three More Easy Security Tips
    In part 1 of this series, I shared two easy ways to prevent hackers from eating your Linux machine. Here are three more tips from my recent Linux Foundation webinar where I shared more tactics, tools and methods hackers use to invade your space. Watch the entire webinar on-demand for free.

Games for GNU/Linux