Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

SUSE

SUSE: Unified Patents, SC19 and Iguazio

Filed under
SUSE
  • SUSE welcomes cooperation of Open Invention Network, Linux Foundation, IBM and Microsoft in co-funding Unified Patent’s new Open Source Zone

    An eternal truth is that everything has its opposite for good and evil. Patents are no exception. In fact, even the simple word ‘Patent’ evokes much positive and negative emotion in today’s software world – particularly as news continues to circulate around baseless patent lawsuits by non-practicing entities (NPEs).
    But in news this week there is a bit of positive for a change. The positive news is the announcement of the efforts by Unified Patents to reduce NPE assertion of invalid patents in the open source software zone.

  • SC19: Empowering SUSE HPC customers with expanded options

    SC19, the International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis is just around the corner. For SUSE, it’s a great opportunity to reconnect with customers and partners working in one of the sectors of our industry driving significant innovation in all aspects of computing.

    If I tried to succinctly define SUSE’s message at SC19, it would be: “As with any journey, who you travel with is more important than the destination”. In SUSE’s instance, customers and partners make up our travel companions. In this journey, the customer is in the driver’s seat and elects the destination. Our role at SUSE is to empower HPC customers with choice across processor and GPU platforms as well as delivery options (on-premise, cloud, or hybrid).

  • SUSE and Iguazio Break the Mold by Providing an Open Source Solution for Enterprise Data Science Teams

    The notions of collaborative innovation, openness and portability are driving enterprises to embrace open source technologies. Anyone can download and install Kubernetes, Jupyter, Spark, TensorFlow and Pytorch to run machine learning applications, but making these applications enterprise grade is a whole different story. Delivering enterprise grade applications involves scalability, high-performance, tuning, monitoring, security and automation of infrastructure tasks. It can take months and typically requires a large team of developers, data scientists and data engineers.

SUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • Virtualization Management with SUSE Manager

    SUSE® Manager 4 is a best-in-class open source infrastructure management solution that lowers costs, enhances availability and reduces complexity for life-cycle management of Linux systems in large, complex and dynamic IT landscapes. You can use SUSE Manager to configure, deploy and administer thousands of Linux systems running on hypervisors, as containers, on bare metal systems, IoT devices and third-party cloud platforms. SUSE Manager also allows you to manage virtual machines (VMs).

    Virtualization is the means by which IT administrators create virtual resources, such as hardware platforms, storage devices, network resources and more. There are quite a few tools that enable the creation of virtual resources (such as Xen and KVM), but what about the management of those tools? That’s where SUSE Manager comes in.

  • Private and Air-Gap registry for openSUSE Kubic

    Sometimes there are occasions where direct internet access is not possible (proxy/offline/airgapped). Even in this setups it is possible to deploy and use Kubernetes with openSUSE Kubic and a local private registry.

    In this blog I will explain how to setup a local server which acts as private registry providing all the container images needed to deploy Kubernetes with openSUSE Kubic.

  • Join SUSE in Booth #4011 at AWS re:Invent, Las Vegas, December 2-6th!

Red Hat and SUSE Servers: Boston Children’s Hospital, IBM and SUSE in High-Performance Computing (HPC)

Filed under
Red Hat
SUSE
  • How Boston Children’s Hospital Augments Doctors Cognition with Red Hat OpenShift

    Software can be an enabler for healers. At Red Hat, we’ve seen this first hand from customers like Boston Children’s Hospital. That venerable infirmary is using Red Hat OpenShift and Linux containers to enhance their medical capabilities, and to augment their doctors cognitive capacity.

  • Entry Server Bang For The Buck, IBM i Versus Red Hat Linux

    In last week’s issue, we did a competitive analysis of the entry, single-socket Power S914 machines running IBM i against Dell PowerEdge servers using various Intel Xeon processors as well as an AMD Epyc chip running a Windows Server and SQL Server stack from Microsoft. This week, and particularly in the wake of IBM’s recent acquisition of Red Hat, we are looking at how entry IBM i platforms rate in terms of cost and performance against X86 machines running a Linux stack and an appropriate open source relational database that has enterprise support.

    Just as a recap from last week’s story, the IBM i matchup against Windows Server systems were encouraging in that very small configurations of the Power Systems machine running IBM i were less expensive per unit of online transaction processing performance as well as per user. However, on slightly larger configurations of single socket machines, thanks mostly to the very high cost per core of the IBM i operating system and its integrated middleware and database as you move from the P05 to P10 software tiers on the Power S914, the capital outlay can get very large at list price for the Power iron, and the software gets very pricey, too. The only thing that keeps the IBM i platform in the running is the substantially higher performance per core that the Power9 chip offers on machines with four, six, or eight cores.

    Such processors are fairly modest by 2019 standards, by the way, when a high-end chip has 24, 28, 32, or now 64 cores, and even mainstream ones have 12, 16, or 18 cores. If you want to see the rationale of the hardware configurations that we ginned up for the comparisons, we suggest that you review the story from last week. Suffice it to say, we tried to get machines with roughly the same core counts and configuration across the Power and X86 machines, and generally, the X86 cores for these classes of single socket servers do a lot less work.

  • Rise of the Chameleon – SUSE at SC19

    The impact of High-Performance Computing (HPC) goes beyond traditional research boundaries to enhance our daily lives.  SC19 is the international conference for High Performance Computing, networking, storage and analysis taking place in Denver November 17-22.  SUSE will once again have a strong presence at SC19 – and if you are attending we would love to talk to you!  Our SUSE booth (#1917) will include our popular Partner Theater as well as a VR light saber game with a Star Wars themed backdrop.  We will showcase SUSE’s HPC core solutions (OS, tools and Services) as well as AI/ML, Storage and Cloud open source products.  Plus, during the gala opening reception we will premier our new mini-movie “Sam the IT Manager in The Way of the Chameleon: The Quest for HPC” which you don’t want to miss (we’ll provide the popcorn)!

SUSE Continues Working On Linux Core Scheduling For Better Security

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

SUSE and other companies like DigitalOcean have been working on Linux core scheduling to make virtualization safer particularly in light of security vulnerabilities like L1TF and MDS. The core scheduling work is about ensuring different VMs don't share a HT sibling but rather only the same VM / trusted applications run on siblings of a core.

SUSE's Dario Faggioli presented at the KVM Forum 2019 at the end of October in Lyon, France. Dario's presentation covered the latest work on core-scheduling for virtualization.

Read more

Also: The Disappointing Direction Of Linux Performance From 4.16 To 5.4 Kernels

OpenSUSE Project Name Change Vote - Results

Filed under
SUSE
  • OpenSUSE Project Name Change Vote - Results
    Dear all,
    
    The vote has ended and the results have been released.
    
      Do we change the project name?
    
      Yes    42
      No    225
    
    Regards,
    
    Ish Sookun
    
  • openSUSE votes not to change its name

    The openSUSE project has been considering a name change as part of its move into a separate foundation since (at least) June. A long and somewhat controversial vote of project members has just come to an end, and the result is conclusive: 225-42 against the name change.

SUSE, Fedora and GNOME News/Developments

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME
SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/44

    While some folks are enjoying/celebrating Halloween, Tumbleweed stayed away from being scary. Even though there have been 5 snapshots (1024, 1025, 1027, 1028 & 1030) released this week, nothing there should scare you – at all: simply upgrade to the latest snapshot, as you always do.

  • Fedora 30 : GIMP 2.10.14 with flatpak.

    Flatpak is a software utility for software deployment and package management for Linux. It is advertised as offering a sandbox environment in which users can run application software in isolation from the rest of the system. see Wikipedia .
    Flatpak builds available in i386, x86-64, ARM and AArch64.

  • FPgM report: 2019-44

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. Fedora 31 was released on Tuesday. Fedora 29 will reach end of life on 26 November.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Debarshi Ray: Toolbox — A fall 2019 update

    Fedora 31 ships with cgroups v2 by default. The major blocker for cgroups v2 adoption so far was the lack of support in the various container and virtualization tools, including the Podman stack. Since Toolbox containers are just OCI containers managed with Podman, we saw some action too.

    After updating the host operating system to Fedora 31, Toolbox will try to migrate your existing containers to work with cgroups v2. Sadly, this is a somewhat complicated move, and in theory it’s possible that the migration might break some containers depending on how they were configured. So far, as per our testing, it seems that containers created by Toolbox do get smoothly migrated, so hopefully you won’t notice.

    However, if things go wrong, barring a delicate surgery on the container requiring some pretty arcane knowledge, your only option might be to do a factory reset of your local Podman installation. As factory resets go, you will lose all your existing OCI containers and images on your local system. This is a sad outcome for those unfortunate enough to encounter it. However, if you do find yourself in this quagmire then take a look at the toolbox reset command.

    Note that you need to have podman-1.6.2 and toolbox-0.0.16 for the above to work.

  • GNOME's Mutter Adds XWayland Full-Screen Games Workaround

    Thanks to Red Hat's Hans de Goede there is another optimization to GNOME's Mutter around XWayland full-screen gaming. 

    The work by the prolific Red Hat desktop developer is for X11 games that rely upon XRandR to change the resolution while also using the NET_WM_STATE_FULLSCREEN window manager hint when going into full-screen mode. 

    [...]

    The Mutter change can be found here while the xorg-server/XWayland side change was merged in October and will be present in whenever the next X.Org Server release finally materializes.

SUSE: High Availability Cluster Services, Oracle Server Infrastructure and Carla Schroder Joins the Team

Filed under
SUSE
  • SUSE High Availability Cluster Services – How to stop, start or view the status

    This blog post aims to summarize the starting and stopping options available for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) High Availability (HA) cluster stack operations. I will offer brief answers to a few questions that have been commonly asked by our customers and partners.

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Now Available On Oracle Cloud Infrastructure

    SUSE makes available its enterprise Linux server distribution for use on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure.

  • How to Keep Customers Happy and Liking Us a Lot, part 1

    We’re all here for various reasons, such as paychecks, a love of great open source software, creativity, wanting to build cool products to help people, nice offices full of colleagues and treats…whatever our reasons, SUSE exists as a business to sell enterprise open source software. Or, perhaps more accurately, to build great open source software and sell first-rate services and support.
    It is very difficult to build a successful business on open source software. It’s like the restaurant business: there is no secret sauce, no magic, no lock-in. Restaurants use the same food and recipes that anyone can use. What they’re really selling is a good experience for the customer: good food, good service, pleasant atmosphere, convenience. Anyone can open a restaurant, just like anyone can launch a new open source software project, so there is a lot of competition. Restaurants have very high rates of failure. Just like restaurants, to succeed as a commercial open source business you have to be better: much, much better. You can’t rely on lock-in and scary restrictive contracts like the closed-source proprietary software companies do.

Tumbleweed Gets New OpenSSH Major Version

Filed under
Security
SUSE

Snapshot 20191027, brought an update to KDE Plasma 5.17.1. The bugfix update fixed the Mouse KCM acceleration profile on X11 on the Plasma Desktop and had a fix for KWIN with visibility of the Context Help button. Part of the update to Plasma 5.17.1 came in the 20191022 snapshot on the day of the release from the KDE Project. The kcalendarcore package was update to KDE Frameworks 5.63.0, which landed in last week’s snapshots. Quite a few YaST packages arrived in the snapshot as well; some of the those YaST packages adapted to new Keyboard handling. The other two packages updated in the snapshot were to the AV1 decoder dav1d 0.5.1, which fixed a build issue in ARM64 assembly if debug info was enabled, and desktop calculator, qalculate 3.5.0, which had a fix for steradian conversion that is related to the surface area of a sphere. The Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer is being fixed and doesn’t have a rating for the snapshot.

Seven packages arrived in the 20191025 snapshot and the openssh 8.1 was a major upgrade. The new major version added some new features like an experimental lightweight signature and verification ability. According to the changelog, “signatures may be made using regular ssh keys held on disk or stored in a ssh-agent and verified against an authorized_keys-like list of allowed keys. Signatures embed a namespace that prevents confusion and attacks between different usage domains (e.g. files vs email).” The VirtualBox hypervisor for x86 virtualization had a minor update to version 6.0.14; the maintenance release fixed potential issue in the networking with interrupt signalling for network adapters in UEFI guests. The Network Time Protocol package chrony 3.5 added support for hardware timestamping on interfaces with read-only timestamping configuration and Persistent Memory programming package pmdk 1.7 introduced two new Application Program Interface (APIs) in librpmem and libpmemobj.

Read more

Also: SUSE Brings Enterprise Linux to Oracle Cloud to Meet Growing Demand for Cloud-Based Business Deployments

SUSE/OpenSUSE: Work by Thomas Zimmermann and OpenSUSE Leap 15.0 EOL

Filed under
SUSE
  • ASpeed DRM Driver Ported To Atomic Mode-Setting

    The "AST" DRM/KMS display driver that can be used with the many servers supporting ASpeed display hardware now has work pending for atomic mode-setting.

    SUSE's Thomas Zimmermann sent out the set of nine patches that convert the existing AST KMS driver into supporting atomic mode-setting as well as universal planes.

  • openSUSE Leap 15.0 Reaches End of Life on November 30th 2019

    openSUSE Leap 15.0 reaches the end of life on November 30, 2019. openSUSE Leap 15.0 reaches the end of its support after 1.5 years of life.

    openSUSE Leap 15.0 is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15 resources, released May 25, 2018.

SUSE/OpenSUSE Leftovers

Filed under
SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/43

    This week it has been another three snapshots released upon the users. There were some updates, as usual, and a larger stack has been removed from Tumbleweed, after weeks of preparation. The three snapshots released were 1018, 1022 and 1023

  • Webinar: Boost Developer Productivity with SUSE Cloud Application Platform

    Last week, Troy Topnik and I presented a webinar on how to boost developer productivity with SUSE Cloud Application Platform — our modern application delivery platform that brings an advanced cloud native developer experience to Kubernetes and enables fast and efficient delivery of cloud native applications at scale. Developers can serve themselves and get apps to the cloud in minutes instead of weeks. SUSE Cloud Application platform eliminates manual IT configuration and helps accelerate innovation by getting applications to market faster. Streamlining application delivery opens a clear path to increased business agility, led by enterprise development, operations, and DevOps teams.

  • SUSE YES Certification Kit for SUSE Enterprise Storage 6 Now Available

    With the official release of SUSE Enterprise Storage 6, SUSE Partner Engineering would like to announce the availability of the latest SUSE Enterprise Storage (SES) Certification Kit version 1.2. The SESCK v1.2 has been updated and enhanced to provide certification support for SUSE® Enterprise Storage 6.

Syndicate content