Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Moz/FF

Mozilla: Firefox 63, TenFourFox FPR10, Servo Progress

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox 63 Released with Tab Switcher Changes, More Robust Web Extensions

    Firefox 63 is the first version of the web browser to run web extensions (previously known as add-ons) in their own processes on Linux systems. Firefox already runs “out-of-process extensions” in its Windows and Mac builds.

    Although largely a technical change it should lead to some tangible performance benefits, and help improve the overall security and stability of Firefox. Should an add-on crash or have a memory leak it can no longer take the rest of the browser (or its tabs) with it.

  • Cameron Kaiser: TenFourFox FPR10 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 10 final is now available (downloads, hashes, release notes). This version is live now. Other than outstanding security updates, in this version I also retracted the change (by flipping the pref) for unique data URL origins in issue 525 because of some reported add-on incompatibility. I'm looking at a way add-ons can get around this with their existing code for FPR11, but you're warned: many sites rely on this behaviour to reduce their cross-site scriping surface, and we will have to turn it back on sooner or later.

    The changes for FPR11 (December) and FPR12 will be smaller in scope mostly because of the holidays and my parallel work on the POWER9 JIT for Firefox on the Talos II. For the next couple FPRs I'm planning to do more ES6 work (mostly Symbol and whatever else I can shoehorn in) and to enable unique data URI origins, and possibly get requestIdleCallback into a releaseable state. Despite the slower pace, however, we will still be tracking the Firefox release schedule as usual.

  • RGSoC wrap-up - Supporting Responsive Images in Servo

    Hey everyone, this is Nupur Baghel and Paavini Nanda, from the team “101 Days of Summer”. Both of us are computer engineering undergraduate students from New Delhi, India. We were involved with Servo this summer under the Rails Girls Summer of Code program and spent an amazing 3 months implementing functionalities to support responsive images in Servo <3

  • This Week In Servo 116

    In the past weeks, we merged 61 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.

Mozilla: WebAssembly, WebExtensions, Firefox Starts Testing 3rd-Party VPN Service

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • WebAssembly’s post-MVP future: A cartoon skill tree

    People have a misconception about WebAssembly. They think that the WebAssembly that landed in browsers back in 2017—which we called the minimum viable product (or MVP) of WebAssembly—is the final version of WebAssembly.

    I can understand where that misconception comes from. The WebAssembly community group is really committed to backwards compatibility. This means that the WebAssembly that you create today will continue working on browsers into the future.

    But that doesn’t mean that WebAssembly is feature complete. In fact, that’s far from the case. There are many features that are coming to WebAssembly which will fundamentally alter what you can do with WebAssembly.

    I think of these future features kind of like the skill tree in a videogame. We’ve fully filled in the top few of these skills, but there is still this whole skill tree below that we need to fill-in to unlock all of the applications.

  • Firefox 63.0 Available With WebExtensions On Linux Now Run In Their Own Process

    Ahead of the expected official release announcement tomorrow, Firefox 63.0 is now available from the Mozilla servers.

    Firefox 63.0 is notable for Linux desktop users in that WebExtensions now run in their own processes. There are a number of other changes though that benefit exclusively macOS and Windows users.

  • Mozilla Firefox Starts Testing 3rd-Party VPN Service

    It seems like Mozilla is following the footsteps of Opera. A German website reports that Mozilla will start testing commercial VPN for a few users in the USA, starting from today.

    Unlike Opera that offers its own VPN service, Mozilla is partnering with Swiss VPN provider ProtonVPN to use their networking resources for a more, advanced level of security.

Mozilla: WebRender, Spoke, Encrypted SNI, Blender, Opus 1.3

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • WebRender newsletter #26

    Here comes the 26th issue of WebRender’s newsletter.

  • Getting serious about political ad transparency with Ad Analysis for Facebook

    Do you know who is trying to influence your vote online? The votes of your friends and neighbors? Would you even know how to find out? Despite all the talk of election security, the tech industry still falls short on political ad transparency. With the U.S. midterm elections mere weeks away, this is a big problem.

    We can’t solve this problem alone, but we can help by making it more visible and easier to understand. Today we are announcing the release of our experimental extension, Ad Analysis for Facebook, to give you greater transparency into the online advertisements, including political ads, you see on Facebook.

  • Introducing Spoke: Make your own custom 3D social scenes

    Today we’re thrilled to announce the beta release of Spoke: the easiest way to create your own custom social 3D scenes you can use with Hubs.

    Over the last year, our Social Mixed Reality team has been developing Hubs, a WebVR-based social experience that runs right in your browser. In Hubs, you can communicate naturally in VR or on your phone or PC by simply sharing a link.

    Along the way, we’ve added features that enable social presence, self-expression, and content sharing. We’ve also offered a variety of scenes to choose from, like a castle space, an atrium, and even a wide open space high in the sky.

  • Encrypted SNI Comes to Firefox Nightly

    Firefox Nightly now supports encrypting the TLS Server Name Indication (SNI) extension, which helps prevent attackers on your network from learning your browsing history. You can enable encrypted SNI today and it will automatically work with any site that supports it. Currently, that means any site hosted by Cloudflare, but we’re hoping other providers will add ESNI support soon.

  • If you build it (together), they will come…

    Mozilla and the Khronos Group collaborate to bring glTF capabilities to Blender

    Mozilla is committed to the next wave of creativity in the open Web, in which people can access, create and share immersive VR and AR experiences across platforms and devices. What it takes though is an enthusiastic, skilled and growing community of creators, artists, and also businesses forming a healthy ecosystem, as well as tool support for web developers who build content for it. To overcome a fragmented environment and to allow for broad adoption, we need the leading content format to be open, and frameworks and toolsets to be efficient and interoperable. Ensuring that tools for creation, modification and viewing are open to the entire community and that there aren’t gatekeepers to creativity is one of the main working areas for Mozilla’s Mixed Reality (WebXR) Team. Building on its “Open by Design” strategy Open Innovation partnered with that team around Lars Bergstrom to find neat, yet impactful ways to stimulate external collaboration, co-development and co-funding of technology.

  • Mozilla Productivity Tip: Managing try pushes

    I tend to do a lot of try pushes for testing changes to Gecko and other stuff, and by using one of TreeHerder's (apparently) lesser-known features, managing these pushes to see their results is really easy. If you have trouble managing your try pushes, consider this:

    Open a tab with an author filter for yourself. You can do this by clicking on your email address on any of your try pushes (see highlighted area in screenshot below). Keep this tab open, forever. By default it shows you the last 10 try pushes you did, and if you leave it open, it will auto-update to show newer try pushes that you do.

  • Opus 1.3 Released - One Of The Leading Lossy Open-Source Audio Codecs

    Opus 1.3 features improvements to allow using SILK with bitrates down to around 5kb/s, wideband encoding down to 9kb/s, improved Ambisonics support, better security hardening, a new speech/music detector, and more.

  • Introducing Opus 1.3

    The Opus Audio Codec gets another major update with the release of version 1.3 (demo).

    Opus is a totally open, royalty-free audio codec that can be used for all audio applications, from music streaming and storage to high-quality video-conferencing and VoIP. Six years after its standardization by the IETF, Opus is now included in all major browsers and mobile operating systems. It has been adopted for a wide range of applications, and is the default WebRTC codec.

Mozilla: Search, Decentralised Web and Rust

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Searchfox in Phabricator extension

    Being able to search code while reviewing can be really useful, but unfortunately it’s not so straightforward. Many people resort to loading the patch under review in an IDE in order to be able to search code.

    Being able to do it directly in the browser can make the workflow much smoother.

    To support this use case, I’ve built an extension for Phabricator that integrates Searchfox code search functionality directly in Phabricator differentials. This way reviewers can benefit from hovers, go-to-definition and find-references without having to resort to the IDE or without having to manually navigate to the code on searchfox.org or dxr.mozilla.org. Moreover, compared to searchfox.org or dxr.mozilla.org, the extension highlights both the pre-patch view and the post-patch view, so reviewers can see how pre-existing variables/functions are being used after the patch.

  • Searching Made Faster, the Latest Firefox Exploration

    earch is one of the most common activities that people do whenever they go online. At Mozilla, we are always looking for ways to streamline that experience to make it fast, easy and convenient for our users.

    Our Firefox browser provides a variety of options for people to search the things and information they seek when they’re on the web, so we want to make search even easier. For instance, there are two search boxes on every home or new tab page – one is what we call the “awesome bar” also known as the URL bar, and the other is the search box in the home/new tab pages.

    In the awesome bar, users can use a shortcut to their queries by simply entering a predefined keyword (like @google) and typing the actual search term they are seeking, whether it’s the nearest movie theater location and times for the latest blockbuster movie or finding a sushi restaurant close to their current location. These Search Keywords have been part of the browser experience for years, yet it’s not commonly known. Here’s a hint to enable it: Go to “Preferences,” then “Search” and check “ One-Click Search Engines”.

  • Dweb: Decentralised, Real-Time, Interoperable Communication with Matrix

    Matrix is an open standard for interoperable, decentralised, real-time communication over the Internet. It provides a standard HTTP API for publishing and subscribing to real-time data in specified channels, which means it can be used to power Instant Messaging, VoIP/WebRTC signalling, Internet of Things communication, and anything else that can be expressed as JSON and needs to be transmitted in real-time over HTTP. The most common use of Matrix today is as an Instant Messaging platform.

  • This Week in Rust 256

Mozilla Developments and Blurbs

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Going from New Laptop to Productive Mozillian

    My old laptop had so many great stickers on it I didn’t want to say goodbye. So I put off my hardware refresh cycle from the recommended 2 years to almost 3.

    To speak the truth it wasn’t only the stickers that made me wary of switching. I had a workflow that worked. The system wasn’t slow. It was only three years old.

    But then Windows started crashing on me during video calls. And my Firefox build times became long enough that I ported changes to my Linux desktop before building them. It was time to move on.

  • Show your support for Firefox with new badges

    Firefox is only as strong as its passionate users. Because we’re independent, people need to make a conscious choice to use a non-default browser on their system. We’re most successful when happy users tell others about an alternative worth trying.

  • At MozFest, Spend 7 Days Exploring Internet Health

    Workshops that teach you how to detect misinformation and mobile trackers. A series of art installations that turn online data into artwork. A panel about the unintended consequences of AI, featuring a former YouTube engineer and a former FBI agent. And a conversation with the inventor of the web.

    These are just a handful of the experiences at this year’s MozFest, Mozilla’s annual festival for, by, and about people who love the internet. From October 22-28 at the Royal Society of Arts (RSA) and Ravensbourne University in central London, more than 2,500 developers, designers, activists, and artists from dozens of countries will gather to explore privacy, security, openness, and inclusion online.

  • Using requestIdleCallback for long running computations

    One of the ways developers have tipically tried to keep a smooth web application, without interfering with the browser’s animation and response to input, is to use a Web Worker for long running computations. For example, in the Prism.js (a library for syntax highlighting) API there’s an async parameter to choose “Whether to use Web Workers to improve performance and avoid blocking the UI when highlighting very large chunks of code”.

  • These Weeks In Servo 115

    In the past three weeks, we merged 181 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.

    Our Windows nightlies have been broken for several months for a number of reasons, and we have now fixed all of the known breakage. If you’re a Windows user, give our latest builds a try! You can visit arbitrary URLs by pressing Ctr+L.

    The Android Components project added a component to use Servo in any Android app.

Mozilla: FirefoxOS, Quality Speakings and Mozilla's Take on Encryption in Australia

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • FirefoxOS, A keyboard and prediction: Story of my first contribution

    This was at IBM, New York where I was interning and working on the TJ Watson project. I returned back to my desk, turned on my dual monitors, started reading some blogs and engaging on Mozilla IRC (a new found and pretty short lived hobby). Just a few days before that, FirefoxOS was launched in India in the form of an Intex phone with a $35 price tag. It was making waves all around, because of its hefty price and poor performance . The OS struggle was showing up in the super low cost hardware. I was personally furious about some of the shortcomings, primarily the keyboard which at that time didn’t support prediction in any language other than English and also did not learn new words. Coincidentally, I came upon Dietrich Ayala in the FirefoxOS IRC channel, who at that time was a Platform Engineer at Mozilla. To my surprise he agreed with many of my complaints and asked me if I want to contribute my ideas. I very much wanted to, but then again, I had no idea how. The idea of contributing to the codebase of something like FirefoxOS terrified me. He suggested I first send a proposal and then proceed from there. With my busy work schedule at IBM, this discussion slipped my mind and did not fully boil in my head until I returned home from my internship.

  • Quality Speakings

    Unfortunately my suite of annoying verbal tics – um right um right um, which I continue to treat like Victor Borge’s phonetic punctuation – are on full display here, but I guess we’ll have to live with that. Here’s a talk I gave at the GTA Linux User Group on “The State Of Mozilla”, split into the main talk and the Q&A sections. I could probably have cut a quarter of that talk out by just managing those twitches better, but I guess that’s a project for 2019.

  • Encryption bill will cause 'significant risk' to Internet: Mozilla

    Any measure that permits a government to lay down specifications for the design of Internet systems would cause significant risk to the security, stability and trust of such systems, the Mozilla Foundation has said in a submission about Australia's proposed encryption bill.

Mozilla: Featured Extensions Advisory Board, Extended Mind, Firefox Deprecating TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1 Support, Google's Lies, Mozilla Reps

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Apply to Join the Featured Extensions Advisory Board

    Do you love extensions? Do you have a keen sense of what makes a great extension? Want to help users discover extensions that will improve how they experience the web? If so, please consider applying to join our Featured Extensions Community Board!

    Board members nominate and select new featured extensions each month to help millions of users find top-quality extensions to customize their Firefox browsers. Click here to learn more about the duties of the Featured Extension Advisory Board. The current board is currently wrapping up their six-month tour of duty and we are now assembling a new board of talented contributors for the months January – June, 2019.

    Extension developers, designers, advocates, and fans are all invited to apply to join the board. Priority will be given to applicants who have not served on the board before, followed by those from previous boards, and finally from the outgoing board.

  • Mozilla VR Blog: How XR Environments Shape User Behavior

    In previous research, The Extended Mind has documented how a 3D space automatically signals to people the rules of behavior. One of the key findings of that research is that when there is synchrony in the design of a space, it helps communicate behavioral norms to visitors. That means that when there is complementarity among content, affordances, and avatars, it helps people learn how to act. One example would be creating a gym environment (content), with weights (affordances), but only letting avatars dress in tuxedos and evening gowns. The contraction of people’s appearances could demotivate weight-lifting (the desired behavior).

    This article shares learnings from the Hubs by Mozilla user research on how the different locations that they visited impacted participant’s behavior. Briefly, the researchers observed five pairs of participants in multiple 3D environments and watched as they navigated new ways of interacting with one another. In this particular study, participants visited a medieval fantasy world, a meeting room, an atrium, and a rooftop bunker.

  • Removing Old Versions of TLS

    In March of 2020, Firefox will disable support for TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1.

    On the Internet, 20 years is an eternity. TLS 1.0 will be 20 years old in January 2019. In that time, TLS has protected billions – and probably trillions – of connections from eavesdropping and attack.

    In that time, we have collectively learned a lot about what it takes to design and build a security protocol.

    Though we are not aware of specific problems with TLS 1.0 that require immediate action, several aspects of the design are neither as strong or as robust as we would like given the nature of the Internet today. Most importantly, TLS 1.0 does not support modern cryptographic algorithms.

  • Wladimir Palant: So Google is now claiming: "no one (including Google) can access your data"

    A few days ago Google announced ensuring privacy for your Android data backups. The essence is that your lockscreen PIN/pattern/passcode is used to encrypt your data and nobody should be able to decrypt it without knowing that passcode. Hey, that’s including Google themselves! Sounds good? Past experience indicates that such claims should not always be taken at face value. And in fact, this story raises some red flags for me.

    The trouble is, whatever you use on your phone’s lockscreen is likely not very secure. It doesn’t have to be, because the phone will lock up after a bunch of failed attempts. So everybody goes with a passcode that is easy to type but probably not too hard to guess. Can you derive an encryption key from that passcode? Sure! Will this encryption be unbreakable? Most definitely not. With passwords being that simple, anybody getting their hands on encrypted data will be able to guess the password and decrypt the data within a very short time. That will even be the case for a well-chosen key derivation algorithm (and we don’t know yet which algorithm Google chose to use here).

  • Rabimba: Voting impartially for fun and profit a.k.a Mozilla Reps Council Voting

    I am part of a program called Mozilla Reps. Though I am involved as a volunteer contributor with Mozilla for quite some time now, I am relatively new to the Mozilla Reps program and hardly know anything about the program apart from my scope of work in it.
    Apparently, this is the Election time for voting the nominated candidates for the Council who will spearhead the program for the next session. Since I am new to the program reading about everyone's election campaign and hearing about what they will do for the program was not giving me any clear motivation to vote for anyone specific. Though this wasn't anything super important, I still thought since I have a bit of time in my hand why not do something interesting about it.

Brave and Firefox Latest

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • Brave Browser Team Up With Tor

     

    TOR [sic] or The Onion Router uses technology that separates your computer from the website you’re viewing by routing the network traffic through 3 seperate servers before it reaches your computer. That being said Brave Core Beta hasn’t been fully tested yet so “users should not rely on it for serious use just yet,” Brave said.

  •  

  • Your RSS is grass: Mozilla euthanizes feed reader, Atom code in Firefox browser, claims it's old and unloved

    When Firefox 64 arrives in December, support for RSS, the once celebrated content syndication scheme, and its sibling, Atom, will be missing.

    "After considering the maintenance, performance and security costs of the feed preview and subscription features in Firefox, we’ve concluded that it is no longer sustainable to keep feed support in the core of the product," said Gijs Kruitbosch, a software engineer who works on Firefox at Mozilla, in a blog post on Thursday.

    RSS – which stands for Rich Site Summary, RDF Site Summary, or Really Simple Syndication, as you see fit – is an XML-based format for publishing and subscribing to web content feeds. It dates back to 1999 and for a time was rather popular, but been disappearing from a variety of applications and services since then.

    Mozilla appears to have gotten the wrecking ball rolling in 2011 when it removed the RSS button from Firefox. The explanation then was the same as it is now: It's just not very popular.

  • Cameron Kaiser: It's baaaaa-aaack: TenFourFox Intel

    It's back! It's undead! It's ugly! It's possibly functional! It's totally unsupported! It's ... TenFourFox for Intel Macs!

    Years ago as readers of this blog will recall, Claudio Leite built TenFourFox 17.0.2 for Intel, which the update check-in server shows some determined users are still running to this day on 10.5 and even 10.4 despite various problems such as issue 209. However, he didn't have time to maintain it, and a newer version was never built, though a few people since then have made various attempts and submitted some patches.

    One of these attempts is now far enough along to the point where I'm permitted to announce its existence. Riccardo Mottola has done substantial work on getting TenFourFox to build and run again on old Intel Macs with a focus on 32-bit compatibility, and his patches have been silently lurking in the source code repository for some time. Along with Ken Cunningham's additional work, who now also has a MacPorts portfile so you can build it yourself (PowerPC support in the portfile is coming, though you can still use the official instructions, of course), enough functions in the new Intel build that it can be used for basic tasks.

Mozilla: Pocket, Rust and MDN Updates

Filed under
Development
Moz/FF
  • Pocket’s Updated Listening Feature Effectively Turns Web Pages into Podcasts

    The read-it-later service has been focused on convenience and entertainment since Mozilla acquired it last year. Previous updates to the app introduced sponsored and recommended content based on a user’s interest. The new “listen” feature mimics the button layout and usability of podcast and music apps, encouraging users to treat Pocket like a source of entertainment, rather than a glorified bookmark app.

  • Announcing Rust 1.29.2

    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.29.2. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.

  • Payments, accessibility, and dead macros: MDN Changelog for September 2018

    We’ve been thinking about the direction and growth of MDN. We’d like a more direct connection with developers, and to provide them with valuable features and benefits they need to be successful in their web projects. We’ve researched several promising ideas, and decided that direct payments would be the first experiment. Logged-in users and 1% of anonymous visitors see the banner that asks them to directly support MDN. See Ali Spivak’s and Kadir Topal’s post, A New Way to Support MDN, for more information.

Firefox ESR 60 Is Now Available on Ubuntu as a Snap, Here's How to Install It

Filed under
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Every six weeks, a new major Firefox release hits the streets, and it's soon available in the Ubuntu repositories, but thanks to Canonical's Snappy technologies, users now have access to the latest ESR versions of Firefox too, which are mostly intended for the company's enterprise partners who want long-term supported Firefox release.

"The ESR version of Firefox is aimed at corporations who want to have more control over the version of Firefox their employees have installed," said Canonical in a blog post. "Mozilla recommends that users stay on the Rapid Release version if they wish the newest product features offered by Firefox."

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Programming: Bugs, Mistakes, and Python

  • Living on the command line: Why mistakes are a good thing
  • Getting started with functional programming in Python using the toolz library
    In the second of a two-part series, we continue to explore how we can import ideas from functional programming methodology into Python to have the best of both worlds. In the previous post, we covered immutable data structures. Those allow us to write "pure" functions, or functions that have no side effects, merely accepting some arguments and returning a result while maintaining decent performance.
  • The code's crashed again, but why? Tell us your war stories of bugs found – and bugs fixed
    Even the best software goes wrong from time to time. So, what exactly happens when it throws a wobbly, especially when it's a key component in a production environment? Whether it's a total crash, a transaction failure, or the mangling of important data, there's going to be some kind of business impact. And the more the problem persists, the greater the level of pain, loss, and disruption. Everyone wants faults identified, diagnosed, and fixed ASAP. Identification is not normally a challenge – user complaints, curses, screams, and threats usually provide a pretty good clue. But before anyone can prioritize and schedule a fix, someone needs to diagnose the problem.

Lakka – Transform Your Old PC into a Retrogaming Console

Lakka is a free, lightweight, and open-source Linux distro that turns a small PC into a full-blown game console. It features a beautiful and user-friendly UI with eye candy colours and a PS4-like User Experience. You can install it on your SD card and easily set it up or run it LIVE. Its wide range of joypad support allows you to use PlayStation, XBox, and Nintendo game controllers. If you don’t have a PC to use Lakka on you can dedicated hardware at a cost as low as $30 thanks to its support for a variety of computers not excluding Raspberry Pi, Raspberry 2, HummingBoard, Banana Po, Odroid, CuBox-i, Cubietruck, and Cubieboard 2. Lakka is the official OS of RetroArch which takes care of its inputs and display, and it implements all game systems as a libretro core. This separation ensures that users are able to configure their setup once and have their changes effected across all game systems. Read more

VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 1

  • Announcement: VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 1 released
    Please do NOT use this VirtualBox Beta release on production machines! A VirtualBox Beta release should be considered a bleeding-edge release meant for early evaluation and testing purposes.
  • Oracle Pushes VirtualBox 6.0 Into Public Beta
    Oracle's Munich developers responsible for maintaining the VirtualBox virtualization software this morning announced the first public test release of the upcoming VirtualBox 6.0. While VirtualBox 6.0 is referred to as "a new major release", as of the beta one stage there are just a few features to note. With VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 1 there is support for exporting a virtual machine to the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure. The second listed feature at this stage for v6.0 are improvements to the graphical user-interface for this VM software.

Games: MMORPGs, Disappointment From One Hour One Life and Linux port of Total War: WARHAMMER II