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Moz/FF

Mozilla Firefox 64 Is Now Available for All Supported Ubuntu Linux Releases

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Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Mozilla Firefox 64.0 continues the "Quantum" series with new features and improvements, including better recommendations for US users by showing suggestions about new and relevant Firefox features, services, and extensions based on their browsing habbits, enhanced tab management by allowing you to more easily and quickly close, move, pin, or bookmark tabs.

This release also makes it easier to manage performance via a new "Task Manager" accessible from the about:performance page, allowing users to view which tabs consume more CPU time so you can close them to conserve power, adds link time optimization (Clang LTO) for Linux and Mac users, as well as a new toolbar context menu option to remove add-ons.

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Mozilla Firefox 64.0

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Moz/FF

Programming: Python, Mozilla and HowTos

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Development
Moz/FF

Tor Browser: An Ultimate Web Browser for Anonymous Web Browsing in Linux

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Moz/FF
OSS
Security
Web

Most of us give a considerable time of ours to Internet. The primary Application we require to perform our internet activity is a browser, a web browser to be more perfect. Over Internet most of our’s activity is logged to Server/Client machine which includes IP address, Geographical Location, search/activity trends and a whole lots of Information which can potentially be very harmful, if used intentionally the other way.

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Mozilla Firefox and Rust

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Moz/FF
  • A new browser for Magic Leap [Ed: Mozilla VR Blog's Andre Vrignaud published "A new browser for Magic Leap". Then it was removed. Prematurely and accidentally announced?]

    Today, we’re making available an early developer preview of a browser for the Magic Leap One device. This browser is built on top of our Servo engine technology and shows off high quality 2D graphics and font rendering through our WebRender web rendering library. And will soon add more features.

    While we only support basic 2D pages today and have not yet built the full Firefox Reality browser experience and published this into the Magic Leap store, we look forward to working alongside our partners and community to do that early in 2019! Please try out the builds, provide feedback, and get involved if you’re interested in the future of mixed reality on the web in a cutting-edge standalone headset. And for those looking at Magic Leap for the first time, we also have an article on how the work was done.

  • encoding_rs: a Web-Compatible Character Encoding Library in Rust

    encoding_rs is a high-decode-performance, low-legacy-encode-footprint and high-correctness implementation of the WHATWG Encoding Standard written in Rust. In Firefox 56, encoding_rs replaced uconv as the character encoding library used in Firefox. This wasn’t an addition of a component but an actual replacement: uconv was removed when encoding_rs landed. This writeup covers the motivation and design of encoding_rs, as well as some benchmark results.

    Additionally, encoding_rs contains a submodule called encoding_rs::mem that’s meant for efficient encoding-related operations on UTF-16, UTF-8, and Latin1 in-memory strings—i.e., the kind of strings that are used in Gecko C++ code. This module is discussed separately after describing encoding_rs proper.

    The C++ integration of encoding_rs is not covered here and is covered in another write-up instead.

  • wasm-bindgen — how does it work?!

    A month or so ago I gave a presentation on the inner workings of wasm-bindgen to the WebAssembly Community Group. A particular focus was the way that wasm-bindgen is forward-compatible with, and acts as a sort of polyfill for, the host bindings proposal. A lot of this material was originally supposed to appear in my SFHTML5 presentation, but time constraints forced me to cut it out.

    Unfortunately, the presentation was not recorded, but you can view the slide deck below, or open it in a new window. Navigate between slides with arrow keys or space bar.

  • More on RLS version numbering

    In a few days the 2018 edition is going to roll out, and that will include some new framing around Rust's tooling. We've got a core set of developer tools which are stable and ready for widespread use. We're going to have a blog post all about that, but for now I wanted to address the status of the RLS, since when I last blogged about a 1.0 pre-release there was a significant sentiment that it was not ready (and given the expectations that a lot of people have, we agree).

  • Using cargo-fuzz to Transfer Code Review of Simple Safe Code to Complex Code that Uses unsafe

    encoding_rs::mem is a Rust module for performing conversions between different in-RAM text representations that are relevant to Gecko. Specifically, it converts between potentially invalid UTF-16, Latin1 (in the sense that unsigned byte value equals the Unicode scalar value), potentially invalid UTF-8, and guaranteed-valid UTF-8, and provides some operations on buffers in these encodings, such as checking if a UTF-16 or UTF-8 buffer only has code points in the ASCII range or only has code points in the Latin1 range. (You can read more about encoding_rs::mem in a write-up about encoding_rs as a whole.)

  • How I Wrote a Modern C++ Library in Rust

    Since version 56, Firefox has had a new character encoding conversion library called encoding_rs. It is written in Rust and replaced the old C++ character encoding conversion library called uconv that dated from early 1999. Initially, all the callers of the character encoding conversion library were C++ code, so the new library, despite being written in Rust, needed to feel usable when used from C++ code. In fact, the library appears to C++ callers as a modern C++ library. Here are the patterns that I used to accomplish that.

  • Firefox & cookies corruption problem

    A strange problem befell one of my computers running Windows, with Firefox being the default browser, utilizing a profile that goes back a good decade or more. One blue Monday, I opened the browser, went to one of the sites I frequently visit and use, and noticed that I'd been logged out. Another site, same thing. It would appear all my login sessions were gone.

    Since I keep multiple backups of everything, I restored the Firefox cookies database - cookies.sqlite file into the Firefox profile, and I was back to normal. Several days later, the issue happened again. Intrigued, I started exploring this somewhat obscure and not-well-documented problem. I believe I know why, and I have a solution.

Debian and Mozilla Development Reports for Last Month

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Moz/FF
Debian

Mozilla: Security, Tor Browser and December’s Featured Extensions

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Moz/FF
  • Maximizing password manager attack surface: Learning from Kaspersky

    I looked at a number of password manager browser extensions already, and most of them have some obvious issues. Kaspersky Password Manager manages to stand out in the crowd however, the approach taken here is rather unique. You know how browser extensions are rather tough to exploit, with all that sandboxed JavaScript and restrictive default content security policy? Clearly, all that is meant for weaklings who don’t know how to write secure code, not the pros working at Kaspersky.

    Kaspersky developers don’t like JavaScript, so they hand over control to their beloved C++ code as soon as possible. No stupid sandboxing, code is running with the privileges of the logged in user. No memory safety, dealing with buffer overflows is up to the developers. How they managed to do it? Browser extensions have that escape hatch called native messaging which allows connecting to an executable running on the user’s system. And that executable is what contains most of the logic in case of the Kaspersky Password Manager, with the browser extension being merely a dumb shell.

  • The Patch that converts a Firefox to a Tor Browser

    Have you ever wondered was makes the Tor Browser the Tor Browser? That is, what patch you would have to apply to Firefox in order to end up with a Tor Browser.

  • Mozilla Addons Blog: December’s Featured Extensions

Firefox Reality update supports 360 videos and 7 additional languages

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Moz/FF

Firefox Reality 1.1 is now available for download in the Viveport, Oculus, and Daydream app stores. This release includes some major new features, including localization to seven new languages (including voice search support), a new dedicated theater viewing mode, bookmarks, 360 video support, and significant improvements to the performance and quality of our user interface.

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Mozilla: WebRender, Open Innovation, and New Site for Rust

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Moz/FF
  • Mozilla B-Team: happy bmo push day!
  • WebRender newsletter #32

    OMTP, for off-main-thread painting, is a project completely separate from WebRender that was implemented by Ryan. Without WebRender, painting used to happen on the main thread (the thread that runs the JS event loop). Since this thread is often the busiest, moving things out of it, for example painting, is a nice win for multi core processors since the main thread gets to go back to working on JS more quickly while painting is carried out in parallel. This work is pretty much done now and Ryan is working on project Fission.

    What about WebRender? WebRender moved all of painting off of the main thread by default. The main thread translates Gecko’s displaylist into a WebRender displaylist which is sent to the GPU process and the latter renders everything. So WebRender and OMTP, while independent projects both fulfill the goal of OMTP which was to remove work from the main thread. OMTP can be seen as a very nice performance win while waiting for WebRender.

  • Mozilla Open Innovation Team: Prototyping with Intention

    At the start of any project our Open Innovation team concepts with the intention that things will change. Whether it be wireframe prototypes or coded experiments, iteration is inevitable. First ideas are often far from perfect… it’s with help from new or returning contributors and collaborating project teams that we’re able to refine initial ideas more readily and efficiently. How? Through feedback loops designed with tools such as Discourse, GitHub, contact forms, on-site surveys and remote testing. Our overall goal being: Release assumptions early and learn from those engaging with the concept. In this way we set our experiences up for incremental, data influenced iteration.

  • A new look for rust-lang.org

    We want Mario to use Rust, the fireflower, and turn into the ever-awesome Fire Mario. But there’s a corollary here: it’s better to say “we will make you into Fire Mario” than it is “we sell fire flowers.”

Mozilla: Multilingual Gecko Status, Rust, Firefox 64 Beta 12 Testday Results

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Moz/FF
  • Multilingual Gecko Status Update 2018.2

    Welcome to the third edition of Multilingual Gecko Status Update!

    In the previous update we covered the work which landed in Firefox 59 and Firefox 60.

    At the time, we’ve been finalizing the platform work to support Fluent localization system, and we were in the middle of migration of the first Firefox UI component – Preferences – to it.

  • Thessaloniki GNOME+Rust Hackfest 2018

    A couple of weeks ago we had the fourth GNOME+Rust hackfest, this time in Thessaloniki, Greece. This is the beautiful city that will host next year's GUADEC, but fortunately GUADEC will be in summertime!

    We held the hackfest at the CoHo coworking space, a small, cozy office between the University and the sea.

    Every such hackfest I am overwhelmed by the kind hackers who work on [gnome-class], the code generator for GObject implementations in Rust.

  • Firefox 64 Beta 12 Testday Results

    As you may already know, last Friday November 23th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox 64 Beta 12.

    Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place: Gabriela, Kamila kamciatek, Amirtha V and Priyadharshini A.

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More in Tux Machines

Openwashing and FUD, Notably Microsoft

Linux Foundation: O-RAN, Hyperledger, Open Source Compliance and More

  • Verizon joins O-RAN Alliance board
    After announcing earlier this year that the xRAN Forum and C-RAN Alliance were merging, the O-RAN Alliance announced new board members—including Verizon—and a collaboration with the Linux Foundation on open source software. Verizon’s participation in the O-RAN Alliance isn’t a surprise given its work on Open RAN initiatives and its earlier involvement in the xRAN Forum—it was a contributor to the xRAN fronthaul specification that was released in April. That specification defines open interfaces between the remote radio unit/head (RRU/RRH) and the baseband unit (BBU) to simplify interoperability between suppliers. [...] O-RAN also said it has started collaboration arrangements with The Linux Foundation to establish an open source software community for the creation of open source RAN software. Collaboration with The Linux Foundation will enable the creation of open source software supporting the O-RAN architecture and interfaces.
  • O-RAN Alliance and Linux to create an open source software community
    The O-RAN Alliance announced that Reliance Jio, TIM, and Verizon have joined the O-RAN board. AT&T CTO Andre Fuetsch says, “It’s encouraging to see the O-RAN Alliance off to such a strong start and gaining momentum as we welcome three new board members. “It’s important that the wireless industry continues to come together to drive forward O-RAN’s goals for open networking, software, and virtualisation in global wireless networks especially as 5G is closer than ever.”
  • Hyperledger Onboards 12 New Members Including Alibaba Cloud, Deutsche Telekom and Citi
    Hyperledger has onboarded 12 new members, including such major firms as Alibaba Cloud, Citi, and Deutsche Telekom, according to an announcement published on Dec. 11. Launched in 2016, Hyperledger is an open source project created by the Linux Foundation and created to support the development of blockchain-based distributed ledgers. The new members were announced at the Hyperledger Global Forum in Basel, Switzerland. The latest general members that joined the initiative include Alibaba Cloud, a subsidiary of the e-commerce giant; financial services firm Citigroup, Deutsche Telekom, one of the largest telecoms providers in Europe; and European blockchain trading platform we.trade, among others.
  • Open Source Compliance in the Enterprise
    Open Source Compliance in the Enterprise, 2nd edition, by Ibrahim Haddad outlines best practices for organizations to adopt and use open source code in products and services, as well as participate in open source communities in a legal and responsible way.
  • Linux Foundation Brings the Year to a Close with 21 New Members Making the Commitment to Open Source
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced the addition of 18 Silver members and 3 Associate members. Linux Foundation members help support development of shared technology resources, while accelerating their own innovation through open source leadership and participation in some of the world’s most successful open source projects including Hyperledger, Kubernetes, Linux, Node.js and ONAP. Linux Foundation member contributions help provide the infrastructure and resources that enable the world’s largest open collaboration communities. Since the start of 2018, on average a new organization has joined The Linux Foundation every day.

Security: Linux.org and FUD

iCEBreaker, The Open Source Development Board for FPGAs

The Hackaday Superconference is over, which is a shame, but one of the great things about our conference is the people who manage to trek out to Pasadena every year to show us all the cool stuff they’re working on. One of those people was [Piotr Esden-Tempski], founder of 1 Bit Squared, and he brought some goodies that would soon be launched on a few crowdfunding platforms. The coolest of these was the iCEBreaker, an FPGA development kit that makes it easy to learn FPGAs with an Open Source toolchain. Read more