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Moz/FF

Mozilla Leftovers

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Moz/FF
  • These Weeks in Dev-Tools, issue 3

    These Weeks in Dev-Tools will keep you up to date with all the exciting dev tools news. We plan to have a new issue every few weeks. If you have any news you'd like us to report, please comment on the tracking issue.

  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 31
  • Understanding Extension Permission Requests

    An extension is software developed by a third party that modifies how you experience the web in Firefox. Since they work by tapping into the inner workings of Firefox, but are not built by Mozilla, it’s good practice to understand the permissions they ask for and how to make decisions about what to install. While rare, a malicious extension can do things like steal your data or track your browsing across the web without you realizing it.

    We have been taking steps to reduce the risk of extensions, the most significant of which was moving to a WebExtensions architecture with the release of Firefox 57 last fall. The new APIs limit an extension’s ability to access certain parts of the browser and the information they process. We also have a variety of security measures in place, such as a review process that is designed to make it difficult for malicious developers to publish extensions. Nevertheless, these systems cannot guarantee that extensions will be 100% safe.

  • Janitor project - Newsletter 10

    We hope you’ve had a smooth start into the year, and wish you all the best in your life and projects. This is your recurrent burst of good news about Janitor.

  • Switch from Chrome to Firefox in just a Few Minutes

    You’ve heard about how fast the new Firefox is. You’ve heard it’s made by people who want the web to be awesome for everyone. You like that, you’re curious to try, but you hesitate. Moving from Chrome to Firefox seems like work. Fussy, computer-y IT work. Ugh. ”What about all my “stuff”? I don’t want to set all this up again.”

Mozilla: Security, NASA, Brazil, Compatibility, Rust

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Moz/FF
  • Unsanitary Firefox gets fix for critical HTML-handling hijack flaw

    Mozilla has patched a nasty security bug in Firefox, affecting versions 56, 57 and 58, and their point updates.

    The CVSS-8.8-rated flaw means that if an attacker can get a user to open a malicious document or link, remote code execution becomes a possibility – allowing spyware, ransomware and other nasties to be installed and run.

  • Open by Design: How NASA Innovates to Take on the Universe, with Steven Rader

    As Mozilla rethinks how we do open, thinking strategically about how we work with contributors and others throughout the product lifecycle (and sharing some of our approaches, well, openly), we thought it would be good to take a look at how NASA engineers use open innovation as an valuable tool.

    On January 31, we'll hear from Steve Rader, the Deputy Manager for NASA's Center of Excellence for Collaborative Innovation (CoECI). We'll learn how a large, bureaucratic organization tasked with the wildest innovation goals became more nimble and innovative by identifying and effectively working with outside collaborators, and what lessons might apply to us as we innovate in the open at Mozilla.

  • Rep of the Month – January 2018

    Cynthia is digital communications strategist and front-end developer with expertise on technical consulting, user and staff training and customer service in IT and Telecom segments. She has been a part of the Mozilla community for a long time and and her work has made a big push into Mozilla’s mission through local community efforts.

  • MDN browser compatibility data: Taking the guesswork out of web compatibility

    The most powerful aspect of the web is also what makes it so challenging to build for: its universality. When you create a website, you’re writing code that needs to be understood by a plethora of browsers on different devices and operating systems. It’s difficult.

    To make the web evolve in a sane and sustainable way for both users and developers, browser vendors work together to standardize new features, whether it’s a new HTML element, CSS property, or JavaScript API. But different vendors have different priorities, resources, and release cycles — so it’s very unlikely that a new feature will land on all the major browsers at once. As a web developer, this is something you must consider if you’re relying on a feature to build your site.

  • In Rust, ordinary vectors are values

    I’ve been thinking a lot about persistent collections lately and in particular how they relate to Rust, and I wanted to write up some of my observations.

Mozilla: Rust, Privacy and More

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Moz/FF
  • Where’s Rust headed in 2018? Ask the community.

    2017 was a big year for the Rust systems programming language. Now, members of the open source project are looking to consolidate last year’s progress – making Rust easier to learn and use – and publish the first major update to the stable 2015 Rust release.

    “We’re making Rust a much nicer place to be,” said Aaron Turon, a Rust core team member and engineering manager at Mozilla. “We’re working to create a more productive environment for programmers – especially those new to the language.”

  • The 2018 Rust Event Lineup

    Every year there are multiple Rust events around the world, bringing together the community. Despite being early in the year, we’re excited to be able to highlight several events that are already being organized!

  • This Week in Rust 219

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

  • Retrospective: Looking Glass

    In December, we launched a tv show tie-in with Mr. Robot, Looking Glass, that alarmed some people because we didn’t think hard enough about the implications of shipping an add on that had the potential to be both confusing and upsetting. We’re deeply sorry for this and we understand why it’s important for us to learn and grow from this experience. As mentioned last month, we conducted a post-mortem to better understand how and why this happened and how we can do better.

  • Mozilla Reps Community: Rep of the Month – December 2017
  • Mozilla Security Blog: Preventing data leaks by stripping path information in HTTP Referrers

    To help prevent third party data leakage while browsing privately, Firefox Private Browsing Mode will remove path information from referrers sent to third parties starting in Firefox 59.

Mozilla: Internet Health, Progressive Web Apps and More

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Moz/FF
  • Mozilla’s Public Policy Impact on Internet Health

    Rest assured, in 2018, we will invest heavily in shaping public policy issues that contribute to and advance a healthy internet. We’ll continue our leadership on multi-year issues like privacy and security. We’ll keep fighting the critical ongoing battles like copyright reform and net neutrality. And we’re looking at emerging topics related to openness and decentralization, understanding and fighting back against the future of gatekeeper control of our internet. We also have incredible depth left to be explored on how we perceive and experience trust online, and who around the world really gets included and can take full advantages of the opportunities of the internet. Some of the policy issues we tackle will be major headlines, even more so in 2018 than they were in 2017 – issues like competition, artificial intelligence, and intermediary liability. And we will be there. Across the board, in 2018, we will engage in public policy wherever we can to promote a healthy, open, trusted internet.

  • Progressive Web Apps are here. What’s the big deal?

    The web is the largest software platform ever, a great equalizer that works on any device, anywhere. The more it can do, the better off we’ll be. That’s the thinking behind Progressive Web Apps (PWA), mobile-friendly websites that can almost everything native apps can do, and they’re coming to Firefox for Android.

  • January 2018 CA Communication

    Mozilla has sent a CA Communication to inform Certificate Authorities (CAs) who have root certificates included in Mozilla’s program about current events related to domain validation for SSL certificates and to remind them of a number of upcoming deadlines.

  • Everything you need to know about privacy may just be on Reality TV

    One of the most prevalent and frightening things that women have to deal with online is the threat of stalking and severe harassment. Having been frequent targets of abuse, online harassment and stalking for the better part of a decade, it is clear that over the past few years, the Kardashian-Jenner clan have become experts in privacy because they’ve been forced to— these women have learned the hard way that they need to be in control of information about their private lives.

  • FOSDEM, Rust, and Debugging

    I’ve recently switched groups at Mozilla to start working full-time on improving Rust debugging.

Mozilla: Firefox 59, Survey of Screen Sizes, Update About Moderators

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Moz/FF
  • Extensions in Firefox 59

    The development team behind the WebExtensions architecture is no exception, landing a slew of new API and improvements that can now be found in Firefox 59 (just released to the Beta channel).

  • Firefox 59 Beta 6 Testday, February 2nd

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, February 2nd, we are organizing Firefox 59 Beta 6 Testday.

  • How to make a chart of your users' window sizes

    In preparation for the MDN redesign I examined our analytics to get an idea of how wide our users’ browser windows were. I wanted window widths, not screen sizes and I thought a chart would tell a more compelling story than a table.

  • An Update about Moderators, Administrators, and our new team member

    Throughout the years, we have been extremely lucky to have an amazing array of great people joining us and contributing in many various ways. There has been some spam here and there, we’ve had some people getting very emotional and unhappy about various aspects of SUMO or Mozilla, but so far we have had relatively few cases that needed Administrator investigation.

    Obviously, all that luck does not mean that interpersonal conflicts on different levels do not happen right now or will not happen in the future. We acknowledge this fact and want to be prepared for such moments, as infrequent as they are. Staying a step ahead of potential problems will help us provide you with a SUMO community experience you all can enjoy and be a part of.

Browsers: Firefox on Amazon, Firefox 59, and New Chrome

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Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Get Firefox on your Amazon Fire TV, now with Turbo Mode

    Amazon Fire TV users! Here at Mozilla, we believe you should have the ability to watch what you want or view the web how you want. Firefox for Fire TV, our browser for discovering and watching web video on TV, is here on Amazon Fire TV and Fire TV stick. You can launch popular video websites, like YouTube or Vimeo, load any website address and search the web for videos to play full screen on your TV, all from the comfort of your couch.

  • Firefox 59 Might Ship With Working Wayland Support

    Besides Firefox 59 being the release doing away with GTK2 support, this next Mozilla web-browser release might be the one to achieve working native Wayland support.

    For seven years there has been Bug 635134 for tracking a Firefox Wayland port so the web-browser would play nicely on this next-gen alternative to the X.Org Server.

  • Google Chrome 64 Rolls Out to Desktops with Meltdown and Spectre Patches

    Google has promoted its Chrome 64 web browser to the stable channel today for Linux, Mac, and Windows platforms, finally bringing the patches for the Meltdown and Spectre timing attacks.

    Chrome 64 has been in beta phase for the past six weeks, though it's been in development since the end of October 2017. It's the first release of the web browser to ship with security fixes to address the Meltdown and Spectre timing attacks. Google has detailed these patches earlier this month.

  • Google Chrome 64 is rolling out to Windows, Mac and Linux

    Google has started to roll out the latest version of its browser, Chrome 64, to Windows, Mac and Linux devices. The update will arrive to users throughout the next few days or weeks and comes with some handy features and important mitigation related to the Meltdown and Spectre CPU vulnerabilities.

  • Chrome 64 rolling out to Mac, Windows, Linux w/ CPU mitigations, improved pop-up blocker, sitewide audio muting
  • Chrome 64, GCC 7.3, Librem 5 Phone Progress and More

    Chrome 64 is now available for Linux, Mac and Windows, featuring a stronger ad blocker and several security fixes, including mitigations for Spectre and Meltdown. See the release updates for more info.

  • Google: Chrome 64 is out now, giving you tougher pop-up blocker, Spectre fixes

    Google has released Chrome 64 for Windows, Mac, and Linux, bringing a stronger pop-up blocker, over 50 security fixes, and more mitigations for the Spectre attack.

    As Google promised last year, Chrome 64 introduces a stronger pop-up block to protect against sneaky tactics that lead users to unwanted content through redirects.

    The abusive experiences that the blocker targets are practices often used by shadier sections of the web, including ads or parts of a page that create bogus site warnings and error messages, 'close' buttons that that do something other than close a page element, and play buttons that open third-party sites offering to download an app.

Mozilla: "Quantum", Pocket, Thunderbird Hire

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Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Firefox 58 "Quantum" Web Browser Is Now Available for Ubuntu Linux Users

    Canonical announced today that the recently released Mozilla Firefox 58.0 web browser is now available for download from the software repositories of all supported Ubuntu Linux releases.

    Mozilla officially launched the Firefox 58.0 "Quantum" web browser the other day, on January 23, 2018, bringing numerous improvements and new features like a two-tiered compiler and streaming compilation support to make WebAssembly even faster, WebVR support for Mac OS X users, and support for credit card info in the autofill feature.

  • Update on Pocket and Firefox Integration

    When Mozilla and Pocket joined forces less than a year ago, we said that together we will work to provide people everywhere with the tools to discover and access high-quality web content across platforms and silos, for a safer, empowered, independent online experience.

  • Rolling up our sleeves

    Yet, as I said in my last post, I don’t think all is lost for the open internet, as headlines the headlines might suggest. The internet remains a place of joy, opportunity and empowerment for many. I want to make sure it stays that way — that we don’t end up with a divide between slow, ad-laden, compromised internet for most people, and fast, private, secure internet for those who can pay for it.

  • We’re Hiring a Developer to Work on Thunderbird Full-Time!

    The Thunderbird Project is hiring for a software engineer! We’re looking for an amazing developer to come on board to help make Thunderbird the best Email client on the planet! If you are interested you can apply via the link below, following the job description.

Mozilla and OSS Leftovers

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Moz/FF
OSS
  • MOSS Q4 2017 Update

    We’ve just published MOSS’s Q4 2017 update, bringing you up to speed on what’s going on in the world of MOSS (Mozilla Open Source Support, our program for giving back to the open source and free software community).

  • Mozilla Communities Speaker Series #2 #PrivacyMonth
  • Mozilla Fixes 32 Security Flaws, Accelerates Performance in Firefox 58

    Mozilla released its first web browser update for 2018 on Jan. 23 with the debut of Firefox 58. The new release includes features designed to accelerate performance as well as patches for 32 security vulnerabilities.

    Firefox 58 is the second major release in the Quantum series, which became generally available in November 2017 with Firefox 57. A core element of the Firefox Quantum browser series is performance, and that has been improved even more in Firefox 58, thanks to a capability called Off-Main-Thread-Painting (OMTP).

  • Plex VR, Firefox 58.0, SteamOS and More

    Firefox 58.0 was released yesterday, and Project Quantum continues to deliver performance gains. Read the release notes for more information on all the improvements.

  • Data Center Network Software Startup Cumulus Raises $43M

    Says it will use the money to expand outside the US, bring more Fortune 500 companies into the fold

  • MOSS Q4: Supporting the Python Ecosystem

    Mozilla was born out of, and remains a part of, the open source and free software movement. Through the Mozilla Open Source Support (MOSS) program, we recognize, celebrate, and support open source projects that contribute to our work and to the health of the Internet. That’s why in 2017 we invested $1,650,000 in supporting open source projects around the globe. Half a million of which we dispersed just since our last update in October.

  • Opensource gratitude

    Some weeks ago I’ve read somewhere in Twitter about how good will be to adopt and share the practice of thanking the opensource developers of the tools you use and love. Don’t remember neither who or where, and probably I’m stealing the method s/he proposed.

  • GrammaTech Releases Automated Software Engineering Library Into Open Source

    Researchers in automated software engineering now have access to proven industrial strength tools to automate common programming tasks. GrammaTech, Inc., a leading developer of commercial embedded software analysis and transformation tools, announced immediate availability of their Software Evolution Library (SEL) as open source software, licensed under the GNU General Public License (GPL).

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Mozilla Development

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Moz/FF
  • Firefox’s continued Quantum transformation—more multithreading, tracking protection

    Firefox 58, out today, continues to deliver Project Quantum, Mozilla's far-reaching modernization effort that's boosting the browser's performance, security, and maintainability. The initiative allows Firefox to take better advantage of modern multicore processors and makes the browser better suited to the demands of today's Web applications.

  • MozMEAO SRE Status Report - January 23, 2018

    Here’s what happened on the MozMEAO SRE team from December 2017 - January 23.

  • WebRender capture infrastructure

    For over a year now, I’ve been hacking on WebRender. It was born in Servo as an experimental way to batch the painting and compositing of the web content on GPU. Today it’s a solid piece of engineering that’s going to mainline Firefox as the next big Rust-written component within the Quantum project. You can read more about WebRender on our team’s blog as well as this wonderfully illustrated article by Lin Clark.

  • The Different Types of Privacy Protection

    Many of your favorite sites keep track of what you do online. They may do it to understand if you’re interested in a particular article, item or activity. They may do it to make your experience of their site easier. They may also track you so they can try to sell you things.

    Online ads can be customized on the fly based on what you do. Been searching for a new pair of Chucks? Mega Shoe Company has a great deal for you. To serve those custom ads at just the right time, the shoe company needs to know where you go online. Is that bad? Some argue that customized (targeted) ads are much better than traditional billboards or radio spots. At least with targeted ads, there’s a good chance you’ve been looking for what they’re selling. But you may not want companies following you around the web.

  • Introducing the MDN Product Advisory Board: actions and impressions from our first meeting

    On January 11th, 2018, Mozilla held the first in-person meeting of the MDN Product Advisory Board (PAB) in London. The goal of the MDN Product Advisory Board, in collaboration with Microsoft, Google, and other industry leaders, is to provide guidance that helps MDN be the best reference for web developers.

    To that end, I’m pleased to announce that the web platform consultancy Bocoup, represented by Rick Waldron, will be joining the MDN Product Advisory Board starting in February. Bocoup brings a practitioner’s perspective to the the standards process and participates in a wide range of open source projects. Rick has actively contributed to MDN since May of 2011, writing documentation, reviewing contributions, and participating in the maintenance of the JavaScript Reference sub-articles. He’s written proposals and specifications for new JavaScript APIs and syntax, participated in ECMAScript® 2015, 2016, 2017 Language Specifications, and represents Bocoup at ECMA TC39 meetings. I’m very excited Rick will be adding his considerable industry knowledge and JavaScript focus to the board and look forward to him joining our next meeting.

Mozilla Firefox 58

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Moz/FF
  • Latest Firefox Quantum release available with faster, always-on privacy with opt-in Tracking Protection and new features

    We accept things in the online world that we wouldn’t accept in the physical one. For instance, how would you feel if you popped your head in a store and that store now had the ability to keep sending you flyers even if you didn’t buy anything? Online, we often visit sites that track us, but it isn’t clear when this is happening or how the information is being used. Adding insult to injury, this often invisible tracking actually slows down web pages.

  • Firefox 58 Arrives With Continued Speed Optimizations

    Mozilla has set free Firefox 58.0 today as their latest "Firefox Quantum" release that continues work on being a performant web browser.

  • Firefox Quantum 58 builds on performance gains, improves screenshots tool

    Mozilla is rolling out Firefox Quantum 58.0 for desktop, along with Firefox for Android 58.0. It arrives over two months after the landmark release of Firefox Quantum 57.0.

    The latest build focuses on performance and security, while an update to Firefox’s user profile feature means it’s no longer backwards compatible with previous versions. Android users also gain the ability to pin favorite websites to their home screen for use like native apps.

  • Firefox 58 Released for Linux, Mac, and Windows

    The Mozilla Foundation has made Firefox 58 files available for download on its official FTP servers. An official announcement will be made later today when the organization will also release the final changelog.

  • Browse without baggage in Firefox: Set Tracking Protection to always on

    We just can’t stop making Firefox faster — and with our most recent release, we also made it easier for you to control how much you’re tracked.

  • Firefox 58: The Quantum Era Continues

    2017 was a big year for Mozilla, culminating in the release of Firefox Quantum, a massive multi-year re-tooling of the browser focused on speed, and laying the groundwork for the years to come. In 2018, we’ll build on that incredible foundation, and in that spirit our next several releases will continue to bear the Quantum moniker. Let’s take a look at some of the new goodies that Firefox 58 brings.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

GNOME Shell vs. KDE Plasma Graphics Tests On Wayland vs. X.Org Server

A premium member this week had requested some benchmarks of openSUSE Tumbleweed when looking at the performance of KDE Plasma vs. GNOME Shell in some open-source graphics/gaming tests while also looking at the Wayland vs. X.Org Server performance. With KDE Plasma 5.12 that openSUSE Tumbleweed has picked up, there is much better Wayland session support compared to previous releases. While KDE developers aren't yet ready to declare their Wayland session the default, in my experience so far it's been working out very well but still routinely will find application crashes in Kate and the like when testing under the KWin's Wayland compositor. Read more

Stable kernels 4.15.6, 4.14.22, 4.9.84, 4.4.118 and 3.18.96

Android Leftovers