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Moz/FF

An introduction to Mozilla's Secure Open Source Fund

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Interviews
Moz/FF
OSS

Thanks Mark. Mozilla is a unique institution—it's both a nonprofit mission-driven organization and a technology industry corporation. We build open source software (most notably the Firefox Web browser) and we are champions for the open Internet in technical and political fora. We've been a global leader on well-known policy issues like privacy and net neutrality, and we're also very active on most of today's big topics including copyright reform, encryption, and software vulnerabilities.

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Mozilla News

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Moz/FF
  • Get Better Firefox Look on Linux With These Extensions

    Firefox is one of the most used web browsers on the Web. According to Clicky, it holds around 20% of the global market share. Firefox is also installed by default in almost all Linux distributions. So it’s very likely to see Linux users using it all the time, although many other alternatives are available like Chromium and Epiphany.

    Since the web browser’s window is all what many of us see the whole day, you may want to customize its appearance. We are not talking about “personas” or those simple backgrounds that you put to colorize a small part of the browser’s window. We are talking about changing the theme totally. Firefox does this using “Complete Themes“.

  • Firefox sandbox on Linux tightened

    As just announced on mozilla.dev.platform, we landed a set of changes in today's Nightly that tightens our sandboxing on Linux. The content process, which is the part of Firefox that renders webpages and executes any JavaScript on them, had been previously restricted in the amount of system calls that it could access. As of today, it no longer has write access to the filesystem, barring an exception for shared memory and /tmp. We plan to also remove the latter, eventually.

  • Mozilla is working on Form Autofill for Firefox

    Mozilla is currently working on bringing form autofill functionality to its Firefox web browser.

    Firefox remembers form data by default that you enter on sites, but the browser does not ship with options to create profiles that you may use on any form you encounter while using the browser.

Mozilla awards $300,000 to four open source projects

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Moz/FF

Mozilla's love of open source is nothing new -- just look to the Mozilla Open Source Support (MOSS) program. Loving a philosophy is one thing, but Mozilla has also put its money where its mouth is.

In the third quarter of this year, MOSS awarded more than $300,000 to four projects which it either already supported, or which were aligned with the organization's mission. One of the smallest awards -- $56,000 -- was made to Speech Rule Engine, a text-to-speech style component that makes mathematical and scientific content more accessible.

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Also: MOSS supports four more open source projects in Q3 2016 with $300k

Mozilla, Firefox News

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Moz/FF
  • Firefox ready to block certificate authority that threatened Web security

    The organization that develops Firefox has recommended the browser block digital credentials issued by a China-based certificate authority for 12 months after discovering it cut corners that undermine the entire transport layer security system that encrypts and authenticates websites.

    The browser-trusted WoSign authority intentionally back-dated certificates it has issued over the past nine months to avoid an industry-mandated ban on the use of the SHA-1 hashing algorithm, Mozilla officials charged in a report published Monday. SHA-1-based signatures were barred at the beginning of the year because of industry consensus they are unacceptably susceptible to cryptographic collision attacks that can create counterfeit credentials. To satisfy customers who experienced difficulty retiring the old hashing function, WoSign continued to use it anyway and concealed the use by dating certificates prior to the first of this year, Mozilla officials said. They also accused WoSign of improperly concealing its acquisition of Israeli certificate authority StartCom, which was used to issue at least one of the improperly issued certificates.

    "Taking into account all the issues listed above, Mozilla's CA team has lost confidence in the ability of WoSign/StartCom to faithfully and competently discharge the functions of a CA," Monday's report stated. "Therefore we propose that, starting on a date to be determined in the near future, Mozilla products will no longer trust newly issued certificates issued by either of these two CA brands."

  • Firefox gains serious speed and reliability and loses some bloat

    There's no way around it. Firefox has struggled. As of this writing, Firefox 47 is the top of the Firefox market share heap at a scant 3.14 %. Given that Chrome 52 holds 23.96 % and IE 11 holds 17.74 %, the chances of Firefox displacing either, anytime soon, is slim. If you scroll way down on the browser market share listing, you'll notice Firefox 49 (the latest release) is at .19 %. Considering 49 is the stable release candidate that was only recently unleashed, that is understandable (to a point).

    Thing is, Firefox 49 is a really, really good browser. But is it good enough to give the open source browser any significant gains in the realm of market share? Let's take a look at what the Mozilla developers have brought to the fore with the latest release of their flagship browser and see how much hope it holds for the future of the software that was once leader among its peers.

  • Mozilla's Project Mortar Wants Pepper API Flash & PDFium In Firefox

    This week word of Mozilla's "Project Mortar" surfaced, which aims to explore the possibility of bringing the PDFium library and Pepper API based Flash plugin into Firefox. This project is being led by various Mozilla engineers.

    Mozilla is so far developing Project Mortar in private while they plan to open it up in the future.

Mozilla's Rust 1.12

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Development
Moz/FF
  • Announcing Rust 1.12

    The Rust team is happy to announce the latest version of Rust, 1.12. Rust is a systems programming language with the slogan “fast, reliable, productive: pick three.”

    As always, you can install Rust 1.12 from the appropriate page on our website, and check out the detailed release notes for 1.12 on GitHub. 1361 patches were landed in this release.

  • Rust 1.12 Programming Language Released

    Rust 1.12 has been released as the newest version of this popular programming language with a focus on "fast, reliable, productive: pick three."

Firefox Changes

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Moz/FF
  • Mozilla has “stopped all commercial development of Firefox OS”

    Remember when Mozilla said it was ceasing development of Firefox OS for smartphones, but that it wasn’t giving up on the browser-based operating system altogether? Yeah, now the organization has pretty much thrown in the towel.

    After shifting the focus from phones to smart TVs and other Internet of Things products for a while, Mozilla senior engineering program manager Julie McCracken says development of the operating system was “gradually wound down” and that as of the end of July Mozilla has “stopped all commercial development of Firefox OS.

  • Firefox’s Test Pilot Program Launches Three New Experimental Features

    Earlier this year we launched our first set of experiments for Test Pilot, a program designed to give you access to experimental Firefox features that are in the early stages of development. We’ve been delighted to see so many of you participating in the experiments and providing feedback, which ultimately, will help us determine which features end up in Firefox for all to enjoy.

    Since our launch, we’ve been hard at work on new innovations, and today we’re excited to announce the release of three new Test Pilot experiments. These features will help you share and manage screenshots; keep streaming video front and center; and protect your online privacy.

Mozilla, Firefox, and FirefoxOS

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Moz/FF
  • B2G OS and Gecko Annoucement from Ari Jaaksi & David Bryant

    In the spring and summer of 2016 the Connected Devices team dug deeper into opportunities for Firefox OS. They concluded that Firefox OS TV was a project to be run by our commercial partner and not a project to be led by Mozilla. Further, Firefox OS was determined to not be sufficiently useful for ongoing Connected Devices work to justify the effort to maintain it. This meant that development of the Firefox OS stack was no longer a part of Connected Devices, or Mozilla at all. Firefox OS 2.6 would be the last release from Mozilla. Today we are announcing the next phase in that evolution. While work at Mozilla on Firefox OS has ceased, we very much need to continue to evolve the underlying code that comprises Gecko, our web platform engine, as part of the ongoing development of Firefox. In order to evolve quickly and enable substantial new architectural changes in Gecko, Mozilla’s Platform Engineering organization needs to remove all B2G-related code from mozilla-central. This certainly has consequences for B2G OS. For the community to continue working on B2G OS they will have to maintain a code base that includes a full version of Gecko, so will need to fork Gecko and proceed with development on their own, separate branch.

  • Firefox 53 Will Drop Support for Windows XP and Windows Vista

    Software companies are one by one giving up on Windows XP support for their products, and now it appears that it’s Mozilla’s turn to switch the focus to newer versions of Windows.

    Firefox 53 will be the first version of the browser which will no longer support Windows XP and Windows Vista, so users who haven’t yet upgraded to Windows 7 or newer will have to either stick with Firefox 52 or move to a different browser.

  • Boot 2 Gecko Being Stripped From Mozilla's Codebase

    At the end of 2015 Mozilla effectively put an end to Firefox OS / Boot 2 Gecko by concluding things weren't working out for Mozilla Corp and their commercial partners to ship Firefox OS smartphones. All commercial development around it has since stopped and they are now preparing to strip B2G from the mozilla-central code-base.

    The news to report on now is that Ari Jaaksi and David Bryant have announced, "Today we are announcing the next phase in that evolution. While work at Mozilla on Firefox OS has ceased, we very much need to continue to evolve the underlying code that comprises Gecko, our web platform engine, as part of the ongoing development of Firefox. In order to evolve quickly and enable substantial new architectural changes in Gecko, Mozilla’s Platform Engineering organization needs to remove all B2G-related code from mozilla-central. This certainly has consequences for B2G OS. For the community to continue working on B2G OS they will have to maintain a code base that includes a full version of Gecko, so will need to fork Gecko and proceed with development on their own, separate branch."

Mozilla Firefox 49.0 and Thunderbird 45.3 Land in All Supported Ubuntu OSes

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Moz/FF

Today, September 22, 2016, Chris Coulson from Canonical published two security advisories to inform the Ubuntu Linux community about the availability of the latest Mozilla products in all supported releases.

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Mozilla Says Goodbye to Firefox Hello in Firefox 49

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Moz/FF

In October 2014, as part of the Firefox 34 beta release, Mozilla introduced its Firefox Hello communications technology enabling users to make calls directly from the browser. On Sept. 20, 2016, Mozilla formally removed support for Firefox Hello as part of the new Firefox 49 release.

The Mozilla Bugzilla entry for the removal of Firefox Hello provides little insight as to why the communications feature is being pulled from the open-source browser. As it turns out, the Firefox Hello removal is related to shifting priorities at Mozilla.

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Web browsers for GNU/Linux

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Moz/FF
Web
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • OpenShot 2.2 Offers Free, Open Source Pro Editing for 4K and 5K Videos
    4K ultra HD resolution is without a doubt now at least the mainstream near future standard for digital recording, content and display resolution and we don’t expect this to change for at least a few years. The majority of new larger 50 inch+ TVs going on sale today are 4K models, 4K monitors are becoming much more common and now virtually all mid-range to premium digital recording cameras offer ultra HD resolution of at least [email protected] x 2160 pixels and in many cases even higher.
  • Google Drive CLI Client For Linux
    Google Drive is one of the most popular services to store your files in the cloud. You can access to your Google Drive account through a web browser or using a client. This time I’m going to talk about one Google Drive client but without graphical interface, in this tutorial you’re going to know how to use a client through the command line interface to access, download and upload to your google drive.
  • Calligra 3.0 Open-Source Office Suite Officially Released, Krita and Author Out
    After a long time in development, Calligra, the open-source office suite designed for KDE Plasma desktops, makes a comeback in 2017 with the release of the 3.0 milestone. While many GNU/Linux users were able to download and install the new Calligra 3.0 office suite from the official channels of the project or the stable software repositories of their favorite GNU/Linux distribution since last week, an official announcement was published earlier this week.
  • Free Software Foundation Makes ‘Major Overhaul’ In High Priority Projects
    Coolness alert! The Free Software Foundation has announced an updated list of high priority projects on a global scale. Top priorities now include a free software phone operating system, clouds, hardware, voice and video chat, inclusiveness, security and internationalisation of free software. The announcement is available here. It includes a link to the new list. The update followed feedback from about 150 free software community members over the past year. FSF isn’t seeking to run or control the projects, but will encourage them whether they are under their auspices or not, they said.
  • GNU Screen v.4.5.0
    I’m proud to announce the release of GNU Screen v.4.5. This time it’s mostly a bugfix release. We added just one new feature: now it’s possible to specify logfile name by using parameter -L (default name stays screenlog.0). Myself also spent some time to make source code a bit cleaner. As you probably noticed we were going to release 4.5 until Christmas. Unfortunately, we could not do it because of some internal GNU problems. I’m very apologise for that.

OSS Leftovers

  • Why 2017 Will Bring Cheer for Open Source Enthusiasts
    A few years ago, open source was the less-glamourous and low-cost alternative in the enterprise world, and no one would have taken the trouble to predict what its future could look like. Fast-forward to 2016, many of us will be amazed by how open source has become the de facto standard for nearly everything inside an enterprise. Open source today is the primary engine for innovation and business transformation. Cost is probably the last reason for an organisation to go in for open source. An exclusive market study conducted by North Bridge and Black Duck brought some fascinating statistics a few months ago. In the study titled “Future of Open Source”, about 90 percent of surveyed organisations said that open source improves efficiency, interoperability and innovation. What is even more significant is the finding that the adoption of open source for production environments outpaced the proprietary software for the first time – more than 55 percent leverage OSS for production infrastructure.
  • Five ways open source accelerates IoT
    Just having seen Passengers in the theater the other night, I reflected on how soon we might see a self-piloted space vessel like this transporting passengers through deep space. This incredible film features a spacecraft that is a work of IoT art, where things interact with one another to manage some of the harshest conditions imaginable. As an advocate for open source software and the innovation derived from its collaborative development methodology, I have a deep interest in how the journey to an IoT where a future like this is possible can benefit from open source solutions. I would even argue that the acceptance of open source methodologies has helped IoT gain momentum, capture mindshare and quickly deliver real results.
  • How to gain confidence to participate in open source
    As your brain develops, you learn about what you can and should do in the world, and what you can't and shouldn't. Your actions are influenced by surroundings and norms, and many times what keeps you from participating is a lack of self-confidence.

Debian Isn't Difficult, Fedora Elections Winners, Fav Distro

Prospective users still avoid Debian initially because it's difficult to install, or so they believe. It turns out they're not basing their opinions on real life. Keith Curtis wrote up his experience installing Arch on his new Lenovo laptop, after a fairly complete hardware review as well. Jamie Watson got a new notebook too and today shared a bit on getting it ready for Linux. Part of that was booting Mint 18.1 which gave him something to smile about. Elsewhere, the Fedora committee elections results are in and Dominique Leuenberger posted a review of this week in Tumbleweed. Gary Newell test drove Elementary OS 0.4 and OpenSource.com asked, "What is your favorite Linux distribution?" Read more

Games for GNU/Linux