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Moz/FF

Thunderbird 60 Released

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Moz/FF
Web
  • Thunderbird Release Notes

    Thunderbird version 60 is currently only offered as direct download from thunderbird.net and not as upgrade from Thunderbird version 52 or earlier. If you have installed Lightning, Mozilla's Calendar add-on, it will automatically be updated to match the new version of Thunderbird. Refer to this troubleshooting article in case of problems.

  • Thunderbird 60.0 Released With WebExtension Themes, Attachment Improvements

    For those of you that have been waiting for a big update to the Thunderbird mail/RSS client, Thunderbird 60.0 is now available with plenty of changes.

  • What’s New in Thunderbird 60

    Thunderbird 60, the newest stable release of everyone’s favorite desktop Email client, has been released. This version of Thunderbird is packed full of great new features, fixes, and changes that improve the user experience and make for a worthwhile upgrade. I’ll highlight three of the biggest changes in Thunderbird 60 in this post, check out the full release notes over on our website.

Mozilla: Address Bar and More

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Moz/FF
  • How to add the share menu to the Firefox address bar

    While working on my previous blog post, I came across another great feature you may not know about. Let’s say you use the Share menu, but opening the Page Actions menu requires too much navigation. You need quicker access!

    To add an item to the address Bar, right-click on it and select Add to Address Bar.
    To remove it, right-click on the item and select Remove from Address Bar.

  • New backend for storage.local API

    To help improve Firefox performance, the backend for the storage.local API is migrating from JSON to IndexedDB. These changes will soon be enabled on Firefox Nightly and will stabilize when Firefox 63 lands in the Beta channel. If your users switch between Firefox channels using the same profile during this time, they may experience data regression in the extensions they have previously installed.

    We recommend that users do not change Firefox channels between now and September 5, 2018. However, if they do and they contact you with questions about why their extensions are not behaving normally (such as losing saved options or other local data), please point them to this post for instructions on how to retrieve and re-import their extension data.

  • Happy BMO Push Day!
  • This Week in Mixed Reality: Issue 14

    It's been another busy week in MR land for the team. We are getting really close to releasing some fun new features.

Ctrl-Q issue or “are Firefox developers using Linux at all?”

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GNU
Linux
Moz/FF

When I started using Linux on my desktop there was only Mozilla based browsers which were usable. They had different names: Galeon, Firebird, Phoenix, Mozilla Suite and finally Firefox.

It worked better or worse but did. There were moments when on 2GB ram machine browser was using 6 gigabytes (which resulted in killing it). Then were moments when it started to be slower and slower so I moved to Google Chrome instead.

But still — Firefox had all those extensions which could do insane amount of things with how browser looks, how it works etc. But then Quantum came and changed that. Good bye all nice addons. Hope we meet in other life.

But what it has with question from post title? Simple, little, annoying thing: “Ctrl-Q” shortcut. Lovely one which everyone is using to close application they work with. Not that it does not work — it does. Perfectly. And this is a problem…

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Things Gateway 0.5

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Moz/FF
  • Things Gateway 0.5 packed full of new features, including experimental smart assistant

    The Things Gateway from Mozilla lets you directly monitor and control your home over the web, without a middleman.

    Today the Mozilla IoT team is excited to announce the 0.5 release of the Things Gateway, which is packed full of new features including customisable devices, a more powerful rules engine, an interactive floorplan and an experimental smart assistant you can talk to.

    [...]

    How to Get Involved

    To try out the latest version of the gateway, download the software image from our website to use on a Raspberry Pi. If you already have a gateway set up, you should notice it automatically update itself to the 0.5 release.

  • Mozilla Announces Things Gateway 0.5, Reddit Security Incident, Docker Moving to a New Release Cycle, Artifact Coming in November and LibreOffice 6.0.6 Now Available

    The Mozilla IoT team announced the 0.5 release of the Things Gateway this morning, which is "packed full of new features including customisable devices, a more powerful rules engine, an interactive floorplan and an experimental smart assistant you can talk to." If you want to try out this new version of the gateway, you can download it from here and use it on your Raspberry Pi. According to the press release, "A powerful new 'capabilities' system means that devices are no longer restricted to a predefined set of Web Thing Types, but can be assembled from an extensible schema-based system of 'capabilities' through our new schema repository. This means that developers have much more flexibility to create weird and wacky devices, and users have more control over how the device is used."

  • Mozilla’s Things Gateway 0.5 offers Interactive Floorplan View and a Smart Assistant

    Mozilla’s Things Gateway software just received a new update today in its version 0.5 and it offers several interesting features. These new features include support for custom devices and new protocols, safe authorisation of third party applications for accessing gateway, strengthened rules engine, an interactive floor plan view which lets the user lay out devices on the home map and most importantly, an ‘experimental’ smart assistant which can directly be spoken to.

    Things Gateway is a Project Things’ component which aims at providing everyone with the services and software required for bridging communication among connected devices. This software is an operating system which is Raspberry Pi-compatible and lets the user control and monitor their home over the internet. The latest update to the software has further expanded the controls for its users. According to Ben Francis at Mozilla Hacks, this software allows for the management of all devices being used in the house through ‘a single secure web interface’. He further wrote, “Today I’m excited to tell you about the latest version of the Things Gateway and how you can use it to directly monitor and control your home over the web, without a middleman. Instead of installing a different mobile app for every smart home device you buy, you can manage all your devices through a single secure web interface.”

Firefox 63: Linux out-of-process extensions

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Moz/FF

Mozilla plans to enable out-of-process extensions for Firefox running on GNU/Linux systems in Firefox 63. The organization plans to release Firefox 63 on October 23, 2018 for all supported desktop and mobile operating systems.

Mozilla added multi-process capabilities to Firefox 49 and improved the functionality in future releases. Multi-process separates different parts of the web browser, for instance browser tabs and the core browser, to improve security and stability.

Work on Firefox's security sandbox continues, and so does work on moving additional elements to their own process. Mozilla added supported for out-of-process extensions in Firefox 56 on Windows, and added the functionality in Firefox 61 to installations of the web browser running on Mac OS X.

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Programming: ProjectQ and Rust

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Development
Moz/FF
Sci/Tech
  • Open-Source Software Framework Makes Quantum Computing More Accessible

    To help further this field, Häner and a team at ETH Zurich created ProjectQ, a free, open-source software framework for quantum computing that allows users to implement their quantum programs in the high-level programming language Python using a powerful and intuitive syntax. ProjectQ can then translate these programs to any type of back-end, either a simulator run on a classical computer or an actual quantum chip.

  • This Week in Rust 245

    Always wanted to contribute to open-source projects but didn't know where to start? Every week we highlight some tasks from the Rust community for you to pick and get started!

Mozilla Development/News/Policy

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Moz/FF
  • G20 digital process: Trust requires more transparency and inclusion

    We commend the Argentine G20 Presidency for continuing to build momentum around the G20 digital process and look forward to seeing the Declaration and the progress made to that end following the Digital Ministerial on August 24.

    However, we can’t ignore the lack of transparency and the step back from multistakeholder engagement that was championed under last year’s G20 Presidency by Germany. Mozilla appreciated the invitation to attend the G20-B20 workshops on July 30, which allowed for providing input into the Digital Declaration. But inviting pre-selected organisations to an unofficial side event on comparatively short notice is not sufficient for a meaningfully transparent and inclusive process.

  • Safe Harbor for Security Bug Bounty Participants

    Mozilla established one of the first modern security bug bounty programs back in 2004. Since that time, much of the technology industry has followed our lead and bounty programs have become a critical tool for finding security flaws in the software we all use. But even while these programs have reached broader acceptance, the legal protections afforded to bounty program participants have failed to evolve, putting security researchers at risk and possibly stifling that research.

    That is why we are announcing changes to our bounty program policies to better protect security researchers working to improve Firefox and to codify the best practices that we’ve been using.

    We often hear of researchers who are concerned that companies or governments may take legal actions against them for their legitimate security research. For example, the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) – essentially the US anti-hacking law that criminalizes unauthorized access to computer systems – could be used to punish bounty participants testing the security of systems and software. Just the potential for legal liability might discourage important security research.

  • August’s Featured Extensions
  • Mozilla B-Team: happy bmo push day!

Mozilla: Dweb, Ruby on Rails and More

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Moz/FF
  • Introducing the Dweb

    The web is the most successful programming platform in history, resulting in the largest open and accessible collection of human knowledge ever created. So yeah, it’s pretty great. But there are a set of common problems that the web is not able to address.

  • Firefox needs some more RAM to run your Rails system tests

    A quick fix for an annoying (and not very descriptive) error Browsing context has been discarded when setting up Ruby on Rails system tests with Firefox headless.

  • Cameron McCormack: Back

    Since coming back, I’ve been serving as technical lead for the Firefox Layout team, which really just means being a bit more involved, along with Maire and our new Layout team manager Sean, in the team’s planning work. We’ve got a lot going on! It also means getting back into standards work, and I had a great time meeting old friends and colleagues at the CSS Working Group’s meeting last month in Sydney.

  • Checking minidumps for memory corruption

    Recently I was investigating some Firefox crashes that were occurring in the style system, somewhere in Rust code. These were persistent, low frequency crashes, being reported around 25 times per day. Our crash report database, crash-stats, indexes crashes by signature, which is the top one or more stack frames. From the bug report, I could see that these crashes were all in the same function, although the exact stack trace that led to calling this function varied across crashes.

    On a good day, looking at a crash report will reveal the bug without too much effort. For example, it’s usually easy to see when a null pointer has been dereferenced (the address being read or written will be somewhere around 0x0), and hopefully it’s obvious from looking at the surrounding code whether a null pointer should have been guarded against. On a bad day, you can spend hours working backwards from the crash, trying to work out how the program ended up where it did.

Mozilla is Evolving the Firefox Brand (New Logo/s)

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Moz/FF
  • Evolving the Firefox Brand

    Say “Firefox” and most people think of a web browser on their laptop or phone, period. TL;DR, there’s more to the story now, and our branding needs to evolve.

    With the rapid evolution of the internet, people need new tools to make the most of it. So Firefox is creating new types of browsers and a range of new apps and services with the internet as the platform. From easy screen-shotting and file sharing to innovative ways to access the internet using voice and virtual reality, these tools will help people be more efficient, safer, and in control of their time online. Firefox is where purpose meets performance.

  • Jim Hall: What an icon says about you

    Once upon a time, the Netscape "N" was instantly recognizable as the web browser's brand icon. Later, the organization spun off into Mozilla, represented by a less memorable big red dragon head. Finally, we have Firefox, represented by a stylized fox wrapped around a small globe. The fox icon has represented the Firefox brand for years, although now the Firefox organization wants to change the brand icon.

    From an article in Venture Beat: "For most people, Firefox refers to a browser, but the company wants the brand to encompass all the various apps and services that the Firefox family of internet products cover," and "The fox with a flaming tail 'doesn't offer enough design tools to represent this entire product family'." The Firefox name will remain, but the branding will change.

  • Mozilla Is Changing Firefox Logo After Years, Wants Your Feedback

    When we think of the Firefox browser, the image of the red panda logo immediately comes to our mind. Mozilla is about to change that, and a redesigned logo will represent the versatility of products the company has started making.

    As per its blog post, Mozilla is going through possible design considerations and has invited users to post their comments. It wants to know whether the new design system still feels like Firefox, reinforces Firefox’s speed, reliability, wit and at the same time represents Mozilla’s position as a people over profit company.

Mozilla: Screenshots, WeTransfer Extension for Firefox, and WebRender

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • New Features in Screenshots

    As part of our Screenshots release on July 26, 2018, we thought we’d update you on a few new features that we think you’ll find especially useful.

    We shipped a simple image editor a few months ago to enable users to annotate and crop their shots. Now we are expanding the editor with three more features: undo, redo, and text.

  • Free your mind and move your biggest files with the WeTransfer extension for Firefox

    When you’re in the zone, be it creative or analytical, anything you can do to stay there is an asset. It’s part of why we build and design Firefox to be powerful, efficient and easy to use. It’s also why extensions can be a magic powerup for keeping you in flow online. They help you get more done in the browser, saving your brain from taxing context switching.

  • Mozilla GFX: WebRender newsletter #21

    Hi there, WebRender’s newsletter is here, delayed again by some vacation time sprinkled with a fair amount of the traditional “I’m busy” excuse. It’s been a while so there is a lot below (without counting the items I probably missed in the overwhelming amount of stuff that went into WebRender and Gecko since the last newsletter.

    One of the highlights this time is something I have been focusing on for a while, building on the async scene building infrastructure to move blob image rasterization off of the render backend thread. Instead of lazily rasterizing blob images in the critical path we now eager rasterize a subset of the blobs asynchronously during scene building. This makes sure expensive blob rasterization never prevent us from producing 60 frames per second during scrolling.
    The other highlight is that we started gathering telemetry numbers on the nightly population that opted into WebRender, and these numbers are very positive, even in areas that we haven’t spent any time optimizing yet.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

OSS Leftovers

  • Editor's Corner—Open source is not 'one size fits all' [Ed: But that's a plus, not a minus. With proprietary software it's one unsuitable thing for everything; doesn't scale.]
    Open source communities are no doubt playing a key role in moving the telecommunications industry forward, but not everyone is on board the bandwagon. Over the past five months or so, we've spent a fair amount of time writing about open source groups and standards development organizations (SDOs) such as the Linux Foundation, MEF, Open Networking Foundation, OpenDaylight, the TM Forum and ETSI, and there's clearly more cooperation afoot for the good of the industry. But artificial intelligence startup B.Yond's chief marketing officer, Rikard Kjellberg, said his company has to be careful when it comes to choosing which open source community to commit its resources to. Kjellberg spoke to FierceTelecom on the heels of the AT&T Spark conference earlier this month.
  • Collabora Had Another Stellar Year For Open-Source Consulting
    The Collabora open-source consulting firm whose expertise spans from the Linux kernel to LibreOffice and X.Org had another successful year. The UK-based company last week reported their 2017 financial position last week providing a glimpse at the viability of open-source / free software consulting.
  • Daniel Stenberg: The Polhem prize, one year later
    Family and friends have gotten a rudimentary level of understanding of what curl is and what it does. I'm not suggesting they fully grasp it or know what an "internet protocol" is now, but at least a lot of people understand that it works with "internet transfers". It's not like people were totally uninterested before, but when I was given this prize - by a jury of engineers no less - that says this is a significant invention and accomplishment with a value that "can not be overestimated", it made them more interested. The little video that was produced helped:
  • Open Source Voice Assistant, Mycroft AI, Named Top Deal By KingsCrowd
  • Service providers increasingly adopt open source for their networks
    Communications service providers (CSPs) are increasingly keen to adopt open source technologies to deliver their services, according to research. At this week’s Open Networking Summit Europe in Amsterdam, delegates heard that DevOps, automation, cloud, big data and analytics, software-defined networking (SDN), and management and orchestration (MANO) were increasingly being supported by open source solutions. Commissioned research questioned 150 CSP representatives across 98 companies worldwide. It found that 98% of CSPs are “confident” that open networking solutions can achieve the same level of performance as traditional networking solutions.
  • Communications Service Providers Overwhelmingly Confident in Open Source Networking Solutions, Survey Finds
  • WLinux Distro for Windows Subsystem for Linux Now Available, openSUSE Call for Hosts, New Firefox Bug, Firefox Collecting Telemetry Data and Creative Commons Releases Significant CC Search Update
    In other Firefox news, the browser evidently is collecting telemetry data via hidden add-ons, ITWire reports. The ITWire post also quotes Mozilla's Marshall Eriwn, director of Trust and Security: "...we will measure Telemetry Coverage, which is the percentage of all Firefox users who report telemetry. The Telemetry Coverage measurement will sample a portion of all Firefox clients and report whether telemetry is enabled. This measurement will not include a client identifier and will not be associated with our standard telemetry."
  • This “Netflix For Open Source” Startup Helps Programmers Get Paid
    Open source developers, especially those who work on lesser known projects, do not get much attention or money for the work they do. While some developers are paid to work on open source projects as a part of their day jobs, they can get overwhelmed by the amount of work these projects require.
  • Portable Computing Language 1.2 Released For OpenCL On CPUs & More
    The Portable Computing Language (a.k.a. POCL or PortableCL) is the effort for getting OpenCL running on CPUs as well as other hardware for this open-source code-base that supports OpenCL 1.2 with some OpenCL 2.0+ functionality. The main "feature" of POCL 1.2 is support for LLVM Clang 7.0 as previously the support was limited to LLVM 6.0, but now this new version of LLVM is supported. The HWLOC 2.0 library is also now supported. There are also some minor feature additions like device-side printf being supported.
  • Robert O'Callahan: More Realistic Goals For C++ Lifetimes 1.0
    Over two years ago I wrote about the C++ Lifetimes proposal and some of my concerns about it. Just recently, version 1.0 was released with a blog post by Herb Sutter. Comparing the two versions shows many important changes. The new version is much clearer and more worked-out, but there are also significant material changes. In particular the goal has changed dramatically.

Money and Press for FOSS FUD firms

Android Leftovers