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Moz/FF

Microsoft’s browsers are shedding users, new Firefox for Ubuntu, Firefox axes Windows XP support

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Google
Moz/FF
Web

Firefox 52 Released With WebAssembly Support, Security Fixes, CSS Grid

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Moz/FF

Mozilla has rolled out Firefox 52.0 as the latest version of their open-source, cross-platform web browser.

Perhaps most exciting about Firefox 52 is the WebAssembly support is present. Firefox 52 also warns about non-secure HTTP pages with logins, Strict Secure Cookies support, a number of security fixes, dropped support for NPAPI besides Adobe Flash (a.k.a. no more Silverlight/Java/Acrobat support), download improvements, improved security for screen sharing, CSS Grid Layout support, and more.

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Firefox 52 Released With WebAssembly Support, Removes NPAPI Plugins Other Than Flash (Java, Silverlight)

Mozilla News

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Moz/FF
  • A $2 Million Prize for Building a More Accessible Internet

    The Internet can help a young girl in Chicago’s South Side learn how to write JavaScript. It can also keep citizens connected during a time of crisis or disaster.

    But only if the Internet works as intended.

    The Internet should be a public resource open and accessible to all. And, it is to many. But many people still lack reliable, affordable Internet access. And the underlying network itself is increasingly centralized, relying on infrastructure provided by a tiny handful of companies. We don’t have a failsafe if the infrastructure these companies offer is blocked or goes down.

    These are significant issues. Mozilla and the National Science Foundation are committed to finding solutions by supporting bright people and big ideas across the U.S.

  • Firefox 52: Introducing Web Assembly, CSS Grid and the Grid Inspector

    It is definitely an exciting time in the evolution of the web with the adoption of new standards, performance gains, better features for designers, and new tooling. Firefox 52 represents the fruition of a number of features that have been in progress for several years. While many of these will continue to evolve and improve, there’s plenty to celebrate in today’s release of Firefox.

  • Firefox 52 Released With WebAssembly Support, Security Fixes, CSS Grid

    Mozilla has rolled out Firefox 52.0 as the latest version of their open-source, cross-platform web browser.

  • Lots new in Firefox, including “game-changing” support for WebAssembly

    Today’s release of Firefox introduces great new features, making the browser more powerful, convenient, and secure across all your devices.

Mozilla News

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Moz/FF
  • Containers Come to Test Pilot

    The Containers feature in Firefox Nightly gives users the ability to place barriers on the flow of data across sites by isolating cookies, indexedDB, localStorage, and caches within discrete browsing contexts. If you’re interested in the history and technology behind Containers, please read this blog post outlining the rationale for the Nightly implementation.

    While the feature has garnered positive notice among our Nightly audience, there remain outstanding questions about the user experience that suggest the need for further exploration.

  • Link: The Story of Firefox OS

    I worked on Firefox OS for several years as well (I arrived on the project some time after Ben did) until mostly its end. I noticed there was a lot of misunderstanding in what the goal was, and a lot of questions. To me it was a great effort that tried to disrupt the market by opening the silos of mobile applications, using the web, trying to become the third mobile OS. A project a lot of people didn't think fit in Mozilla's mission. Its conclusion was much personal sadness.

  • Firefox OS developer provides a (not so) brief history of the operating system

    Francis notes that it’s unlikely Mozilla will revive the project anytime soon, but he thinks cancelling Firefox OS was a mistake and that if he were starting from scratch he’d focus first on a mid-range tablet rather than entry-level smartphones, focus on a browser-based user interface and try to cede less control over the direction of the project to hardware and network partners.

The Story of Firefox OS

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OS
Moz/FF

I remember at a team dinner once Mitchell Baker, Mozilla’s Chairwoman and “Chief Lizard Wrangler”, talked about the importance of storytelling. She talked about how telling stories in the open source software community helps us to reflect on shared experiences and learn from them.

Well, I’m Ben and I’m a Mozillian. I’m a Software Engineer who worked on the “Boot to Gecko” project full time for five years and I have a story to tell.

As an engineer on the project I don’t quite have the full picture when it comes to the high level decision making, financials and business partnerships. But I was involved in the project for a long period of time, longer in fact than any of its co-founders, and gained quite a lot of insight at the engineering, design and product levels.

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Mozilla Acquires Pocket

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Moz/FF

We are excited to announce that the Mozilla Corporation has completed the acquisition of Read It Later, Inc. the developers of Pocket.

Mozilla is growing, experimenting more, and doubling down on our mission to keep the internet healthy, as a global public resource that’s open and accessible to all. As our first strategic acquisition, Pocket contributes to our strategy by growing our mobile presence and providing people everywhere with powerful tools to discover and access high quality web content, on their terms, independent of platform or content silo.

Pocket will join Mozilla’s product portfolio as a new product line alongside the Firefox web browsers with a focus on promoting the discovery and accessibility of high quality web content. Pocket’s core team and technology will also accelerate Mozilla’s broader Context Graph initiative.

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The Great Debian Iceweasel/Icedove Saga Comes to an End

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Moz/FF
Debian

The hatchet is finally completely buried. Iceweasel was laid to rest a year ago with the return of Firefox to Debian. Now, Icedove gets to go gently into that good night as well, as the Thunderbird email client returns to Debian.

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Mozilla Thunderbird Email Client Finally Makes Its Way Back into Debian's Repos

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Moz/FF

After a long wait, Debian developer Christoph Goehre was proud to announce a couple of days ago that the Mozilla Thunderbird email and news client has officially landed in the repositories of Debian GNU/Linux, de-branding Icedove.

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Mozilla binds Firefox's fate to the Rust language

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Moz/FF

Mozilla always intended for Rust to be used in building key parts of the Firefox browser. Now the company is committing to that vision in a significant manner.

After version 53, Firefox will require Rust to compile successfully, due to the presence of Firefox components built with the language. But this decision may restrict the number of platforms that Firefox can be ported to—for now.

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Mozilla News

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Moz/FF
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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux 4.15, Linux 4.16, and Linux Foundation's CNCF and CII

  • Linux 4.15 Gets Fixed To Report Current CPU Frequency Via /proc/cpuinfo
    A change recently in the Linux kernel led the CPU MHz reported value via /proc/cpuinfo to either be the nominal CPU frequency or the most recently requested frequency. This behavior changed compared to pre-4.13 kernels while now it's been fixed up to report the current CPU frequency.
  • Linux 4.16 Will Be Another Big Cycle For Intel's DRM Driver
    We are just through week one of two for the Linux 4.15 merge window followed by eight or so weeks after that before this next kernel is officially released. But Intel's open-source driver developers have already begun building up a growing stack of changes for Linux 4.16 when it comes to their DRM graphics driver.
  • CNCF Wants You to Use 'Certified Kubernetes'
  • Open Source Threat Modeling
    Application threat modeling is a structured approach to identifying ways that an adversary might try to attack an application and then designing mitigations to prevent, detect or reduce the impact of those attacks. The description of an application’s threat model is identified as one of the criteria for the Linux CII Best Practises Silver badge.

Linux World Domination and Microsoft Corruption in Munich

Programming/Development: 'DevOps', NumPy, Google SLING

  • 5 DevOps leadership priorities in 2018
    This week, DevOps professionals gathered in San Francisco to talk about the state of DevOps in the enterprise. At 1,400 attendees, the sold-out DevOps Enterprise Summit has doubled in size since 2014 – a testament to the growth of the DevOps movement itself. With an ear to this event and an eye on the explosion of tweets coming out of it, here are five key priorities we think IT leaders should be aware of as they take their DevOps efforts into the new year.
  • NumPy Plan for dropping Python 2.7 support
    The Python core team plans to stop supporting Python 2 in 2020. The NumPy project has supported both Python 2 and Python 3 in parallel since 2010, and has found that supporting Python 2 is an increasing burden on our limited resources; thus, we plan to eventually drop Python 2 support as well. Now that we're entering the final years of community-supported Python 2, the NumPy project wants to clarify our plans, with the goal of to helping our downstream ecosystem make plans and accomplish the transition with as little disruption as possible.
  • Google SLING: An Open Source Natural Language Parser
    Google Research has just released an open source project that might be of interest if you are into natural language processing. SLING is a combination of recurrent neural networks and frame based parsing. Natural language parsing is an important topic. You can get meaning from structure and parsing is how you get structure. It is important in processing both text and voice. If you have any hope that Siri, Cortana or Alexa are going to get any better then you need to have better natural language understanding - not just the slot and filler systems currently in use.