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Moz/FF

Mozilla Targets VR, New Servo Update

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Moz/FF
  • Firefox Reality: Bringing the Immersive Web to Mixed Reality Headsets

    Today we are proud to announce Firefox Reality, a new web browser designed from the ground up for stand-alone virtual and augmented reality headsets. We took our existing Firefox web technology and enhanced it with Servo, our experimental web engine. From Firefox, we get decades of web compatibility as well as the performance benefits of Firefox Quantum. From the Servo team (who recently joined the Mixed Reality team) we will gain the ability to experiment with entirely new designs and technologies for seeing and interacting with the immersive web. This is the first step in our long-term plan to deliver a totally new experience on an exciting new platform.

  • Mozilla Brings Firefox to Augmented and Virtual Reality

    Today, we primarily access the Internet through our phones, tablets and computers. But how will the world access the web in five years, or in ten years, and how will the web itself grow and change?

    We believe that the future of the web will be heavily intertwined with virtual and augmented reality, and that future will live through browsers. That’s why we’re building Firefox Reality, a new kind of web browser that has been designed from the ground up to work on stand-alone virtual and augmented reality (or mixed reality) headsets.

  • Firefox Reality is the first open source cross-platform mixed reality browser

    THE MOZILLA FOUNDATION has announced that it is releasing a new version of Firefox specifically for mixed reality (MR).

    Firefox Reality is a "built from the ground up" version of Firefox Quantum specifically designed to meet the needs of those wanting to interact with the web with a stupid hat on their faces.

    "Here at Mozilla, it's our mission to ensure that the Internet is an open and accessible resource that puts people first," explains Sean White, Chief R&D Officer at Mozilla.

    "Currently, the world can browse the open web using our fast and privacy-focused Firefox browser, but continuing that mission in a rapidly changing world means constantly investing our time and resources into new and emerging technologies - and realities."

  • Mozilla Announces Open Source AR/VR Web Browser ‘Firefox Reality’

    Mozilla, the non-profit company behind Firefox web browser, today announced a new cross-platform, open sourced web browser called Firefox Reality, something Mozilla says was built from the ground-up for standalone VR and AR headsets.

  • There’s a new version of Firefox for virtual reality

    Mozilla has announced a new version of its Firefox browser for standalone virtual and augmented reality headsets. It’s called Firefox Reality, and Mozilla describes it as a cross-platform, open source, and privacy-friendly browser whose interface will be specialized for headsets. You can see an early demo of it working on the HTC Vive Focus, but it’s not available publicly yet, and Mozilla hasn’t specified which headsets will support it.

  • This Week In Servo 110

    In the last week, we merged 66 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.

Mozilla: Extensions in Firefox 60, Creative Gigabit Projects, and Foxkeh Dance 2.0

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Moz/FF
  • Extensions in Firefox 60

    Many people read this blog because they’ve written extensions for Firefox in the past. Others, though, know some HTML, CSS, and JavaScript and have been thinking about writing their first extension. Either way, now is the perfect time to jump into the WebExtensions ecosystem.

    That’s because we’re having a contest! Develop an extension for Firefox and enter it into the Firefox Quantum Extensions Challenge by April 15, 2018. Your extension could win you a brand-new Apple iPad Pro or a $250 gift card to Amazon.

  • Announcing $280,000 for Creative Gigabit Projects Across the U.S.

    Today, Mozilla is awarding $280,000 to community technologists who are leveraging gigabit internet for good.

    We’re providing grants to 14 projects in five American cities: Lafayette, LA; Eugene, OR; Chattanooga, TN; Austin, TX; and Kansas City. Grants range from $10,000 to $30,000.

    The projects are diverse: they include a virtual reality experience that shows first-hand the drastic effects of climate change; an interactive Python curriculum for students in low-income school districts; and a program that empowers high school students as environmental watchdogs with the help of advanced mapping software.

  • Foxkeh Dance 2.0

    Well, since Mozilla is currently celebrating its 20th anniversary, it felt right to release an update… Foxkeh Dance 2.0!

Mozilla Thunderbird 60 to Bring Calendar Improvements, MBOX/Maildir Conversions

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Moz/FF

Who said Thunderbird is dying? Mozilla plans to release the 60th version of its open-source and cross-platform email, calendar, and news client, which will introduce a plethora of new features and improvements.

Mozilla Thunderbird 60 entered beta testing earlier this week to allow public testers to take a glimpse at the new features, which include the ability to view locations for calendar events in both the Day and Week views, along with support for deleting, cutting, or copying selected occurrences or entire series for recurring events.

The Calendar component of Thunderbird will also provide users with the ability to send meeting notifications directly instead of displaying a pop-up. On the other hand, Thunderbird 60 will remove the app's capability to send email invitations that are compatible with Microsoft Outlook 2002 and earlier versions.

Read more

On Mozilla turning 20:

  • Gervase Markham: Happy Birthday, Mozilla

    As most of you know, I probably won’t be around to see much more of it, but (this will seem trite if it’s not to seem big-headed!) Mozilla is much more than one or even a few people. There will always be a Mozilla as long as there is an Internet and people who care about people on it. In that vein, let me also say that I’m absolutely delighted with the final outcome of the worldview project. The four items in the addendum to the Manifesto are admirable goals to aim for, and ones I endorse wholeheartedly.

  • Mozilla Turns Twenty

    It’s the morning of March 31, 1998, and the Netscape campus is chock-full of engineers, hours earlier than on a normal day. It’s a Tuesday and it’s known universally in the Netscape browser world as “three thirty-one” and written as 3/31. It’s the day the Mozilla code is open-sourced to the world, and the day the Mozilla Project is formally launched.

    Three thirty-one was the result of a massive amount of work in two short months. The intent to make open source the code for “Netscape Navigator” had been announced on January 22. On that date the code was not ready, we didn’t know which free software / open source license we would use, and we didn’t have a structure for running an open source project. That was pure Netscape style.

Mozilla: Happy 20th Anniversary to Mozilla, Asa Dotzler's Story, and Facebook 'Protection'

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Moz/FF
  • Happy 20th Anniversary to Mozilla, New pfSense Version, Android HiddenMiner Malware and More

    ZTE is now offering the first Android Go smartphone based on the Snapdragon mobile platform. The ZTE Tempo Go "offers a 5.0-inch 854 x 480 display, quad-core 1.1GHz Snapdragon 210 chipset, 1GB of RAM and 8GB of internal storage, microSD slot, 5MP rear camera, 2MP front shooter, Wi-Fi 802.11b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.2, and a 2200mAh battery" and sells for $79.

  • Asa Dotzler: mozilla.org is 20 years old

    Netscape Communications made two important announcements on January 23rd, 1998:

        First, that the Netscape Communicator product would be available free of charge;
        
        Second, that the source code for Communicator would also be free.

    On March 31st, the first developer release of the source code to Communicator was made available.

    But what now? For the product to grow and mature and continue to be useful and innovative, the various changes made by disparate developers across the web must be collated, organized, and brought together as a cohesive whole.

  • Mozilla releases Facebook Container Extension for Firefox

    Mozilla, the developer of Firefox — the default browser in Fedora — recently announced the new Facebook Container Extension. This extension is designed to give Firefox users better control of their data on Facebook. Specifically, the new extension limits Facebook’s ability to track your activity using third-party cookies. If you want to use Facebook, but limit the data shared with other websites, this extension might be worth a look.

Mozilla: Turning 20, Comments to the European Commission, SQLite, Firefox 60, Trial Against Trump

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  • Mozilla’s profound open source momentum assisted rewrite rules of tech

    Mozilla’s profound open source momentum assisted rewrite rules of tech as twenty years ago Netscape Communications was despairing. It was the favorite of the first wave of internet companies for its capability to let you surf the web but Microsoft had squeezed business likelihood by conferring a web browser for free.

    So Netscape took a step that was radical for the time. On March 31, 1998 it conferred the source code following its Netscape communicator browser, the once undisclosed programming directives that developers utilized to construct the software. The project Mozilla constituted to submit the crown jewels.

  • Effective and rights-protective procedures for tackling illegal content – Mozilla files comment to the European Commission

    For many years we have sought to lead the way in developing an internet that promotes human dignity, civil discourse, individual expression and collaborative problem-solving. Unfortunately, illegal content online – from hate speech to terrorist content – undermines the overall health of the internet and stifles its empowering nature. In that context, developing policy frameworks and industry best practices for tackling illegal content in a rights-protective manner is one of our key policy objectives.

    The EU – like many other regulatory jurisdictions around the world – is currently considering new measures to ensure effective removal of illegal content from the internet. To that end, the European Commission recently published a policy roadmap on the issue, which included – amongst others – the suggestion that Internet platforms be obliged to implement automated mechanisms to both detect attempted uploads of illegal content and filter any such content on their services.

  • Bedrock: The SQLitening

    On its face www.mozilla.org doesn’t look like it’d be a complex application to write, maintain, or run. But when you throw over 100 million unique visitors per week at any site it can complicate things quickly. Add to that translations of the content into over 100 languages and you can start to get the idea of where it might get interesting. So we take every opportunity to simplify and reduce hosting complexity and cost we can get. This is the place from which the idea to switch to using SQLite for our database needs in production was born.

  • Firefox 60 Beta 6 Testday Results

    Last Friday, March 23rd we held a Testday event, for Firefox 60 Beta 6.

    Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place!

    From India team: Surentharan R.A and Suren, Aditya Anand, Baranitharan, ILANKHATIR, Nivetha and Fahima Zulfath A.

  • A Healthy Internet Needs Trust & Diversity

    Today, Mozilla joined 115 companies in filing a friend of the court brief with the United States Supreme Court to demonstrate our continued opposition to the U.S. travel ban in State of Washington v. Trump.

    As we’ve said from the outset, this travel ban threatens the free flow of ideas and innovation across borders that is an essential part of our DNA as a technology company. It also puts in jeopardy our mission to protect and advance the internet as a global public resource that is open and accessible to all.

    In a similar filing with the lower circuit court, we outlined these objections along with broader concerns about the disturbing way in which the executive order at the heart of this case erodes trust in U.S. immigration law. We cannot afford to have such a dangerous precedent set that could damage the international cooperation required to develop and maintain the open internet.

Mozilla: Turning 20, Doing Screenshots, Add-ons Manager

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  • Mozilla marks 20th anniversary with commitment to better human experiences online

    This coming Saturday — March 31 — is Mozilla’s 20th anniversary. We’ve accomplished a fair amount in the first 20 years. We aim to accomplish even more in the next 20 years. To do this, we’ve modernized nearly every aspect of Mozilla, from Firefox to the many ways we connect people and technology.

    We’re making our first major addition to the key principles that form the foundation for Mozilla’s work. These principles are set out in the Mozilla Manifesto, which was launched in 2007. The Mozilla Manifesto identifies ten principles that we work to build into Firefox and online life generally. The internet should be a global public resource, open and accessible to all. Individuals should have control of their experience. Safety is critical. Private commercial profit and social benefit should coexist in a healthy fashion. We use these principles regularly to describe Mozilla’s identity and inform our decision-making. You can see the Manifesto here.

  • You can edit, highlight and crop your screenshots!

    Two weeks ago, Screenshots started shipping with the ability to draw on and re-crop shots. Keep an eye out for the little edit icon on the top-right corner of your ‘My Shots’ page.

  • Hack on MDN: Building useful tools with browser compatibility data

    From Friday, March 16 to Sunday, March 18, 2018, thirty-four people met in Mozilla’s Paris office to work on improving MDN’s Browser Compat Data. The amazing results included 221 pull requests that improved the quality of our data and created, prototyped, and improved tools and dashboards.

  • Meet the Add-ons Manager

    Ever wanted to fancy up your Firefox experience but weren’t sure how to do it? Are you familiar with the Add-ons Manager in Firefox? If not, please allow us to introduce you. This Firefox feature can help you discover add-ons that will have you browsing like a power-user in no time.

  • Mozilla Releases Firefox Add-On That Prevents Facebook from Spying on You

    After the whole Facebook Cambridge Analytica scandal, many companies took measures to protect their clients, including Mozilla, which released a free Firefox add-on to protect the privacy of its users.

    Your privacy is the most important thing in the world, especially when browsing the Internet, so you need to make sure the platforms and websites you visit can be trusted. All of us though Facebook could be trusted, but it proved otherwise, so now you can prevent it from tracking you on the Web if you're using Firefox.

Mozilla's radical open-source move helped rewrite rules of tech

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Moz/FF
OSS

Twenty years ago, Netscape Communications was desperate. It was the darling of the first wave of internet companies for its ability to let you surf the web, but Microsoft had crushed its business prospects by giving away a web browser for free.

So Netscape did something that was radical for the time: On March 31, 1998, it gave away the source code behind its Netscape Communicator browser, the once-secret programming instructions that developers used to build the software. The project, called Mozilla, amounted to surrendering the crown jewels.

Read more

Mozilla News

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Moz/FF
  • Survey Says, Firefox Loves Oddballs

    For the second year in a row, we did a bit of informal censusing last month to get to know our users in the best way possible: anonymously and collectively. Maybe you saw and took the survey, which we shared through email, our about:home page, and social media. There were some important questions and some not quite as important questions on it, but what was important was that it was totally voluntary and—like everything we do—about openness and transparency. Well, and having at least some fun on the internet.

  • ES modules: A cartoon deep-dive

    ES modules bring an official, standardized module system to JavaScript. It took a while to get here, though — nearly 10 years of standardization work.

  • Briefly Noted: An overview of the past, present and future of Firefox Notes

    Hi, I’m Ryan Feeley, Staff Designer for Firefox Accounts, Sync and Privacy. Last year we launched the Notes experiment to see if a basic notepad in our newly extensible sidebar could, with regular user feedback and iterative development, grow to become an indispensable Firefox feature. It’s exciting that months later I’m writing my draft of this blog post in Notes, while I copy/paste source material from various tabs to my right.

  • Andy McKay: Leaving Mozilla

    Today is my last day at Mozilla as a paid employee. Seven and a half years at Mozilla has been a heck of ride. I feel lucky and honoured to have had such an awesome opportunity.

    In terms projects I've gone from AMO, through the Firefox OS Marketplace, through Marketplace Payments, then back to AMO and WebExtensions. Those last couple of years, as we rebooted the add-ons ecosystem, was probably my proudest moment professionally.

  • We’re Hiring a Build Engineer

    We at the Thunderbird project are hiring a Build and Release Engineer. Interested in getting paid to work on Thunderbird? You’ll find information about the role ,as well as how to apply, below!

  • New Firefox Extension Builds a Wall Around Facebook

    Mozilla on Tuesday announced Facebook Container, a Firefox browser extension that is designed to segregate users' activity on Facebook from their other Web activity, limiting Facebook's ability to track them and gather personal data.

    Mozilla recently has engaged in an aggressive strategy to counter Facebook data management policies that many see as intrusive.

    The extension is the culmination of more than two years of research into developing a more private browsing experience, Mozilla said. However, the organization accelerated its development after the Cambridge Analytica data scandal came to light.

  • Limit personal data exposure with Firefox containers

    There was some noise recently about the massive amount of data gathered by Cambridge Analytica from Facebook users. While I don't use Facebook myself, I do use Google and other services which are known to gather a massive amount of data, and I obviously know a lot of people using those services. I also saw some posts or tweet threads about the data collection those services do.

    Mozilla recently released a Firefox extension to help users confine Facebook data collection. This addon is actually based on the containers technology Mozilla develops since few years. It started as an experimental feature in Nightly, then as a test pilot experiment, and finally evolved into a fully featured extension called Multi-Account containers. A somehow restricted version of this is even included directly in Firefox but you don't have the configuration window without the extension and you need to configure it manually with about:config.

Mozilla and Facebook

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Moz/FF
  • The Firefox Accounts authentication zoo

    After my article on the browser sync mechanisms I spent some time figuring out how Firefox Accounts work. The setup turned out remarkably complex, with many different server types communicating with each other even for the most basic tasks. While this kind of overspecialization probably should be expected given the scale at which this service operates, the number of different authentication methods is surprising and the official documentation only tells a part of the story while already being fairly complex. I’ll try to show the entire picture here, in case somebody else needs to piece it all together.

    [...]

    Clearly, some parts of this setup made sense at some point but no longer do. This especially applies to the use of BrowserID: the complicated generation and verification process makes no sense if only one issuer is allowed. The protocol is built on top of JSON Web Tokens (JWT), yet using JWT without any modifications would make a lot more sense here.

    Also, why is Mozilla using their own token library that looks like a proprietary version of JWT? It seems that this library was introduced before JWT came along, today it is simply historical ballast.

  • Being Open and Connected on Your Own Terms with our New Facebook Container Add-On

    There’s an important conversation going on right now about the power that companies like Facebook wield over our lives. These businesses are built on technology platforms that are so complex, it’s unreasonable to expect users to fully understand the implications of interacting with them. As a user of the internet, you deserve a voice and should be able to use the internet on your own terms. In light of recent news on how the aggregation of user data can be used in surprising ways, we’ve created an add-on for Firefox called Facebook Container, based on technology we’ve been working on for the last couple of years and accelerated in response to what we see in terms of growing demand for tools that help manage privacy and security.

  • Mozilla Launches “Facebook Container” To Stop Your Data Tracking On The Web

    Mozilla has designed the addon to make it harder for the blue network to track people everywhere they can. The company says that it’s based on technologies they have been working for years to help manage privacy and security.

  • Facebook Container Extension: Take control of how you’re being tracked

    Our Multi-Account Containers extension has been a game changer for many users, letting them manage various parts of their online life without intermingling their accounts. To help Firefox users have more control of their data on Facebook, we’ve created the Facebook Container Extension.

  • Meet the open sorcerers who have vowed to make Facebook history

    Once upon a time the internet ran on open protocols, and anyone could host servers that ran these protocols. Your first dial-up internet connection probably came with a bundle of tools for groups and chat. If you weren't happy with the service from your ISP you'd point the client at another. The internet was open and federated, with tons of innovation at the client end.

    But the protocol developers went to sleep for 20 years. We haven't seen much infrastructure development since the crypto protocols in the mid-1990s. Naturally, people wanted to do what they've always done, groups and chat, and so along came Mark Zuckerberg to turn the open, federated web into a private plantation. And here we all are, complaining that Mark Zuckerberg has too much power and no competition.

  • Experiments with "Good First Experience"

    If we think of an OSS project like a team of climbers ascending a mountain, a GFE is a camp part-way up the route that backpackers can visit in order to get a feel for the real thing. A GFE is also like a good detective novel: you know the mystery is going to get solved by the end, but nevertheless, it's thrilling to experience the journey, and see how it happens. Could I solve this before the book does?

  • Improving the Add-ons Linter

Mozilla: Firefox 59.0.2 and Graduation Reports

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  • Mozilla Releases Firefox 59.0.2 to Fix High CPU/Memory Bug, Audio Issue on BSD

    Mozilla released on Monday the second point release of its latest Firefox 59 "Quantum" web browser for all supported platforms, fixing quite a bunch of issues and adding various improvements.

    The Firefox 59.0.2 maintenance release is here to address a high CPU and memory bug caused by third-party apps on various computers, though Mozilla didn't mention if it affects all supported platforms. It also improves page rendering when hardware acceleration is enabled.

  • Snooze Tabs Graduation Report

    Snooze Tabs launched as an experiment in Test Pilot in February 2017 with the goal of making it easier for people to continue tasks in Firefox at a time of their choosing. From previous research conducted by the Firefox User Research team on task continuity and workflows, we started to develop an understanding of the ways people’s workflows can span multiple contexts and the types of behaviors and tools that people use to support context switching and task continuity. We knew, for example, that leaving browser tabs open is one way that people actively hold tasks to which they intend to return later.

  • Voice Fill Graduation Report

    Last year, Mozilla launched several parallel efforts to build capability around voice technologies. While work such as the Common Voice and DeepSpeech projects took aim at creating a foundation for future open source voice recognition projects, the Voice Fill experiment in Test Pilot took a more direct approach by building voice-based search into Firefox to learn if such a feature would be valuable to Firefox users. We also wanted to push voice research at Mozilla by contributing general tooling and training data to add value to future voice projects.

  • Min Vid Graduation Report

    We launched the Min Vid experiment in Test Pilot in the Fall of 2016. Min Vid created a pop-out video player that let participants play videos in a small, standalone window that would sit on top of any other content on the screen.

    Min Vid has been a success in Test Pilot, both in terms of usage, and in terms of what we learned in the process of building it. From the start, the feature proved extremely popular with our audience. It’s consistently been our most installed experiment since Page Shot left Test Pilot to become Firefox Screenshots.

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